Minors/Other

Minors

Courses taken for credit in minor programs may not be counted toward English majors.

English (25 credits)
Introduction/What is the Study of English?
The study of English offers students the opportunity to study and work with texts that have shaped, and been shaped by, the English language. We offer a diverse spectrum of classes ranging from antiquity to the twenty-first century and covering a wide variety of topics in literature, media, composition, and language studies. English courses encompass and explore multiple cultural traditions, allowing students to cultivate skills in critical thinking, creative expression, close reading, persuasive writing, and effective speaking.

Why Consider an English Minor? 
An English Minor provides you with three essential tools for success in a wide range of careers: the ability to read critically, write clearly and specifically, and understand the ideas and experiences that shape the histories of our local, national and global communities.  Employers and professions of all kinds value such abilities and look for those who have them.

Requirements:
25 credits of English at the 200 level or above, with a minimum of 15 credits at the 300 or 400 level

Creative Writing (25 credits)
Introduction/What is the Study of Creative Writing?
The Creative Writing minor focuses on writing courses: creative writing in fiction, drama, poetry, or nonfiction prose.

Why Consider a Creative Writing Minor?
Creative writing minors develop skills in creative thought and expression through study and practice of the craft of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and/or drama. Students participate in both the critical analysis and creative practice of writing, gaining widely-applicable experience in self-expression, artistic technique, and modes of communication.

Requirements:
Four creative writing courses including work in at least two genres
An elective under advisement from the 300 and 400 level courses

English Linguistics (23-25 credits)
Introduction/What is the Study of English Linguistics?
Linguistics is the scientific study of language. Students study the different components of grammar (syntax, phonology, morphology and semantics), how language changes over time, how it varies from speech community to speech community; how it is acquired by children; and how the brain is organized for language . English linguistics is the scientific study of the English language: its grammatical structure, dialects, and history. Courses in English Linguistics also address linguistic ideology and discrimination in U.S. Institutions, linguistics in K-12 education, and English as a global language.

Why Consider an English Linguistics Minor?
This minor is intended for English majors who develop an interest in Linguistics but do not have time in their schedules to double-major. Students take courses in English linguistics (the structure and history of English, etc.) as well as a selection of core courses in the Linguistics Program (syntax, phonology, etc.). Students graduate with a degree in English that also recognizes their interest and expertise in Linguistics.

Required Courses:
ENG 436 The Structure of English
ENG 438 Cultural History of English
ENG 439 Topics in Language and Linguistics (repeatable once with different topics)
Two other Linguistics courses under advisement, including offerings in other departments

Contact Information
Anne Lobeck, English Department and Linguistics Program, Anne.Lobeck@wwu.edu
Kristin Denham, English Department and Linguistics Program, Kristin.Denham@wwu.edu

Film Studies (23-25 credits)
Introduction/What is the Study of Film Studies?
In the Film Studies minor students will engage major artistic, technological, commercial, and social developments throughout cinema and media history.  They will learn a language of analysis that will equip them to communicate about and with moving images.

Why Consider a Film Studies Minor?
The study of film is one of the fastest growing disciplines at American colleges and universities.  While the Film Studies minor provides a solid foundation for further professional development in the fields of filmmaking, curating, or media publishing, it also fosters a broad base of abilities sought by employers in a variety of employment sectors.  At Western we encourage students to combine critical writing with hands-on moving image projects because we value the multimedia communication skills that are becoming increasingly important, not only in the job market, but for all informed citizens.  The film studies minor at Western also emphasizes that film is a global medium and welcomes students with interests in global studies. 

Required Courses:
ENG 312 *, 364, 464 *
Courses marked with a * may be repeated once with a different topic
Courses under advisement at the 300 and 400 level to be selected from courses in theory, film and other visual media, including offerings in other departments, such as HIST 364, FAIR 326, 361.

Women's Literature (25 credits)
Introduction/What is the Study of Women's Literature?
The study of Women's Literature includes the study of literature written by women and analysis of the representation of the wide range of issues that shape their lives and work, including but not limited to the construction of gender, sexuality, age, race and class.

Why Study Women’s Literature?
A Women’s Literature Minor provides you with essential tools for success in a wide range of careers: the ability to read critically, write clearly and specifically, and synthesize information and arguments drawn from diverse disciplines and perspectives as a means of interpreting a single text. Employers and professions of all kinds value such abilities and look for those who have them. These include publishing and editing, human management and development, education, government and the law, public relations, healthcare and technology, among others.

Requirements: Courses under advisement at the 300 and 400 level, to be selected from courses regarding women writers, topics focused on the work of women writers, and topics in the language and power of gender.

Writing Studies (25 credits)
Introduction/What is the Study of Writing Studies?
The writing studies minor is a 25 credit minor that includes courses that focus on deepening and extending your thinking and rhetorical flexibility. That is, these courses are designed to help students to develop the capacity to anticipate and appropriately respond to the particular needs of readers, and to build and examine texts, both print and digital, for widely differing contexts.

 Why Consider a Writing Studies Minor?
Writing, in all its diverse forms, is the backbone of a university education and is also critical for most professions.  Good written communication includes the ability to think deeply, reflectively, and rhetorically and develops a capacity to both foster and adapt to change. The versatility and flexibility that the Writing Studies minor offers will benefit your work in college and beyond because writing (or composing) effectively in different environments matters  regardless of the life you’re chasing after. Simply put, good writing, in whatever form it takes, can make lots happen—for you and for others.

Required Courses:
Two of the following: 301, 302, 371
One or more of the following: 401, 402, 442, 461, 462*
Courses marked with a * may be repeated once
Courses under advisement at the 300 and 400 level to be selected from courses in visual media and writing, including offerings in other departments