Courses: Fall 2018

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100-Level English Courses | 200-Level English Courses | 300-Level English Courses | 400-Level English Courses | 500-Level English Graduate Courses

ENG 100 – Intro to College Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: May not be taken concurrently with ENG 101.

A writing course that offers practice in reading complex texts, writing with fluency and using the conventions of standard written English. Regularly scheduled conferences with instructor required. S/U grading.

40043 MWF 8:30-9:50 RACHEL SARKAR

A writing course that offers practice in reading complex texts, writing with fluency and using the conventions of standard written English. Regularly scheduled conferences with instructor required. S/U grading.

40382 MTWRF 9:00-9:50 MICHAEL BELL

In English 100 you will receive intensive guidance in the thinking, reading, and writing practices expected of college students. The specific subjects of our discussions will determined by the questions and interests of the individual students who take the course, but during all these discussions we will practice an approach that explores connections between texts, the world, and our own experiences. The ability to make such connections is the essence of “critical thinking,” a way of using information actively to form the new ideas that drive the university. After completing English 100 you will be further prepared to take part in this endeavor.

EVALUATION: In addition to reading assignments and participation in class activities, requirements will comprise one formal analytical paper (comprising multiple drafts), a variety short informal writing assignments, and a final project.

TEXTS: There are no required texts. We will gather our reading from the research interests of the students who take the course.

 

ENG 101 – Writing Your Way Through WWU

Prerequisites & Notes: May not be taken concurrently with ENG 100. GUR: ACOM

A writing course designed to prepare students for college-level creative, critical, and reflective writing. Because writing looks and works differently in different contexts, this course teaches the rhetorical competencies that students need to write across multiple disciplines. The course introduces students both to the processes of building and analyzing ideas, and to ways of communicating those ideas in context-specific genres for targeted audiences. This course has the immediate goal of preparing students to succeed in their writing at Western, but it will also serve them personally and professionally. Students needing to satisfy Block A of the communications section of the General University Requirements, which ENG 101 does, are required to do so prior to completion of 45 credits. Students with a 4 or 5 AP score are encouraged to take this class so they can learn to adapt their test-taking skills to college coursework.

OVERRIDES / CAPACITY OVERRIDES ARE NEVER GRANTED FOR ENGLISH 101. English 101 is capped at 24 students due to the constraints of the physical space. Please see Course Basics for more information about ENG 101.

 

ENG 110 – Write/Remix with Western Reads

In this computer-mediated writing course, students respond to the Western Reads text by constructing and designing different kinds of print, visual, and oral texts. This course is recommended for freshmen.

42031 MW 1:00-1:50 KAITLYN TEER

 

ENG 201 – Wrt in Humanit:FairytaleStudy

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101 or 4/5 AP English Language Exam. CCOM GUR.

Advanced instruction and practice in writing using ideas, texts and questions from a specified topic in the humanities. Areas and focus vary with section.

41026 MWF 8:30-9:50 DONNA QUALLEY

Researching & Retelling Fairy Tales: Fairytales have been continually adapted, remixed, and retold in various ways for different audiences for centuries. Part of the magic of these oral, literary, and cultural texts lies in the ways they provide glimpses into the human experience. What do fairytales tell us about our diverse histories, values, fears, and dreams? How might these seemingly “simple” and familiar stories provide a window into our sense of cultural and social identity? How do we define fairytales and how do fairytales define us? In this writing and research course, we’ll examine how scholars in the humanities might approach the study of these stories: What questions about fairy tales would be interesting to folklorists, storytellers, poets, artists, musicians, historians, anthropologists, literary and cultural critics, feminists, folklorists and philosophers? How would they pursue research into these stories of human experience?

We will begin our inquiry by looking closely at different versions of the fairytale, “Little Red Riding Hood.” You’ll then choose a popular fairytale from a selected list to study, research, and write about throughout the quarter. You’ll look at the ways your tale has been represented and retold for different audiences (children, young adults, and adults) in different cultures, during different times, and through different media. You’ll look at what other writers and scholars have to say about your tale. We’ll spend a good part of our class time in the computer lab working with different writing moves. Major writing projects include a curated fairy tale website and your own imaginative retelling, accompanied by a critical analysis of the fairy tale you have studied.

TEXTS:

  • Little Red Riding Hood Uncloaked: Sex, Morality, and the Evolution of the Fairytale, Catherine Orenstein
  • Additional readings on Canvas, in the Library, and on the web.

 

ENG 202 – Writing About Literature

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. BCOM GUR.

A writing course designed to help students develop the skills of close reading and careful analysis of literary texts, with particular attention to how language, style, and form contribute to a text's social or political claims. Introduces students to the challenge of situating themselves in relation to a literary text and the critical conversation about that text, and crafting multi-draft critical essays with a focused, arguable thesis supported by thoughtful sequence of claims and carefully selected textual evidence.

40216 MWF 10:00-11:20 SIMON MCGUIRE

This section of Eng 202 uses Making Arguments About Literature: A Compact Guide and Anthology as central reference and text. To give the course an emphasis for discussion and writing, we will explore the early work of James Joyce: Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. All 3 texts are required, and other required readings and texts will be made available in class and on Canvas.

40384 MWF 1:00-2:20 TONY PRICHARD

Literature and Madness: This course directs attention to where literature and madness overlap by examining texts that either include characters experiencing hallucinations or texts that claim to produce madness. We will inquire into the differences between madness, weirdness and that which is yet to be articulated and made habitual.  Required Texts: The King in Yellow (online) by Robert Chambers; Shadows of Carcosa: Tales of Cosmic Horror by Lovecraft, Chambers, Machen, Poe, and other Masters of the Weird; The Dead Mountaineer’s Hotel by Strugastsky, Arkaday & Boris; Chocky by John Wyndham.

40575 MWF 2:30-3:50 SIMON MCGUIRE

This section of Eng 202 uses Making Arguments About Literature: A Compact Guide and Anthology as central reference and text. To give the course an emphasis for discussion and writing, we will explore the early work of James Joyce: Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. All 3 texts are required, and other required readings and texts will be made available in class and on Canvas.

41024 TR 8:00-9:50 KAITLYN TEER

In this composition course, we will practice close reading and critical analysis of literature that engages a sense of place and write personal, creative, and academic responses to these texts. We will draw on a range of genres, including poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, as well as various forms of literary criticism to consider the connections between landscape, culture, identity, and belonging, to examine approaches to representing and giving voice to place, and to explore the generic boundaries of writing about nature and place. Readings may include, but are not limited to, selections from the anthologies Reading and Writing about Literature and The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World. Through reading, discussing, writing, and revising, you will build analytical skills and develop a critical essay rooted in your own interests and responses to our questions about these texts.

42079 TR 10:00-11:50 NANCY PAGH

"Writing about Literature" introduces students to ways of reading and writing that are specific to the discipline of literary study.  It is also useful for general readers hungry to move beyond automatic, general, or superficial responses to literary texts, and for creative writers eager to better understand the tools and effects of their craft.  In 202 we explore the differences between reading and close reading; distinctions between opinion and analysis; patterns and contrasts within and between genres (such as poetry and fiction) and the conventions that attend them (such as lineation, scansion, plot, and character development).  Students will practice a sequence of reading and writing tasks designed to build critical skills and enable them to begin to imagine themselves as participants in the ongoing conversation that is literary analysis.

Evaluation will be based on consistent preparation and active participation in class exercises, workshops, and discussions; satisfactory completion of assigned reading and written work (including journaling, drafts, quizzes); and assessment of revised and polished writing that demonstrates the student’s ability to construct a focused and arguable claim, informed by thoughtful critical reading and evidence, in an intentionally structured and edited essay, that offers an original idea about the way a literary text functions in the world.  As this is a T/R class, students are also required to meet in small groups outside of class as directed for the 5th-hour credit.

Required textbook:  Janet E. Gardner et al., Literature: A Portable Anthology 4th Edition (ISBN-13: 978-1319035341). 

Students should also own a good dictionary (showing syllables, not just definition) and an English language usage handbook of your choice.  A dictionary/glossary of literary terms is recommended.

42727 TR 2:00-3:50 MICHAEL BELL

This section of English 202 involves critical inquiry into a key aspect of the literary “effect”: the power of fantastic narrative to construct and inform our worldly experience, even our reality. Such stories operate in the realm of myth, and it is largely from such stories that we have learned what it is to be a human being. To sometimes great extent, we model our identities on fantastic stories, and form our expectations, assumptions, and judgments from them—it is from stories imbued with myth that we draw the arcs of narrative on which we plot the courses of our lives. The stories we read in this course will range from ancient Irish epic to graphic novels to contemporary apocalypse fiction. Through intensive reading, discussion, activity, and writing we will further develop our ability to make meaning from literary texts, focusing our analyses through formal critical practices as well as rigorous play and experimentation. You will emerge from the course a stronger analytic writer and reader with greater appreciation of the power of literature to bring you to deeper self-knowledge and increased awareness of a wider, richer, more complex world.

REQUIRED TEXTS: Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach, by Kelly Robson, The Tain, by Ciaran Carson, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, by Neil Gaiman, Sabrina, by Nick Drnaso, and Stories of Your Life and Others, by Ted Chiang

ASSIGNMENTS: In addition to reading assignments and participation in class activities, requirements will comprise one formal analytical paper (including multiple drafts), a variety informal writing assignments, participation in online forums, and a final project.

44122 TR 12:00-01:50 CHRISTOPHER LOAR

Writing Animals: Nonhuman animals present us with a paradox: they are often thought to represent humanity's opposite, but they are also fully integrated into our lives (as companions, as food, and as symbols). This course explores this paradox in a wide range of literary texts, from poetic meditations on beloved or fearsome creatures to novels featuring human relationships with animals. We'll also read some nonfictional texts to spur our thinking about the roles that nonhuman animals play in our lives.

