Winter 2019: Course Descriptions

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100-Level English Courses | 200-Level English Courses | 300-Level English Courses | 400-Level English Courses | 500-Level English Graduate Courses

 

ENG 101 – Writing Your Way Through WWU

 

Prerequisites & Notes: May not be taken concurrently with ENG 100. GUR: ACOM

A writing course designed to prepare students for college-level creative, critical, and reflective writing. Because writing looks and works differently in different contexts, this course teaches the rhetorical competencies that students need to write across multiple disciplines. The course introduces students both to the processes of building and analyzing ideas, and to ways of communicating those ideas in context-specific genres for targeted audiences. This course has the immediate goal of preparing students to succeed in their writing at Western, but it will also serve them personally and professionally. Students needing to satisfy Block A of the communications section of the General University Requirements, which ENG 101 does, are required to do so prior to completion of 45 credits. Students with a 4 or 5 AP score are encouraged to take this class so they can learn to adapt their test-taking skills to college coursework.

OVERRIDES / CAPACITY OVERRIDES ARE NEVER GRANTED FOR ENGLISH 101. English 101 is capped at 24 students due to the constraints of the physical space. Please see Course Basics for more information about ENG 101.

 

ENG 110 – Write/Remix with Western Reads

In this computer-mediated writing course, students respond to the Western Reads text by constructing and designing different kinds of print, visual, and oral texts. This course is recommended for freshmen.

11905 T 2-4 LYSA RIVERA

 

ENG 201 – Writing in Humanities

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101 or 4/5 AP English Language Exam. CCOM GUR.

Advanced instruction and practice in writing using ideas, texts and questions from a specified topic in the humanities. Areas and focus vary with section.

10941 TR 10-12 KATIE WEED

What is it that makes us want to retell, remake, and re-experience familiar stories in new ways?

In this research and writing course, we will consider the myriad ways writers have adapted tales from the page to the screen. Via in-class discussion, assigned readings, and independent research, we will interrogate questions like: how do stories that soar in one form fall flat in another? What is gained or lost when works are translated to new genres? How does culture shape what stories get told and re-told?

In consultation with the instructor, students will choose a specific work and its film adaptation(s) as the basis for independent research, culminating in a final researched essay and presentation. Other assignments for this Comm C course will include extensive informal writing in response to selected readings.

 

ENG 202 – Writing About Literature

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. BCOM GUR.

A writing course designed to help students develop the skills of close reading and careful analysis of literary texts, with particular attention to how language, style, and form contribute to a text's social or political claims. Introduces students to the challenge of situating themselves in relation to a literary text and the critical conversation about that text, and crafting multi-draft critical essays with a focused, arguable thesis supported by thoughtful sequence of claims and carefully selected textual evidence.

10065 MWF 10-11:30 BRUCE GOEBEL

In this course, you will engage in analytical reading of postmodern literature, video, music and other art forms and write personal, creative, and academic responses to those texts. We will pay particular attention to the authors’/artists’ choices in terms of form and style, exploring how form and style contribute to the viewpoint or argument of the text. For the formal writing assignments, you will produce a number of drafts, participate in peer writing workshops, and attend instructor-student conferences.

BCOM GUR Learning Objectives

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.
  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

10230 MWF 1-2:30 MARY J. METZGER

In this course we have two objectives: 1) explore the role of the literary imagination and the forms it takes in developing possibilities, especially in times and places of political and social violence and despair and 2) understand the tools and conventions critics use in their writing about literature. Consequently, we will read a range of forms—novel, poetry, and essay—and explore the relationship each text suggests between the writer’s literary imagination, their literary form, and the cultural and political history their work invites us to consider. Several essential questions will provide a touchstone for our work as readers and writers. These include: What is the relationship between the literary imagination and public life? What good can literature do in a world of social injustice, violence, and political exclusion? Does literature develop our capacity for critical thinking about the world? Our ability to empathize with and advocate for others? Does it make us better neighbors? Better judges? Better citizens? How do writers concerned with social and material history invite us to reconsider both what we know about the world and the ways in which we come to know it? Does linguistic beauty have a social role? As we take up these questions we will be explore the uses of literary and theoretical terms and concepts and the formal conventions of literary criticism in order to develop the power of our own analyses.