  • Reading assignments (poetry, fiction, nonfiction)
  • Several formal and informal writing assignments
  • Active engagement in class discussions

 

ENG 214 - Shakespeare

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a selected number of Shakespeare's plays: histories, comedies, tragedies and romances

40217 MWF 2:30-3:50 CHRISTOPHER PATTON

To study Shakespeare is to study ourselves. Our language is full of his turns of phrase. His drama informs our drama, our cinema, and our TV shows, from South Park to Game of Thrones to Westworld. We’re going to explore just how current Shakespeare is by putting his plays into action—sometimes from the page (in ear and mind), sometimes on the stage (for eye and ear). Which brings us to the fine print. And it’s important enough to start with some big print. PLEASE TAKE NOTE. This is not your usual GUR. There will be no lectures. There will be no midterm exam. There will be no final exam. There will be a whole lot of discussion; regular journal writing; a memorization and recitation assignment; blocking projects; and a group performance project worth a big fat chunk of your grade. You’ll be asked to memorize a part and to perform, in character, in front of your peers, although acting ability is not a prerequisite. Do not sign up for this course if you’re not ready to attend every class and to participate actively in all aspects of our work together. For those who so ready, the class is a lot of fun. Our plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, Othello, The Tempest.

 

ENG 216 – American Literature

 

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a range of texts in American literature with attention to cultural contexts.

42728 TR 10:00-11:50 LAURA LAFFRADO

CONTENT: With a focus on the US nineteenth century, this course will involve analysis, interpretation, and discussion of a wide range of texts by diverse writers.

ASSIGNMENTS & EVALUATION:

Requirements include exams, quizzes, lots of reading, and lots of thinking.

TEXTS:

  • The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume B, seventh edition
  • Selected Writings of Ella Higginson: Inventing Pacific Northwest Literature

 

ENG 227 – Queer Literature

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a range of texts by queer authors.

41595 TR 2:00-3:50 ELIZABETH COLEN

In this course we will read, respond to, and analyze a wide range of texts. Students will explore the historical context of these works and exercise and refine literary analysis skills by examining how an author uses context, form, language, and elements of style to deal with the personal, social, and political. Our encounters with the work will maintain a critical eye towards intersections of race, class, economics, ethnicity, ability, and others. As such, we will examine the literature of liminal spaces and their bearing on the future of queer culture. Students will be responsible for and graded on written literary analyses, class presentations, and regular participation in class discussions.

 

ENG 235 – Native/Indigenous Literatures

Prerequisites & Notes: BCGM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of written, spoken and visual texts in English and translation by native and Indigenous writers and storytellers of North America.

42730 TR 12:00-1:50 LEE GULYAS

We will focus on contemporary literature by Indigenous authors from the continent we call North America, and read, discuss and interpret these works through history, theory, and artistic contexts. Instead of a survey of an extremely diverse and wide-ranging set of literatures, we will practice the skills that readers need to engage with Native & Indigenous Literature on its own terms.

 

ENG 238 – Society/Lit: Refuge/Hope(FYE)

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM GUR and FYE (First Year Experience).

A thematic approach to literature, with different themes exploring the relationship between literary forms and society. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics. May be taken only once for GUR credit.

41605 MWF 11:30-12:50 NANCY JOHNSON

CONTENT: This course will explore historical and contemporary human rights issues associated with the hope and heartache of immigration. Literature can open our eyes, complicate our beliefs, and force us to wrestle with the myriad reasons human beings seek refuge. It can also put human faces on issues in the news, deepening our understanding of the complexities behind sometimes emotional discussions, and raising issues that affect children, teens, and adults. In this course, we will turn to literature, film, documentary, music, and art, often featuring children and teens, to examine multiple perspectives and consider our relationships, roles and responsibilities -- personal, familial, community -- to the reason people seek refuge. We will read, write, and respond examining the sacrifice and trials, as well as the resilience and resolve, that are central to refugees' and immigrants' experiences.  And, we will create new understandings, learning with and from each other in the intimacy of this small FYE class.

EXPECTATIONS: This is a reading intensive course that will demand your active participation through group discussions, small group projects, and written, visual, and aesthetic response assignments. Come willing to having your eyes opened by stories of people, including children, who love their homes but are forced to make arduous journeys in their attempt to find safety. Be prepared to learn, discover, experience, even question what you know or think you know as we examine the harsh realities and human sacrifice of immigration.

*** Please wait to purchase books until you come to class. ***


SOME POSSIBLE TEXTS:

  • Refugee (A. Gratz)
  • Salt to the Sea (R. Septys)
  • Stormy Seas: Stories of Young Boat Refugees (M.B. Leatherdale and E. Shakespeare)
  • A Land of Permanent Goodbyes (A. Abawi)
  • A Long Walk to Water (L. S. Park)

 

ENG 239 – Latina/o Literatures

Prerequisites & Notes: BCGM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a range of texts in English and in translation by Latina/o authors.

43999 MWF 10:00-11:20 LYSA RIVERA

Welcome to English 239. This survey course introduces students to 20th and 21st century U.S. Latinx literatures (written in English). While the broader goal of the course is to develop an appreciation for the differences between and within these U.S. Latinx communities, a more specific focus will consider how these writers have turned to language and literature as modes of identity production and community building. We will study representative works of various genres: the personal essay, poetry, and narrative fiction (both short-stories and novels) and film. Related topics we are likely to address include the tension between the individual and community, race and identity formation, the experience of being bicultural or mixed-raced, stories of migration and displacement, and narratives of resistance and resilience.

 

ENG 282 – Global Literatures: Ireland

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM. TRAVEL. Faculty-Led Global Learning Program: Ireland. For Program Details and Cost Visit: www.wwu.edu/GlobalLearning/. Self-Sustaining tuition is $250 per creidt which is not included in 10-18 credit tuition costs.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a range of texts in global literatures with attention to cultural contexts.

43112 TBD JULIE DUGGER

 

ENG 301 – Wrtg Stds: #WritingNetworks

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. Junior status.

Inquiry and practice of writing in personal, public and academic contexts. Emphasis on expressive, analytical, critical, and collaborative forms of writing as appropriate. Repeatable with different topics up to 10 credits including original course.

40138 MWF 1:00-2:20 JEREMY CUSHMAN

#WritingNetworks: So here's a persistent and maybe familiar set of questions: What impact do dynamic digital tools have on the composition and distribution of texts? On the difficult work of identification? And even on the cultivation of seemingly stable notions like ethos, democracy, friendship, and facts. Writing and rhetoric scholars devote significant intellectual energy scrutinizing such questions. They want to better understand what emerges and recedes within the shifting relationship among digital networks, writing, and rhetoric. Many of these scholars argue that digital networks--both as a metaphor and as a descriptive noun--expose us to our already susceptible meaning-making practices. In other words, the ways we construct meaning for ourselves is already tangled up with the methods, practices, and certainly with others that we cannot help but encounter over and over again. #WritingNetworks, then, serves as but one name for the increasing experience of encountering ourselves as a radically open and changing system.

#WritingNetworks is also the name of a writing practice. Together, we'll practice writing that doesn’t have a clear, stable audience. We'll practice writing that gets reposted, remixed, recycled, and rewritten--writing that, hopefully, travels, that goes viral (although that’s such an unfortunate metaphor). #WritingNetworks as a practice requires the production of careful alphabetic text that simultaneously invites folks to read closely and to raid quickly. It also entails graphics, links, embeds, anecdotes, juxtaposition, video, audio, and so on. So yeah, #WritingNetworks is loose; it’s always moving and morphing.

To get after #WritingNetworks, we're going to organize all our writing work around three network-y concepts: Circulation, Assemblage, & Consequentiality: 

  1. Assemblage captures how writing practices bring other objects (humans and nonhumans) together in surprising ways. Objects, even ideas, tend to form groups or cliques as it were, and these cliques cohere--often without our permission--around writing practices (or vice versa: your own writing might be drawn toward other objects).
  2. Circulation describes the movement between and within assemblages irrespective of the writer's or designer’s or producer’s intent. That is, circulation names what your writing does without you.   
  3. Consequentiality allows us to trace different assemblages and to ask questions about consequences. For example, how does an act of writing transform others, human and/or nonhuman? How does a writing practice effect how other objects circulate relative to other objects—how humans relate to other humans and to nonhumans? How does writing construct or co-construct the agency of others and other objects?

We'll use these concepts in an effort to better approach the micro and macro levels of writing as a set of wide open, meaning-making practices that compose us as much as we engage with them.

 

ENG 302 – Inro Tech & Professional Wrtng

Prerequisites & Notes: WP3.

Introduction to major contemporary strategies and conventions used in written and oral communication for multiple audiences in professional settings. Covers a variety of written forms used in the preparation and design of technical and business documents, critical analyses of these forms and practices, and the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

40139 MWF 10:00-11:20 RACHEL SARKAR

Introduction to major contemporary strategies and conventions used in written and oral communication for multiple audiences in professional settings. Covers a variety of written forms used in the preparation and design of technical and business documents, critical analyses of these forms and practices, and the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

40433 TR 10:00-11:50 NICOLE BROWN

This interdisciplinary course puts knowledge into action by inventing, interpreting, translating, writing, designing, and distributing technical knowledge for audiences to easily understand and apply effectively.

In addition to rhetorical analysis and writing strategies, we will explore the influence of globalization and localization on information  and related behavior in social, economic, and ecological contexts. We will discuss how we view authorship and writing, the social construction of knowledge, and how we imagine readers as information users and discourse as social action.

A primary goal for the course is to construct a portfolio of rhetorically savvy documents for use with public audiences outside the  class: resumes, cover letters, memos, interpretive materials, instructional documents, usability testing reports, proposals, and other visual representations of information. 