10688 MWF 1-2:30 TONY PRICHARD

This course looks to that place where literature and madness overlap---texts that either address characters hallucinating or texts that claim to produce madness. We will inquire into the differences between madness, weirdness and that which is yet to be articulated and made habitual. We will examine at a variety of novels, short stories and the films.

Texts:

  • Chambers, Robert. The King in Yellow (online)
  • Shadows of Carcosa: Tales of Cosmic Horror by Lovecraft, Chambers, Machen, Poe, and Other Masters of the Weird
  • Strugastsky, Arkaday & Boris. The Dead Mountaineer’s Hotel
  • Wyndham, John. Chocky

10688 TR 10-12 MICHAEL BELL

This section of English 202 involves critical inquiry into a key literary “effect”: the power of fantastic narrative to construct and inform our worldly experience, even our reality. Such stories operate in the realm of myth, and it is largely from such stories that we have learned what it is to be a human being. To sometimes great extent, we model our identities on fantastic stories, and form our expectations, assumptions, and judgments from them, drawing the arcs of narrative on which we plot the courses of our lives. The stories we read in this course will range from 19th century horror-fantasy to graphic novels to contemporary apocalypse fiction. Through intensive reading, discussion, activity, and writing we will further develop our ability to make meaning from literary texts, focusing our analyses through formal critical practices as well as rigorous play and experimentation. You will emerge from the course a stronger analytic writer and reader with greater appreciation of the power of literature to bring you to deeper self-knowledge and increased awareness of a wider, richer, more complex world.

REQUIRED TEXTS: The Seas, Samantha Hunt; Sabrina, Nick Drnaso; Dracula, Bram Stoker; Roadside Picnic, Arkady and Boris Strugatsky

ASSIGNMENTS: In addition to reading assignments and participation in class activities, requirements will comprise one formal analytical paper (including multiple drafts), a variety informal writing assignments, participation in online forums, and a final project.

10943 12-2 MARGARET FOX

In this section of English 202, we’ll focus on the themes of obedience to authority and resistance in literature. Beginning with The Handmaid’s Tale, we’ll explore both serious and satirical texts, including novels, essays, and poetry. We’ll consider the insights literature offers us and examine the ways formal critical practices help deepen understanding and appreciation of texts.

Coursework will include reading assignments, informal writing, group presentations, short papers, one formal analytical paper (with multiple drafts), and a final project. During class, we’ll have discussions and small group activities.

10944 TR 4-6 JEANNE YEASTING

This course will introduce you to ways of reading and writing that are specific to the discipline of literary study. We’ll explore, read, discuss, and write about a variety of texts that focus on representations of detectives and detecting. We’ll investigate our texts’ cultural and historical contexts, as well as their content. This is an intensive writing and reading course – you’ll be required to do a great deal of reading, writing, and talking about texts, both in and out of class, with the aim of expanding and enhancing your skills at writing about literature, while deepening your pleasure in reading and interpreting what you’ve read.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assignments include drafting, revising, and polishing writing about literature; writing reading responses;  completing detailed peer response work on drafts-in-progress; and producing a final project.

EVALUATION: Based largely on class participation, completion of assigned writings (including multiple drafts), and a final project.

TEXTS:  Students should order only the editions listed below; no e-books.

  • Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Ed. Francis O’Gorman. Broadview Press.  2006. ISBN: 978-1551117225
  • Agatha Christie. Murder on the Orient Express: A Hercule Poirot Mystery (Hercule Poirot Mysteries). William Morrow Paperbacks/HarperCollins. 2017. ISBN: 978-0062689665
  • Janet Gardner, editor. Reading and Writing about Literature, 4th edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s. 2016. ISBN: 978-1319035365

ENG 214 - Shakespeare

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a selected number of Shakespeare's plays: histories, comedies, tragedies and romances

10901 TR 2-4 MARK LESTER

In this course –– a survey of the playwright’s comedies, histories, romances and tragedies –– we will explore how our experiences enable us to interpret Shakespeare, how performance or enactment necessitates interpretation, and at the same time how the works themselves inform or influence our experience. While our focus will be on what might be called the presence of Shakespeare in the contemporary world, we will also consider the historical situation in which the plays were written and first performed. Special attention will be given to story, theme, language, and character.

Evaluation: Midterm and final exams; reading quizzes; group projects (performance); short written assignments

Text: The Norton Shakespeare (third edition, pbk.)

 

ENG 234 – African-American Literature

Prerequisites & Notes: BCGM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of written, spoken and visual texts by African-American men and women from the 18th century to the present.

13708 MWF 10-11:30 TONY PRICHARD

This course will examine African American cultural production throughout the history of the United States. There will be an examination into the tropes used by authors and how there is a contrast with those of the predominant American culture. 

Texts:

  • The Norton Anthology of African American Literature (Third Edition)

 

ENG 238 – Society/Lit: Captive Cultures

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM GUR.

A thematic approach to literature, with different themes exploring the relationship between literary forms and society. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics. May be taken only once for GUR credit.

13709 TR 12-2 KAMI WESTHOFF

This course will ask students to explore various iterations of captivity in American society through extensive examination of and interaction with a diverse collection of literature and film. Through interactive reading, writing, class discussion, group projects, and written exams, students will gain a greater awareness of the experiences of a sampling of American writers from various identities as they navigate the complexities of American society.

 

ENG 270 – Language and Society

Prerequisites & Notes: HUM GUR.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a range of texts in English and in translation by Latina/o authors.

11022 MWF 2:30-4 PAM HARDMAN

What are the essential elements to a language? How do languages change as they are used by different cultures? What are the connections between language, identity, and power? In this course we will explore these and other questions, learning about the underlying features in all languages, and how societies throughout history have shaped language.


As we address these issues, students will use their understandings to create their own languages. These new languages will include the key elements of language: pronunciation, word creation, grammar, meaning, dialect differences, taboo words, and slang.

Texts:

  • George Yule, The Study of Language 6th ed.
  • Mark Rosenfelder, The Language Construction Kit

Assignments: Unit tests; group language creation project (including regular in-class meetings and progress reports).

 

 

ENG 301 – Wrtg Stds: Open Letters Live!

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. Junior status.

Inquiry and practice of writing in personal, public and academic contexts. Emphasis on expressive, analytical, critical, and collaborative forms of writing as appropriate. Repeatable with different topics up to 10 credits including original course.

10451 MWF 8:30-10 DONNA QUALLEY

Open Letters Live!:

Dear Prospective English 301 Colleagues (or “To Whom It May Concern”):

I am writing to provide you with information about the writing studies course I am offering winter quarter 2019. “Open Letters Live” is a studio writing course in non-fiction and expository prose style that uses the genre of the open letter as a primary vehicle. The aim of this studio is to expand your rhetorical awareness and increase your stylistic flexibility. We’ll focus on those elements of writing that normally escape our attention: the individual words, the shape and placement of our sentences, the different ways we can string these words and sentences together, and the effects all these choices can have for our reading public.

To help us keep our readers in the forefront of our minds, we’ll be working with a genre that has a dual audience. Open letters are always addressed to a specific person, group, entity or even “thing,” but they are intended for circulation to wider audience. As you will discover, individuals, groups, organizations, and companies write open letters to serve a number of purposes: To share, to inform to explain, to critique, to incite, to emotionally affect. Some letters can get quite lengthy, but we will limit ourselves to shorter missives (of approximately 400-600 words).

As a genre, open letters have been around for centuries. However, the number of people writing open letters has catapulted since the advent of the internet, blogging and self-publishing. Interestingly, entire websites now devote themselves to collecting and publishing open letters. In order to understand the reasons people turn to the genre of the letter, we’ll also consider letters that were originally written to a private audience but have since moved into the public domain.

Since we will meet in a computer lab, a good part of our class time will be spent in studio or “production” mode where you will have the opportunity to try on, emulate, and experiment with an ever-accumulating repertoire of rhetorical moves gained from our reading, I’ll be moving around the studio, peering over your shoulder or sitting next to you, sometimes making an observation or offering a suggestion. What happens when you write it this way? Or that way? What difference does it make? For whom might it make a difference? How can small changes sometimes create big rhetorical effects? At the end of the course we will celebrate your good work with a “Letters Live!” performance and a digital Style Gallery of selected letters and accompanying analyses.