Similar to most technical writing contexts, these projects require you to work individually as well as collaboratively, conduct out of class observations and research, and to practice/learn new knowledge concepts and computer applications outside regular class times. Throughout the term, you will participate in the ongoing process of digital writing that includes: planning, researching, drafting, collaborating, critiquing, revising, and presenting.

40529 TR 10:00-11:50 MICHAEL BELL

In this section of English 302 you’ll develop your skill in generating reader-centered documents that work: documents that do things as well as say things, performing specific functions for specific kinds of readers. Given that so much of our culture now communicates and conducts its business in the visual realm, your work in the course will be focused as much on document design as written language. Through this work you will gain an understanding of how all the elements of a document work together to communicate within specific contexts, for specific audiences.

English 302 is not simply a skills-acquisition course however. It’s also a course about ideas. We will use technical communication as a field in which to conduct analytic inquiry appropriate to study in the humanities. The course is organized around a sequence of projects. Each of them focus on an aspect of professional communication, but all of them will work within a guiding framework. This spring the analytic component of the course will take us into a study of games and the culture surrounding them: from board games, to collectible card games, to table-top role-playing games, to social-media games, to video games.

You will emerge from the course with the ability to respond effectively to the requirements of technical communication. You will also have a complex understanding of what is becoming a vital aspect of our contemporary culture.

ASSIGNMENTS/EVALUATION: As a student of the course, you will be collaborating with other students on a series of documents and prototypes leading to the development of an original tabletop game. The design of your game will be based in part on contemporary game studies and critiques. Every stage of this development will generate a breadth of documents in accord with the guidelines of effective technical and professional communication. (And yes, we will be playing games in class!)

TEXTS: There are no required texts.

40529 TR 12:00-1:50 MARGARET FOX

In English 302, we’ll explore the main elements of technical and professional writing, or writing in action. We’ll consider a wide range of rhetorical situations, focusing on the needs and interests of readers, and the purposes and contexts for documents. Course topics will include document design and strategies for sentence clarity. The class will also cover the importance of invention, research, and empathy in professional writing.

During this writing intensive course, we’ll create résumés and cover letters, and other materials. We’ll work collaboratively on an advocacy project. Final portfolios of revised projects will showcase the quarter’s work.

TEXTS: Reserved material and online sources.

40673 TR 12:00-1:50 GERI FORSBERG

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of non-academic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives for their written documents, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, instructions, and a magazine article.  Students also learn to work in small groups, collaborate on writing, and make effective oral presentations. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work.  When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

40748 TR 2:00-3:50 GERI FORSBERG

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of non-academic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives for their written documents, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, instructions, and a magazine article.  Students also learn to work in small groups, collaborate on writing, and make effective oral presentations. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work.  When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

40818 TR 4:00-5:50 GERI FORSBERG

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of non-academic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives for their written documents, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, instructions, and a magazine article.  Students also learn to work in small groups, collaborate on writing, and make effective oral presentations. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work.  When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

 

ENG 307 – Seminar: Medieval

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 307 if you have already taken ENG 317 or 307.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the medieval period. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 307 and ENG 317 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

42002 TR 12:00-1:50 NICHOLAS MARGARITIS

Medieval Literature: An in-depth study of medieval literary masterpieces, including Dante's Inferno and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.  Crucial attention to historical context, though the main emphasis will be on the aesthetic achievements of individual genius.  The course grade will be based mainly on short papers.

 

ENG 308 – Seminar: Early Modern

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 308 if you have already taken ENG 318 or 308.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the Early Modern period. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 308 and ENG 318 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

42003 MWF 8:30-9:50 MARY METZGER

Shakespeare and Philosophy: In this course, we will read a range of Shakespeare’s tragedies in light of philosophical questions they raise and attempt to answer, with a particular emphasis on human knowledge (epistemology) and right action (ethics). The course assumes no philosophical background but we will spend time establishing a working vocabulary and basic historical understanding of philosophical and literary forms and focus on a few major ethical theories. Throughout the course, we will explore the connection between philosophical inquiry, human complexity, and literary and, more specifically, tragic poetic & dramatic form and meaning. We will use occasional excerpts from philosophers to develop our understanding as we read and discuss Shakespeare’s work. Much writing, close reading, and critical thinking is required.


TEXT: The Norton Shakespeare: Tragedies (No substitute)

 

ENG 309 – Seminar: The Long 18th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 309 if you have already taken ENG 319 or 309.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the long eighteenth century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 309 and ENG 319 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

42004 TR 8:00-9:50 LAURA LAFFRADO

CONTENT: This courses focuses on the time period that scholars have recently named the long eighteenth century—that is, the era that extends from the late seventeenth century to the early nineteenth century. These are such dynamic years in the literature of what becomes the United States. We will read literary works by women and by men of various races, ethnicities, religions, and economic positions that explore vital issues of the day such as liberty, literacy, revolution, and science. We will examine the various ways in which a dominant rich male whiteness is challenged as America and American identities are formed and defined.

ASSIGNMENTS: In this course you will write both extensively and intensively, producing multiple drafts of papers, revisions, and finished essays. We will devote class time for instruction and practice in disciplinary research methods and writing strategies. Students will write short responses to the reading, shorter essays, and one twelve-page critical research paper that engages with current scholarship on an eighteenth-century text or texts assigned for class. Much reading, writing, and thinking will be asked of you, along with steady attendance, a participation grade, group work, and various out-of-class assignments

EVALUATION: 75% of your final grade in this course will be based on revised versions of writing assignments. The remaining 25% will be based on class participation and attendance.

TEXTS: Lauter, Paul (ed.), The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume A, 7th edition.

 

ENG 310 – Seminar: The Long 19th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 310 if you have already taken ENG 320 or 310.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the long nineteenth century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 310 and ENG 320 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

42005 TR 4:00-5:50 NING YU

On 19th century nature writing.

 

ENG 311 – Seminar: The 20-21st Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 311 if you have already taken ENG 321 or 311.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the 20-21st century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 311 and ENG 321 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

42006 MWF 4:00-5:50 2:30-3:50 JULIE DUGGER

Odysseys: This course will consider revisions of one of the most adapted Classical works of our times: Homer’s Odyssey. We’ll look at 20th and 21st century translations of the Odyssey into English, then analyze adaptations including Joyce’s Ulysses, Walcott’s Omeros, Atwood’s Penelopiad, the Coens’ Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?, and Mason’s Lost Books of the Odyssey. Questions we will consider include the following:

  • why does the Odyssey appeal to contemporary writers? Why does it lend itself so well to addressing 20th- and 21st-century concerns, including concerns about sociopolitical identity?
  • why has the Odyssey been such a cross-cultural success? What different emphases might we find in an Irish, Caribbean, Canadian, or American Odyssey? And what do these different literatures—as well as the English literary tradition more generally—gain or lose by positioning themselves in relation to the Western Classical tradition?
  • how do the formal and thematic decisions of individual Odyssey translators and adaptors assist them in accomplishing their goals? What are the capacities of different poetic forms? Of an epic, a novel, a film, a short story, a vignette?

 

ENG 313 – Critical Theories/Practices

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

Introduction to a range of critical and cultural theories in a historical context. Emphasis on critical reading and writing in preparation for 400-level courses in literary and cultural studies.

40140 MWF 2:30-3:50 MARK LESTER

Indifference: This course will focus on a series of questions concerning the nature, function, and value of literature: What exactly is a work of literature? (What is it’s ontological status?) How does it work? For whom does it have value? On what grounds should a work of literature be judged or assessed? Should it be conceived of strictly as an object of analysis (something to be interpreted and explained), or does the work of literature possess a distinct dynamic, critical, and constructive dimension of its own? To what kind of knowledge can authors and readers of literary works lay claim? Using Plato as our starting point, we will follow a number of different trajectories that will allow us to explore the intersections of literature ‘proper’ and philosophy, science, and literary analysis. In this section, emphasis will be given to problems surrounding the critical notion of indifference—indisinterestedness, neutrality; apathy, boredom, or passivity; redundancy, repetition, and serialization…

TEXT: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. (Other texts to be announced or made available on Canvas.)

40219 TR 12:00-1:50 MARK LESTER

Desire: This course will focus on a series of questions concerning the nature, function, and value of literature: What exactly is a work of literature? (What is it’s ontological status?) How does it work? For whom does it have value? On what grounds should a work of literature be judged or assessed? Should it be conceived of strictly as an object of analysis (something to be interpreted and explained), or does the work of literature possess a distinct dynamic, critical, and constructive dimension of its own? To what kind of knowledge can authors and readers of literary works lay claim? Using Plato as our starting point, we will follow a number of different trajectories that will allow us to explore the intersections of literature ‘proper’ and philosophy, science, and literary analysis. In this section, we will foreground critical assessments of the relation of literature and desire.

TEXT: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. (Other texts to be announced or made available on Canvas.)

 

ENG 318 – Survey: Early Modern

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 318 if you have already taken ENG 308 or 318.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the Early Modern period with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 308 and ENG 318 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

42028 MWF 8:30-9:50 NICHOLAS MARGARITIS

Renaissance Literature: A survey of the important literary genres composed in England and the Continent during the Renaissance, including lyric poetry, narrative poetry, and drama.  Authors include Petrarch, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Ariosto.  Essay exams.

 

ENG 321 – Survey: The 20-21st Centuries

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 321 if you have already taken ENG 311 or 321.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the 20-21st centuries with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 311 and ENG 321 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

42029 MWF 1:00-2:20 CHRISTOPHER WISE

This course will survey canonical works by major Modernist writers of the 20th century. Course themes will include Modernism, Cubism, Imagism, and the relation of various arts to 20th century literature, including painting, music, film, and ballet. Writers studied will include Flaubert, Joyce, Stein, Hemingway, Proust, Breton, Pound, Kafka, Eliot, Williams, Kundera, and others. Students will write a take-home midterm exam (25%); a formal paper (25%); and an in-class final essay exam (25%). In addition to keeping up with the assigned reading, students will also be expected to regularly attend class, participate in class discussions and group work, including writing a group report. They will also be required to meet with the instructor at least once to consult regarding their final paper topic. Class participation, which includes these things, will also constitute a portion of the total grade (25%).

 

ENG 331 – Gender Theory: Queer Theory

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 or WGSS 211.

This course will examine gender theory, with varying emphases, including but not limited to feminist, queer, trans, intersectional and critical race theory. Repeatable with different topics up to 10 credits including original course. Also offered as WGSS 331.

42030 MWF 1:00-2:20 ELY SHIPLEY

This course examines queer and trans theories. Some topics include histories of sexuality; homophobia and transphobia’s intersection with other forms of oppression, such as sexism, racism, ableism, and classism; queer and trans activism; and representations in literature, art, and popular media. We will explore various disciplinary fields through a range of sources. Further, we will familiarize ourselves with histories of queer and trans experience, community, and identity, and consider the ways in which gender norms affect everyone.

 

ENG 334 – TextsAcrossN.Am/Eur

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Analysis primarily of North American and European texts with engagement in issues of multiculturalism and cultural diversity. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics. May be taken only once for GUR credit.

42735 MWF 2:30-3:50 CATHERINE MCDONALD

Marginalized Stories: Disability Narratives on the Screen and the Page:Name a book or film that includes a character with a disability, someone who is different from others around them—either physically, mentally, or emotionally. Chances are you know a story like that if you stop to think about it. Whether the disabled person is a main character and the plot revolves around their struggle or the person is a side character, the number of literary and cinematic works that represent disability abound, although they may at first not be noticed. Here’s the thing: the way those fictions portray the experience of disability is open to investigation. The real-life person whose body, mind, or emotional systems are not able-bodied rarely recognizes themselves on the screen or page. For marginalized groups outside the mainstream of a culture, and for marginalized identities within a culture, questionable representations in fiction have a detrimental impact.

Using the critical tools of cinema and disability studies, we will interrogate literary and filmic constructions of disability, which too often portray and reproduce misinformed and troubling cultural stereotypes of “others.” Our goal is two-fold: to widen our perspective of the experience of disability, and to analyze cultural attitudes towards people with disabilities that are created and reinforced in imaginary texts.

In an increasingly globalized world, a respect for difference and an understanding of diversity are essential to being an informed member of a multicultural world. One of the purposes of this course, as a GUR that fulfills a global comparative multicultural requirement, is to help students develop a multicultural consciousness and see themselves as part of a community of others. This section of English 334 seeks to do just that. In literary and creative expressions across North America and Europe, we’ll consider marginalized stories: disability narratives on the screen and the page.

 

ENG 335 – Global Texts Outside N.Am&Eur

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Analysis primarily of texts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics.

44187 MWF 4:00-5:20 CATHERINE MCDONALD

Marginalized Stories: Disability Narratives on the Screen and the Page

Name a book or film that includes a character with a disability, someone who is different from others around them—either physically, mentally, or emotionally. Chances are you know a story like that if you stop to think about it. Whether the disabled person is a main character and the plot revolves around their struggle or the person is a side character, the number of literary and cinematic works that represent disability abound, although they may at first not be noticed. Here’s the thing: the way those fictions portray the experience of disability is open to investigation. The real-life person whose body, mind, or emotional systems are not able-bodied rarely recognizes themselves on the screen or page. For marginalized groups outside the mainstream of a culture, and for marginalized  identities within a culture, questionable representations in fiction have a detrimental impact.

Using the critical tools of cinema and disability studies, we will interrogate literary and filmic constructions of disability, which too often portray and reproduce misinformed and troubling cultural stereotypes of “others.” Our goal is two-fold: to widen our perspective of the experience of disability, and to analyze cultural attitudes towards people with disabilities that are created and reinforced in imaginary texts.

In an increasingly globalized world, a respect for difference and an understanding of diversity are essential to being an informed member of a multicultural world. One of the purposes of this course, as a GUR that fulfills a global comparative multicultural requirement, is to help students develop a multicultural consciousness and see themselves as part of a community of others. This section of English 335 seeks to do just that. In literary and creative expressions across Asia and Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America, we’ll consider marginalized stories: disability narratives on the screen and the page.

44021 TR 2:00-3:50 KRISTIANA KAHAKAUWILA

“That the sea is as real as you and I, that it shapes the character of this planet, that it is a major source of our sustenance, that it is something we all share in common wherever we are in Oceania-- all are statements of fact. But above that level of everyday experience, the sea is our pathway to each other and to everyone else, the sea is our endless saga, the sea is our most powerful metaphor, the ocean is in us.” --From “We Are the Ocean” by Epeli Hau`ofa

Literatures of Hawai`i and the Pacific: This course asks you to leave behind the familiarity of continental land and step into a canoe bound for Oceania, or the Pacific Ocean, the largest region in the world. We will navigate via songs and chants, poetry and novels, films and visual art, and will read foundational texts as well as contemporary ones. The primary goal of this course is to introduce Pacific Literature from the perspective of the Pacific. In this iteration of the course, all our works will connect to Hawai`i in some way, so even as we sail the highways and biways of greater Oceania, we will have a home base, with all the complications that “home” implies. 

This is a rigorous class with a rich reading load. As such, it’s a great primer for learning or enhancing your skills in textual analysis, essay writing, layering multiple perspectives, and thinking as a global citizen. All majors are welcome and have something to contribute to the journey.

 

ENG 338 – Women’s Lit N Am and Europe

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Study of women's texts in various cultures primarily of North America and Europe, including thematic and stylistic development within cultural context.

40533 MWF 11:30-12:50 JEANNE YEASTING

CONTENT: This literature course will focus on a range of 19th-21st century women authors. We’ll investigate some of the complex issues underlying their texts, such as colonialism; romantic idealization; domesticity and concepts of home; gender ideals; and class inequality. We’ll examine some of the ways their texts support, explore, challenge, resist, talk back to their cultures.  We’ll also consider some of the ways women writers are inspired by, revise, and respond to other women writers.

ASSIGNMENTS & EVALUATION: Requirements include quizzes, collaborative group projects, exams, reading responses, lots of reading, and lots of thinking.

TEXTS:

  • Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre.  Broadview Press, ed. Richard Nemesvri
  • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea.  W.W. Norton Critical Edition, ed. Judith Raiskin    
  • Warsan Shire, Our Men Do Not Belong to Us.  Abridged e-version
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own. Mariner Books annotated edition   
  • Selected texts on Canvas

 

ENG 347 – Studies in Young Adult Lit

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 or instructor permission.

Studies in literature written for and/or by young adults. May focus on literary history, genres, theme, critical approaches or specific authors. Class assignments and discussion may focus on using this literature with young adults in secondary schools and in a home setting.

40759 MWF 2:30-3:50 NANCY JOHNSON

With a focus on “Identity, Agency, Community” this course invites you to become familiar with diverse genres and formats of literature, from classic to contemporary texts written for teens/young adults (age 14-20).  As you read works by diverse writers, you’ll develop an appreciative eye, an eye toward expanding your aesthetic criteria, and an eye that examines critical judgments established by reviewers and award committees. Throughout the course we will consider whose voices get heard in YA literature and how those voices offer insight into teen lives and experiences. We also explore what makes a “good” book as well as what makes a book “work.” Our work will introduce (or perhaps, re-introduce) you to texts by notable YA authors in many genres, as well as their commentary about writing for young adult audiences.  In lieu of a final, your culminating project will highlight character/identity through a written, visual, creative project.  

EXPECTATIONS: Willingness to think, read, and respond with care, insight, and an openness to issues, formats, and themes that might challenge what you know about literature, your personal tastes as a reader, and what you remember about adolescence. Active, engaged participation is expected.

TOPICS and TEXTS [required]:

  • Classic YA Literature: The Outsiders (S.E. Hinton)
  • Literature of Resilience: Speak (L. H. Anderson)
  • Actions and Consequences: The 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime That
  • Changed Their Lives (D. Slater)
  • The Price of a Perfect World: Scythe (N. Shusterman)

TENTATIVE TOPICS and TEXTS [Required with choice] Please wait to purchase these books until you come to class:

  • Gritty, Edgy, Tough:  How It Went Down (K. Magoon) or The Hate U Give (A. Thomas) or All
  • American Boys (J. Reynolds & B. Kiely) or We Were Here (M. de la Pena)
  • The Cost and Consequences of War: Between Shades of Gray (R. Sepetys) or Code Name
  • Verity (E. Wein) or Never Fall Down (P. McCormick) or The Girl in the Blue Coat (M. Hesse)
  • Identity, Acceptance, Belonging, Love:  Eleanor & Park (R. Rowell) or Aristotle and Dante
  • Discover the Secrets of the Universe (B.A. Saenz) or I’ll Give You the Sun (J. Nelson) or The
  • Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue (M. Lee)
  • YA Award Winners

 

ENG 350 – Intro to Creative Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Examines the fundamentals of at least two genres, such as fiction, nonfiction, playwriting, or poetry. The course will include both lectures, focused on model texts, and workshop-style discussions, focused on student work.

40220 MWF 8:30-9:50 ELIZABETH COLEN

With emphasis on exposure and practice, this course is for students who wish to study, analyze, and experiment with three major genres of creative writing: fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, and techniques specific to each of them. Students will be expected to closely read and analyze published writing, generate their own work every week, effectively and responsively workshop their peers’ writing, and gain proficiency in the art of revision.

TEXTS:

  • Write Moves: A Creative Writing Guide & Anthology - Nancy Pagh

41110 MWF 1:00-2:20 JEANNE YEASTING

This introductory course will focus on creating original creative nonfiction and poetry.  Students will examine the craft of numerous authors, and use their writing as catalysts for generating and revising their own work.  Class will be a mixture of discussion of assigned writing models, writing exercises (including faithful forgeries), and workshopping writing-in-progress. 

ASSIGNMENTS: Assignments will include writing and revising original creative nonfiction and poems; completing craft analyses; and writing reading responses.   Required texts will serve as models for many writing assignments.  Students may be required to work on a collaborative project and/or attend outside literary events.

EVALUATION: Based largely on class participation, completion of assigned writings, and a Final Portfolio Project.

TEXTS:

  • In Short, edited by Judith Kitchen and Mary Paumier Jones
  • 250 Poems: A Portable Anthology, 3rd edition, edited by Peter Schabel and Jack Ridl
  • The Poet’s Companion, edited by Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux
  • Various poems and other texts on Canvas

 

ENG 351 – Intro to Fiction Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Examines the fundamental tools available to writers of fiction: point of view, dialog, characterization and voice. The course introduces the terms and protocol of workshop critique.

40698 MWF 11:30-12:50 KAMI WESTHOFF

This course is designed to introduce you to the craft and culture of writing fiction as well as the complex world of critique and workshop. We will read established authors from various backgrounds and cultures and study the ways in which they make their writing work through unique use of voice, description, language, dialogue, character development, and experimentation. While reading and studying these authors, you will begin your own journey into fiction writing with the help of various writing exercises and assignments, revision, and most importantly, your imagination and individuality.

40819 TR 4:00-5:50 KAMI WESTHOFF

This course is designed to introduce you to the craft and culture of writing fiction as well as the complex world of critique and workshop. We will read established authors from various backgrounds and cultures and study the ways in which they make their writing work through unique use of voice, description, language, dialogue, character development, and experimentation. While reading and studying these authors, you will begin your own journey into fiction writing with the help of various writing exercises and assignments, revision, and most importantly, your imagination and individuality.

44200 MWF 11:30-12:50 ELIZABETH COLEN

A dozen takes on the short story form. In this introductory fiction course, students will analyze all aspects of the short story form, including plot, point of view, characterization, setting, and conflict, as well as the sonic qualities of language; learn how these tools are combined to best effect in the service of storytelling; develop a language for discussing the interplay of a writer’s craft and content; and engage with weekly writing exercises. The final project will be a portfolio that includes 10-15 pages of one fully revised, well-crafted story.

 

ENG 353 – Introduction to Poetry Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. 

Introduction to the techniques of poetry writing, including craft, practice and modeling.

40141 MWF 10:00-11:20 ELY SHIPLEY

This generative writing course focuses on the practice of reading and writing poetry. We work from the basis that in order to become better writers, we also must become better readers. We will explore a range of poetic traditions and contemporary developments and spend the semester reading, writing, and discussing poetry through focusing on elements such as metaphor, image, rhythm, sound, line, and dramatic tension. Students will be responsible for offering thoughtful readings of professional models, as well as submitting poetry writing exercises. We become better writers through reading, thinking and feeling intensely, learning from our own work, the work of others, and above all, by practicing.

 

ENG 354 – Intro to Creative Nonfict Writ

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

An introductory course in writing nonfiction prose, such as personal essay, memoir, autobiography, travel writing, and other forms.

40142 TR 2:00-3:50 CHRISTOPHER PATTON

“Creative nonfiction” is a funny term. It says what it is by saying what it’s not. It’s non-fiction, not made up, not counterfeit—answerable “not merely to the writ­er’s imagination,” as one essayist puts it, “but to a world beyond the page.” And yet, being creative, it selects and arranges, shapes and forms, the materials of a lived life, so that the reader is offered not a transcript but a testament—a loaf of good bread, not some lump of dough. Our concern this quarter will be such transformation, from the raw stuff of lived experience, to the lively shapeliness of art. Over ten weeks we’ll explore three modes of metamorphosis: the memoir, begun from memory and experience; the speculative essay, wandering and wondering; and the formal venture, anchored in adopted or invented forms, an index, a personal ad, a braided loaf of bread. Count on a lot of writing exercises, close reading of published essays, and thoughtful responses to your work and that of your peers. Grades will be based on assigned exercises, a writing journal, a fifth hour project, a final portfolio, and active and generous participation. Texts: Miller and Paola, Tell It Slant; Williford and Martone, Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction.

 

ENG 364 – Introduction to Film Studies

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Overview of the conventions and techniques of narrative cinema with some readings in film theory.

40426 MWF 11:30-12:50 FILM SCREENINGS: R 4:00-6:50 EREN ODABASI

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the key components of film expression such as cinematography, sound, editing, and production design. We will closely analyze several canonical films from around the world, utilizing the fundamental concepts and definitions covered in the course units. Furthermore, we will explore cinema’s relationship to other arts and various media forms. There will also be a video production project that will further enrich our understanding of how films are put together.

TEXTS

  • David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, Jeff Smith. Film Art: An Introduction, 11th edition. New York, NY: McGraw Hill Education, 2015.

FILMS

  • City Lights, directed by Charles Chaplin, 1931
  • 8 1/2, directed by Federico Fellini, 1963
  • The Conversation, directed by Francis Ford Coppola, 1974
  • Chungking Express, directed by Wong Kar Wai, 1994
  • Pina, directed by Wim Wenders, 2011
  • The Grand Budapest Hotel, directed by Wes Anderson, 2014

 

ENG 365 – Film Hist:Animation to 1960

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 364 or ENG 202.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of films belonging to a particular period in film history. Repeatable with different topics up to ten credits including original course.

42040 TR 10:00-11:50 FILM SCREENINGS: W 5:00-7:50 TONY PRICHARD

This course will examine animation from its earliest manifestations in cinema up to the “financial disaster” of Walt Disney’s Sleeping Beauty and role of animation in the new burgeoning medium of Television.

TEXTS

  • Crafton, Donald. Before Mickey: The Animated Film 1898-1928.
  • Klein, Norman O. 7 Minutes: The Life and Death of The American Animated Cartoon.
  • Leslie, Esther. Hollywood Flatlands: Animation, Critical Theory, and the Avant-Garde.
  • Sammond, Nicholas. Birth of an Industry: Blackface Minstrelsy and the Rise of American Animation.

 

ENG 370 – Introduction to Language

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Overview of language structure and use. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, how language is acquired, and how it changes over space and time. Emphasis on English as a global language.

40143 TR 2:00-3:50 PAM HARDMAN

This course will introduce students to the key principles of linguistics and the cultural use of language. We will start by examining the fundamentals of semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. We will then explore issues of regional, racial and gender differences, dialect variation, language acquisition, and historical change. We’ll look at language as a complex, messy, ever-changing part of human experience.

ASSIGNMENTS:  Mid-term and final exams; written projects; exercise sets

TEXTS:  O’Grady et al., Contemporary Linguistics 7th ed.; course documents on Canvas

40221 TR 12:00-1:50 PAM HARDMAN

CONTENT:  This course will introduce students to the key principles of linguistics and the cultural use of language. We will start by examining the fundamentals of semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. We will then explore issues of regional, racial and gender differences, dialect variation, language acquisition, and historical change. We’ll look at language as a complex, messy, ever-changing part of human experience.

ASSIGNMENTS:  Mid-term and final exams; written projects; exercise sets

TEXTS:  O’Grady et al., Contemporary Linguistics 7th ed.; course documents on Canvas

40676 TR 2:00-3:50 ANNE LOBECK

This course is intended to help you develop a broad understanding of human language. It is not intended to teach you how to speak or write better, but the course should help you recognize an uninformed statement about language when you hear one. You will be learning some definitions and symbols to use during the course to help you understand some of the components of the system of language. The purpose of learning these is to help you develop a sharper ear for language, a better understanding of its nature, and a livelier interest in all its manifestations.

More immediately, the objectives of the course are:

  • to lead you to examine your own linguistic beliefs and attitudes;
  • to make you aware of the diversity of language systems and their fundamental similarities;
  • to acquaint you with a few of the subfields of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and language history;
  • to equip you with some tools and techniques for linguistic analysis in order to help you discover the organizing principles of English;
  • to acquaint you with the basic concepts necessary to further pursue the study of the English language (and/or other languages) if you wish to.

REQUIRED TEXT: Linguistics for Everyone, by Kristin Denham and Anne Lobeck. Cengage, 2013 Second Edition (green)

GRADING AND EVALUATION: Grades will be based on participation, weekly homework assignments, 2 exams, short essays, both group and individual work.

 

ENG 371: Inro Rhet: Public Humanities

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. Junior status.

Introduction to rhetorical theories and analysis.

42747 MWF 10:00-11:20 JEREMY CUSHMAN

Public Humanities: This course grapples with one of the more pressing question that students in the Humanities seemingly can't escape: "What are you going to do with a degree in English, or in History, or Philosophy, or really any field in the Humanities?" Of course, we all know that just underneath that question is a much harsher question: "Why are you wasting your time and money?" It's a tough question to grapple with because the answers are personal, context-dependent, and often pretty darn complicated. It's also a tough question because many students don't yet have language or experience to articulate the value and relevance of literary insight, critical analysis, and textual production. So, together, we're going to practice and reflect on the rhetorical competencies that permeate 21st-century knowledge work and advocacy--the kind of work you can do well because of your Humanities degree. We are going to engage in what increasingly gets called Public Humanities. Such engagement, I hope, will help you students invent powerful and personal responses to that rather tired question about what a degree in the Humanities is good for.

To really get after an engagement with Public Humanities, the class is divided into two overlapping parts:

  1. We'll first explore the differing and coexistent approaches to how language and communication work across democratic life. For example, does language simply transmit knowledge from one stable place (or mind) to another? Does language represent the world as it already is? Do words create the worlds in which we act? Are there even tighter, more coextensive relationships among language, action, and things? The answer to the all of these questions is both yes and no. We'll work through the implications of these questions in terms of a democratic, ethical public and in terms of professional value (i.e. jobs, careers, and fulfillment).
  2. Fairly quickly into the quarter, you'll start work on a large "public advocacy project."  This multipart project is designed to help you practice Humanities work. So you'll collect and build meaning into data, write and design materials that articulate a public issue or organization, and communicate with varying and changing publics. The goal here is to figure out how best to use new (and old) media to tell stories that make a difference and motivate action. The project is designed to help you cultivate habits of a critical, insightful, and professional communicator working in increasingly collaborative, free-form, and mediated environments. Throughout the project you'll practice:
  • Designing and implementing interviews
  • Writing and analyzing field notes
  • ‘Reading’ contrasting organization stories
  • Writing professional and technical stories
  • Writing stories for (and with) social media
  • And, of course,;Articulating the value, relevance, and crucial (even ethical) importance of a degree in the Humanities

 

ENG 410 – Studies in Literary History

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371.

A wide variety of studies in literary history. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics.

44032 MWF 11:30-12:50 CHRISTOPHER WISE

This course will explore the literary history of American expatriate writers in Tangier, Morocco in the 20th century, including Paul Bowles, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs. We will also study the writings and musicology of Bowles, including collaborations with Brian Jones and the Rolling Stones, as well as the writings of Jane Bowles, Brion Bysin, Mohamed Mrabet, Jean Genet, Ahmed Yacoubi, Peter Orlovsky, Abdelsam Boulaich, Truman Capote, Mohamed Choukri, Tennessee Williams, and others associated with Bowles and the Beats. Students will work in groups and perform writing assignments, including in-class writing, a final essay exam, and a formal paper. Attendance is required.

 

ENG 418 – Sr Sem:

Prerequisites & Notes: Senior Status; ENG 313 and one from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, or ENG 311. Important note: ENG 418 is not repeatable & cannot be used as an elective for the literature major.

An advanced seminar offering an in-depth exploration of specialized topics. Requires students to develop scholarly projects integrating course material with their own literary, historical, and theoretical interests. This course is not repeatable.

40615 MWF 1:00-2:20 LYSA RIVERA

Chicanx Literature: On February 2, 1848, the United States and Mexico ratified the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, officially ending the Mexican-American War (1846-8) and turning most of Northern Mexico into what is now the U.S. southwest. To those who chose to remain on “territories previously belonging to Mexico,” but who had no intention of “retaining the character of Mexicans,” the treaty promised “the enjoyment of all the rights of citizens of the United States, according to the principles of the Constitution,” “protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty and property, and secured in the free exercise of their religion without restriction.” This course examines how various writers across various historical periods have turned to literature to respond to the failure of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in securing their civil rights as Mexican-Americans (Chicanos/as). We will grapple with racially ambivalent narrators of the assimilationist “Mexican-American Era” (1930s); duke it out with the notoriously irreverent pachucos of 1940s L.A., march alongside the Chicano activists of el movimiento (late 1960s); and consider, at the end of the quarter, what contemporary Chicano/a writers wrestle with in what is considered by some to be a “post-Chicano” historical moment.

40616 TR 2:00-3:50 NING YU

On environmental literature.

 

ENG 423 – Maj Auth: Gwendolyn Brooks

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371; possible additional prerequisites relevant to topic.

Studies in the texts of a writer or writers in English or in translation. Repeatable once as an elective with different authors.

40618 MWF 10:00-11:20 STAFANIA HEIM

Gwendolyn Brooks

“From the first it had been like a

Ballad. It had the beat inevitable. It had the blood.”

Deep study of great Chicago poet Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000) challenges easy narratives about 20th century American poetry, women’s poetry, black poetry, and political poetry. Brooks published her first poem when she was 13 years old and went on to become the first black writer to win the Pulitzer Prize. She received great acclaim during her life and almost every major poetry prize. Her widely anthologized “We Real Cool” has inspired an entirely new poetic form. Brooks’s writing is at once formally rigorous and wildly original, both social document and steeped in myth (she re-wrote the Aeneid with a black woman in the hero’s role). In 1967 (when she was 50 years old), she turned away from her mainstream press—and the success and wide readership that came with it—to publish with small black presses and support the political and artistic energies of younger radical writers. In this course we will attend closely to Brooks’s sonic, rhythmic, and narrative richness as well as to the historical, social, and political contexts she is in dialogue with. We will read her major works—books of poems including A Street in Bronzeville, In the Mecca, and Riot, and her novel, Maud Martha—as well as the recent outpouring of responses to her work and reconsiderations of her position in the canon of American literature. Course assignments will include close readings; a research paper that will undergo peer review, feedback, and revision; and creative and collaborative responses. 
 

 

ENG 427 – Queer Studies

Prerequisites & Notes: One course from: ENG 227, ENG 313, ENG 351, ENG 353, ENG 354 or equivalent prerequisite coursework and instructor approval; and junior status.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of the representation of sexuality in a range of texts with an emphasis on same-sex desire and works by Queer writers.

44033 MWF 8:30-9:50 KELLY MAGEE

The focus of this course will be the contemporary queer memoir: works of narrative nonfiction that examine queer experience, especially as it intersects with other forms of identity. Memoir, itself, is a fluid genre that employs a variety of storytelling forms and techniques to re-imagine the past and arrive at new truths; as such, it’s an important medium for queer writers to challenge heteronormative assumptions and structures. But what is a “queer memoir”? What is the relationship between memory and identity? What freedoms does this genre give queer voices, and what limitations does it pose? How do these memoirs engage in discourses of self-articulation, and how do they complicate notions of collective identity? How do they redefine things like family, home, and culture? The writing in this course will be in two modes: analytical responses to the memoirs and the creation of a scholarly personal essay of your own. Texts will include memoirs by Rigoberto Gonzalez, Maggie Nelson, Myriam Gurba, and others.

 

ENG 436 – The Structure of English

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 370 or instructor permission.

Introduction to English sentence structure. Topics include clause structure, modification, complementation, and syntactic principles such as movement, coordinating and pronominalization.

44081 TR 10:00-11:50 ANNE LOBECK

 

ENG 442 – Studies in Literacy

Prerequisites & Notes: One course from ENG 301, ENG 302, ENG 370, ENG 371 or instructor approval.

Examines shifting definitions of literacy and literacy practices from social, cultural, historical, and technological perspectives.

41604 MWF 11:30-12:50 DONNA QUALLEY

What is Literacy? That’s a question that we’re going to figure out! According to literacy researcher, Deborah Brandt, literacy today is measured not by our ability to read and write, but rather “by our continuing capacity to navigate and amalgamate new reading and writing practices in response to rapid cultural, social, and technological change.” Given the largeness and complexity of the material and electronic worlds with which we currently interact, most people will need to continue to develop multiple, diverse literacy practices throughout their lives.


Today, new literacies emerge and accumulate, mix, and morph with older literacies, and recede or fade at faster and faster rates. The same conditions that spur a flurry and flowering of creative invention and production in some quarters can also engender a precipitous fear and anxiety of a literacy in decline in others. Plato claimed that writing would be the death of memory and thought. Today, it is print-based practices that are thought to be imperiled by digital media. Are the skill sets and mindsets that using digital media require merely a new kind of literacy? Or are they something else entirely? This is one of the questions we will take up in the second half of the course as we glimpse into the technological, institutional, and ideological apparatus called “Electracy.” Are we in the midst of a tectonic shift that may be as significant as the one from orality to literacy 2000 years ago?

In this writing studies course, we’ll use both print and digital technologies to navigate different literacy landscapes to explode common understandings of what literacy is and what literacy does (for whom and to whom). You’ll write, design, invent, and make throughout the course, working in different media for different kinds of audiences.

 

ENG 443 – Tch Eng Lang Arts in Sec Sch I

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 301 or ENG 302; ENG 347; ENG 350; ENG 370; and two from ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, and ENG 311. Major restrictions are never lifted.

Survey of theory, practice, resources and methods of assessment for the teaching of English language arts.

40956 MWF 8:30-9:50 BRUCE GOEBEL

This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence that is designed to help you become a thoughtful, knowledgeable, and effective teacher of English language arts at the secondary level.  In this first quarter, we emphasize the teaching of writing, though oral performance, literature, and media will be integrally linked.  Through the frames of pedagogical theories, we will connect what we know about the diverse student population that secondary teachers face with what we know about ourselves as language arts learners and teachers in order to create useable teaching materials.  This is a writing and reading intensive course.  This methods course requires the same kind of individual initiative, dedication, and professionalism that you will apply to your future work as a teacher.

ASSIGNMENTS:

  • Misc. Writing Responses
  • Summary-Review-Best Ideas Book Response
  • Written Mini-Lesson and Performance
  • Exam
  • Sequenced Writing Activities Project

 

ENG 444 – Tch Eng Lang Arts in Sec Sch II

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 443.

Continuation of the survey of theory, practice, resources and methods of assessment for the teaching of English language arts. This course may include a two-week, one period a day teaching practicum in a middle or high school.

40427 MWF 10:00-11:20 BRUCE GOEBEL

This course is the second of a two-quarter sequence that is designed to help you become a thoughtful, knowledgeable, and effective teacher of English language arts at the secondary level.  While ENG 443 focused primarily on the teaching of composition, this second course focuses on the teaching of skills related to reading, interpretation, and the critical analysis of literature and other media.  In addition, this course will also attend to the specifics of lesson and unit planning for the English language arts classroom.  Through the frames of a variety of pedagogical theories, you will connect what you know about the diverse student population that secondary teachers face with what you know about yourselves as language arts learners and teachers in order to discover what methods might work best for you and your future students. 

This methods course requires the same kind of individual initiative, dedication, and professionalism that you will apply to your future work as a teacher, so please show me your best. 

ASSIGNMENTS:

  • Discussion Plan and Performance
  • Reading Module*
  • Smarter Balanced Quiz*
  • Exam
  • Novel Unit Plan*
  • Film Studies Unit*
  • Ekphrastic Poem-Image
  • Comparison
  • Media Unit*
  • 1st Lesson Plan
  • Semester Plan

*Collaborative Small Group Assignments

 

ENG 451 – Creative Wrtng Seminar: Fiction

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 351.

An advanced course in the writing of fiction. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 cr.

40536 MWF 11:30-12:50 KELLY MAGEE

This course will focus on genre-bending short stories, such as those that incorporate elements of sci-fi, fantasy, and horror into literary fiction. We’ll look at how fiction can use elements of the unreal to comment on the living world, producing imaginative stories that engage with real issues. A driving question of the course will be, What motivates characters in fiction? What motivates you to write? What motivates people to act the ways they do? How can you use motivation to find depth and create empathy for your characters? We’ll spend the quarter thinking and writing in a variety of forms, from love stories to ghost stories. We’ll discuss advanced methods of crafting narrative, including writing with urgency and breathlessness, using techniques like defamiliarization, escalation, and amplification to heighten the reader’s experience, and using restrictions like word count, sentence style, and time limits to tap into new creative pathways. The course will culminate in a 10-15 page portfolio, modeled on the types of submissions writers often do after graduation.

40826 TR 12:00-1:50 KAMI WESTHOFF

This course is designed to encourage you to continue your exploration into the complex world of creating literary fiction. We will read the work of contemporary fiction writers and examine the ways in which they create compelling and innovative fiction through careful and unique attention to such elements as character development, setting, theme, format, and narrative focus. In addition to creating complex and ambitious work, you will engage in various projects aimed at connecting you to other aspects of the world of publishing literary fiction. The course's content will focus on various iterations of captivity in contemporary literature. 

 

ENG 453 – Creative Wrtng Seminar: Poetry

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 353.

An advanced course providing disciplined expression in a variety of modes of writing poetry. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 cr.

40471 MWF 10:00-11:20 JANE WONG

Toward Curiosity, Community, and Stakes in Contemporary Poetry

“Poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action.” - Audre Lorde

English 453 offers you an opportunity to sharpen your creative skills and spend dedicated time close reading the work of other poets – particularly your fellow poets in class. This course asks you to experiment with different craft moves through generative writing, delve deeper into the particularities of poet’s work, reflect on rigorous revision and feedback, and articulate your own poetics! You will be writing poems, offering feedback for your peers, exploring the work of single authors in-depth, and crafting a poetics essay or artist statement. Some questions we will wrestle with throughout the quarter include: how can we “enter” a poem? Where is the “heart” of the poem? What formal techniques do poets employ (or break) and why? What is the relationship between form and content? What are the stakes of poetry today? When someone asks you the question “what do you write about?” (and they always will), how will you respond? We will examine the craft of poetry (forms, lineation, rhythm, repetition, word play, image, metaphor, hybrid forms, etc.) in context of much larger discussions of poetics: why poems exist, how they create and resist meaning, how they create different experiences for readers and why. In addition to writing our own poems, we will engage critical essays on poetics as helpful frameworks (i.e. essays and letters from poets such as Audre Lorde, Federico Garcia Lorca, Emily Dickinson, Ross Gay, Aimé Césaire, and more), focus on the work of rising/prominent contemporary poets, and craft a chapbook collection as a culmination of our creative risk-taking. English 453 seeks to consider poetry not as a dusty old book, but as something alive, current, and full of potential today!

 

ENG 454 – Creative Wrtg Sem: Nonfiction

Prerequisites & Notes: 354. 

An advanced workshop course in the writing of nonfiction, building on skills learned in prior courses. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 cr.

40537 TR 2:00-3:50 NANCY PAGH

This advanced creative nonfiction writing course will build on the fundamentals of excellent writing established in the introductory course, and have students read and write actively in emergent forms that are defining the creative nonfiction literary scene today. The class will begin writing two to five short-short or “flash” nonfiction pieces, developing a strong familiarity with this genre and its conventions, including building on myth and other pre-existing story, the “life rolled up” piece, borrowed forms, and more. Then students will focus on topical nonfiction—nonfiction drawing on research—using as a model Mary Roach’s hilarious (yet serious) exploration of the search for proof of the afterlife, Spook. Finally, students will choose a new medium in which to work for their final project, one that incorporates multimedia or digital awareness: choices for this project will be blogs, graphic memoir, hypermedia/hypertext, or multimedia essay using imagery in a provocative way (we will discuss how to find the support you need if you want to try digital media), as we will explore in examples from writers such as Eula Biss in “The Pain Scale” and Dinty Moore. We will have workshops, in-class writings, and reading of model work.

Required textbooks:

  • 978-0399563300 Knausgaard, Autumn
  • 978-1501107832  Parker, Dear Mister You
  • 978-1555973049  Sutin, A Postcard Memoir
  • 978-1555976903  Rankine, Citizen

 

Recommended Textbook:

  • 978-0071781770  Miller/Paola, Tell It Slant (any edition)

 

ENG 456 – Fictions Wrtg: Art of Failure

Prerequisites & Notes: 351.

Intensive reading, writing and workshops in one or more specific modes of fiction, such as fantasy, flash fiction, or adapting fictional works to other media. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 credits, including original course.

40680 MWF 1:00-2:20 CAROL GUESS

The Art of Failure: This is a writing workshop on the art of failure. Questions for exploration include: How do books fail readers? How do readers fail books? How does the creative writing workshop invite or ward off failure? How can artists incorporate failure into the creative process? How can art crafted from failure be successful? We'll examine several texts by contemporary writers that use failure as the starting point for an experimental aesthetic. Assignments include two stories and a presentation to the class. 

 

ENG 458 – Nonfiction Wrtg: Hermit Crabs

Prerequisites & Notes: 354.

Intensive reading, writing and workshop in one or more specific modes of nonfiction, such as memoir, travel writing, autobiography and the personal essay. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 credits, including original course.

40568 TR 10:00-11:50 BRENDA MILLER

Named after the creatures that inhabit the shells of other mollusks to survive, the “Hermit Crab” essay borrows forms from the outside world to inhabit for the duration of the piece. You may have been introduced to this specialized form in other creative nonfiction classes; for this course we will devote the entire quarter to explore the wide variety of ways authors can “borrow” already existing structures for their own work.

TEXT:

  • The Shell Game: Writers Play with Borrowed Forms,  ed. Kim Adrian (University of Nebraska Press, 2018)

 

ENG 459 – Editing and Publishing

Prerequisites & Notes: 351, 353, 354.

Intensive reading, writing and workshop in one or more specific modes of nonfiction, such as memoir, travel writing, autobiography and the personal essay. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 credits, including original course.

40820 MWF 4:00-5:20 LEE GULYAS

This is a capstone course that offers an overview of publishing in the United States. We will explore the history of publishing; the wide variety of publishing houses and presses; literary careers and the business of publishing; and the literary Northwest.

Course Goals

As upper level writing students, you will explore the world of publishing and its place in our culture. Through readings, discussion, guest speakers, and practice you will:

  • Be introduced to skills including research, sources, copyediting, and proofreading, and be aware of the current literary conversation, discourses, and cultures of editing and publishing.
  • Consider writing from the perspective of writer, editor, and publisher within the context of the industry, and be familiar with the roles of each.
  • Understand how a book is made—from inception, to production, distribution, and promotion.
  • Be familiar with some of the ethical issues and current trends in publishing, the politics of book buying, and how to engage and flourish as a member of a larger literary community.
  • Actively work to increase your knowledge and skills and aim for professional standards.

Texts

  • Eckstut, Arielle, and David Sterry. The Essential Guide For Getting Your Book Published, How To Write It, Sell It, and Market It—Successfully! New York Workman Pub., 2015.
  • O’Conner, Patricia. Woe Is I: The Grammarphobe’s Guide To Better English In Plain English, 3rd ed. New York: Riverhead, 2010.

 

ENG 460 – Multi-GenreWrtg:

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 351, 353,  or 354.

Intensive study of topics in creative writing that cross genre boundaries, or that critique those boundaries. Opportunities to compose experimental or hybrid works. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 credits.

40681 TR 12:00-1:50 BRUCE BEASLEY

Emily Dickinson famously wrote that for years her dictionary had been her “only companion.” In this seminar we will plunge into the mysteries of the word: its multiplicities, self-contradictions, etymologies, through a series of improvisational experiments in paying homage to the word in poetry, short prose, and hybrid genres. We’ll write from unfamiliar words, write poems and experimental prose pieces based on highly particular vocabularies and word-heaps, invent words, develop a series of exercises responding to pages in unabridged dictionaries and thesauruses, draw words out of hats, trade words, invent new syntaxes, explore radical ways of giving new life to words through writings of modernist and postmodernist poets and prose writers who have, like Gertrude Stein, especially liked “the feeling of words doing as they want to do and as they have to do when they live where they have to live.” We’ll delve into Language poetics, Oulipo experimentation, and experimental fiction and nonfiction works in which words take subject matter for a wild ride.  

44188 MWF 8:30-9:50 CHRISTOPHER PATTON

Art of Compost: When you make compost you break down old forms to make new forms. From banana peels and lawn clippings you grow a lemon tree. From street signs and Twitter feeds you grow a poem or a lyric essay. In this class you’ll turn fairytales inside-out. You’ll burrow wormwise through your own prose in search of a hidden meaning. You’ll build a poem out of physical objects. What you won’t do is stare at a blank page or screen trying to figure out what on earth to say. You’re life’s already a perfect poem, a perfect story, a perfect meditation, you just need to compose it a bit. Expect wild readings, loopy fruitful exercises, blog and chapbook projects, pleasures of a shared enterprise with likeminded folk. Texts will include Anne Carson’s Sappho translations, Emily Dickinson’s envelope poems, Ronald Johnson’s erasure of Paradise Lost, John Berger on the Chauvet caves, whatever the blogosphere coughs up, and a smattering of recent chapbooks.

 

ENG 462 – Prof Wrtg: Public Sphere

Prerequisites & Notes: One course from ENG 301, ENG 302, ENG 371; or equivalent experience and instructor approval.

A rhetorical examination of various specific topics confronting technical and professional writers in a rapidly changing technological world. Topics change annually. Repeatable once.

42058 TR 4:00-5:50 NICOLE BROWN

The public sphere is the social space where different opinions are expressed, problems of general concern are discussed, and collective solutions are developed through communication. Traditionally, the public sphere is the socially constructed place for societal communication.

Through the course you will develop a broad understanding of the rhetorical contexts involved in writing for different publics and purposes within the public sphere, employing a range of genres and technologies to engage with contemporary topics or special subjects important to you.

Moving university writing beyond academic discourse and into larger public spheres is the focus of this course. It involves negotiating a range of genres and mediums determined by the needs and expectations of a range of publics and purpose. 

Through the course, we will undertake a comprehensive survey of different genres of writing in the public sphere — from academic writing, public commentary and journalism; to writing for museum and gallery displays and catalogues; to writing for performance, television and film; as well as technical and instructional writing. Through these genres we will explore what does it mean to “write” today. 

The course will also have a strong focus on the changing nature of the field of editing and publishing. 

 

ENG 464 – Film Stds:African-Amer. Film

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 364 or instructor permission.  

Examines various specific topics in film studies and theory. Repeatable once with different topics.

40682 MWF 2:30-3:50 FILM SCREENINGS M 4:00-6:50 TONY PRICHARD

This course will examine African-American Film over the cinema’s history. We will look closely at filmmakers and the conditions of production and distribution during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries

TEXTS

  • Diawara, Manthia. (ed.) Black American Cinema.
  • Field, Allyson Nadia. Uplift Cinema: The Emergence of African American Film and the Possibility of Black Modernity.


    Gillespie, Michael Boyce. Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film. Stewart.
    Jacqueline Najuma. Migrating to the Movies: Cinema and Black Urban Modernity.

ENG 501 – Literary Theories & Practices

40003 TR 10:00-11:50 CHRISTOPHER LOAR

This foundational course will introduce MA and MFA students to literary theories and criticism, as well as to foundational skills and knowledges necessary for literary research, such as database searches, working with archival material, and the composition of specialized academic genres such as the prospectus and annotated bibliography. We will examine a range of critical approaches (from the classical period to the present).

Course work will include reading a wide range of theoretical essays; participating in class discussions and presentations; contributing actively to small group work; and writing in several distinct academic genres.

 

ENG 513 – Seminar in Tchg College Comp

Prerequisites & Notes: appointment as a teaching assistant or instructor permission.

Offered once a year in the fall.

40165 TR 2:00-3:50 ANDREW LUCCHESI

Many folks in the field of Rhetoric & Composition have called this an impossible course. That might seem strange because this is simply a practicum for graduate students in the teaching of college composition. Why dub it impossible? For lots of reasons, I suppose. I can’t list them all here, but a good way to start thinking about this impossibility is simply to try and define “composition” for yourself. What does it mean in a 21st century classroom? What’s the process underlying composing? What does a composition look like? In other words, how does one learn to teach relatively new college students a diverse activity that is also a kind of nebulous noun. It’s hard to say exactly how one does such a thing. 

Still, much of this class is to recognize that impossibility and proclaim “challenge accepted!” We’ll look to historical definitions of composition and we’ll put those up against more contemporary questions and concerns as we work to better understand what you are doing in your own composition classrooms. What that means is that, together, we’ll try on some of the assignments that our students do, we’ll ask questions and write responses concerning how and why we might create better assignments, and we’ll reflect on the place of our college composition course in the field of Rhetoric & Composition and in our own university. What’s more, we’ll spend a good deal of time together working through the relationship between rhetorical theory and composition pedagogy. The goal here is to ground both your thinking about composition and your developing pedagogical style in the imaginative and productive questions that, I think, grow out of a sincere engagement with rhetoric (both ancient and contemporary takes).

Clearly, it’s a busy class. And while teaching composition may very well be impossible, we’ll still build a few practical paths through the strange project of being a teacher and a graduate student. 

 

ENG 520 – Studies in Poetry

44038 TR 8:00-9:50 BRUCE BEASLEY

Stephanie Strickland wrote that “Poems are words that take you through three kinds of doors: closed doors, secret doors, and doors you don’t know are there.” In this seminar we bang on all three doors and see who opens. We will explore the oblique and mysterious logics and unlogics of lyric poetry in the context of the parable, the paradox, the koan, and other forms and rhetorical structures that resist the linear and the rational in favor of the unsayable, undecideable, interdeterminable, overdetermined, and multiple. Reading individual poems from throughout the history of poetry and into recent avant-garde experimentation, we will read widely (and improvisationally) in poetry and poetics, experiencing how, as Seamus Heaney puts it, “Poetry is born out of the superfluity of language’s own resources and energy.  It’s a kind of overdoing it.  Enough is not enough when it comes to poetry.”

This seminar is itself a kind of paradox or oxymoron, as we’ll be reading poems critically and criticizing poems poetically.  During each seminar we will intensively examine a wide range of poets and poems, trying out various ways of responding through theory, criticism, and poetry to what engages us in the poems, and in the classes that follow we will respond to some of those poems (and issues in poetics raised by our seminar discussions) through various radical reactions to those poems.  Those reactions may take the form of critical essays, of poems that talk back to the poems we’re investigating, of hybrid forms of poetry and critical writing, and various not-yet-invented forms and structures of dialogue with the poems. 

 

ENG 525 – Studies in Fiction

44039 TR 12:00-1:50 KRISTIANA KAHAKAUWILA

Who's In Charge Around Here?: On Communal, Authorial & Narratorial Custody: For most artists, the work we create stems from personal, familial, genealogical, place-based, political, technological, communal and/or other (hi)stories. How do we honor and where do we re-imagine those (hi)stories in our own work? If we are custodians of the (hi)stories out of which we write, what can we share and what remains hidden? We'll start the course by learning about the Hawaiian literary practice of kaona and use it as we weave in other ideas of authorial control and custody. Questions we'll ask of our writing and ourselves will include: Am I maker or merely listener? Do I call on the muse, or does the muse command me? And how are these fun "writer woo-woo" questions tied to techniques of production and craft? We'll beg an answer via a study of narratorial control, free indirect discourse, narrative custody, and profluence, just to name a few, even as we ask how and why these craft notions garner more critical attention than others.

We'll read amazing work from multiple genres including poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and visual art. We'll intertwine theory, craft, and our own creative production as a means for considering how we produce and why and for whom. We'll be scholar-writers, and the class will be structured to welcome MAs and MFAs, poets and prosers, those interested in Indigenous and Euro-American craft theory of the 20th and 21st centuries, artists of all kinds.

I’m still tinkering with the reading list so if there are questions of craft or artistry arising for you right now, come chat. We can build those into the course.

 

ENG 560: BRIT LITS: Empire/Globalization

42585 TR 4:00-5:50 KATHERINE ANDERSON

Empire and Globalization in British Literature: In the nineteenth century, Britain was the dominant superpower, claiming the “sun never set” on her vast empire because it stretched around the globe. This course investigates empire and global migration as manifested in British literature and culture from the nineteenth century up to the present, focusing on geographical locations that were touched by the British Empire and remain affected by Western imperialism and/or neo-imperialism in our contemporary postcolonial age: the West Indies, India and Pakistan, the Pacific, and Africa. We will consider depictions of the Empire ranging from the “uncharted” colonial territories and settler farms of South Africa to the urban spaces of London and Lahore. Along the way, we’ll incorporate attention to empire’s entanglements with race, class, gender and sexuality, and other forms of personal identity for both the colonized and the colonizers. Some of the questions we will consider include: How did social positioning (such as class, race, or gender identity), affect experiences of empire and migration in the nineteenth century versus today? What is the relationship of narrative to empire and expansion? How does form or genre affect a depiction of empire, or relatedly, of migration or diaspora? How did imperialism shape these various colonies, and in return, how did empire seep into the domestic space and consequently reshape Britain? What are the contemporary scholarly conversations about empire, globalization, neo-imperialism, and neo-liberalism, and what might we have to add?

This course is designed to do two things: to give you an in-depth understanding of the literature, issues, and developments of the nineteenth-century British Empire and its relevance to contemporary issues of postcolonialism and globalization, and to equip you with the professional skills you will need going forward. Part of your professional skill set includes reflexivity; it behooves you to be aware of developments in your specific field and in your greater discipline, and to be able to situate your own scholarship and methodologies in relation to those developments. A related aspect of your professional skill set requires reflexivity in relation to pedagogy: how and why do you teach the way you do? We’ll address both aspects of professionalism in this course. Assignments will consist of participation, a teaching presentation and syllabus, an op-ed piece, and an article-length final paper.

Texts may include: Brontë, Jane Eyre; Coetzee, Disgrace; Haggard, She; Lessing, The Grass is Singing; Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea; Schreiner, The Story of an African Farm; Seacole, The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands; Shamsie, Burnt Shadows; Smith, White Teeth; Stevenson, The Ebb-Tide.