Looking forward to meeting you!
Donna

 

ENG 302 – Inro Tech & Professional Wrtng

Prerequisites & Notes: WP3.

Introduction to major contemporary strategies and conventions used in written and oral communication for multiple audiences in professional settings. Covers a variety of written forms used in the preparation and design of technical and business documents, critical analyses of these forms and practices, and the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

10424 TR 8-10 MICHAEL BELL

In this section of English 302 you’ll develop your skill in generating reader-centered documents that work: documents that do things as well as say things, performing specific functions for specific kinds of readers. Given that so much of our culture now communicates and conducts its business in the visual realm, your work in the course will be focused as much on document design as written language. Through this work you will gain an understanding of how all the elements of a document work together to communicate within specific contexts, for specific audiences.

English 302 is not simply a skills-acquisition course however. It’s also a course about ideas. We will use technical communication as a field in which to conduct analytic inquiry appropriate to study in the humanities. The course is organized around a sequence of projects. Each of them focus on an aspect of professional communication, but all of them will work within a guiding framework. This winter the analytic component of the course will take us into a study of games and the culture surrounding them: from board games, to collectible card games, to table-top role-playing games, to social-media games, to video games. As a student of the course, you will be teaming with other students on a series of documents, presentations, and prototypes leading to the development of an original tabletop game. The design of your game will be based in part on contemporary game studies and critiques. Every stage of this inquiry will generate documents in accord with the guidelines of effective technical and professional communication. (And yes, we will be playing games in class!)

You will emerge from the course with the ability to respond effectively to the requirements of technical communication.  You will also have a complex understanding of what is becoming a vital aspect of our contemporary culture.

10500 TR 10-12 GERI FORSBERG

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of non-academic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives for their written documents, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, instructions, a magazine article and an academic poster. Students also learn to work in small groups, collaborate on writing, and make effective oral presentations. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work.  When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

10563 TR 10-12 RACHEL SARKAR

Introduction to major contemporary strategies and conventions used in written and oral communication for multiple audiences in professional settings. Covers a variety of written forms used in the preparation and design of technical and business documents, critical analyses of these forms and practices, and the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

10627 TR 12-2 NICOLE BROWN

This interdisciplinary writing course puts knowledge into action by inventing, interpreting, translating, writing, designing, and distributing technical knowledge for audiences to easily understand and apply effectively towards doing things in the world.

In addition to rhetorical analysis and writing strategies, the course explores the influence of globalization and localization on information and media in social, economic, and ecological contexts. We will discuss how we view authorship and writing, the social construction of knowledge, and how we imagine readers as information users and as producers of discourse as social action.

A primary goal for the course is to construct a portfolio of rhetorically savvy documents for use with public audiences outside the  class: resumes, cover letters, memos, interpretive materials, instructional documents, usability testing reports, proposals, infographics, and other visual representations of information. 

Similar to most technical writing contexts, these projects require you to work individually as well as collaboratively, conduct out of class observations and research, and to practice/learn new knowledge concepts and computer applications outside regular class times. Throughout the term, you will participate in the ongoing process of digital writing that includes: planning, researching, drafting, collaborating, critiquing, revising, and presenting.

10704 TR 12-2 SIMON MCGUIRE

This section of Eng 202 uses Making Arguments About Literature: A Compact Guide and Anthology as central reference and text. To give the course an emphasis for discussion and writing, we will explore the early work of James Joyce: Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. All 3 texts are required, and other required readings and texts will be made available in class and on Canvas.

11531 TR 2-4 MARGARET FOX

In English 302, we’ll explore the main elements of technical and professional writing, or writing in action. Our underlying theme is writing that makes a difference, writing that matters. We’ll explore the meaning and significance of the phrases.

We’ll consider a wide range of rhetorical situations, focusing on the needs and interests of readers, and the purposes and contexts for documents. Course topics will include document design and strategies for sentence clarity and brevity. The class will also cover the importance of invention, research, and empathy in professional writing.

During this writing intensive course, we’ll create résumés and cover letters, and other materials. We’ll work collaboratively on an advocacy project. Final portfolios of revised projects will showcase the quarter’s work.

12714 TR 4-6 NICOLE BROWN

This interdisciplinary writing course puts knowledge into action by inventing, interpreting, translating, writing, designing, and distributing technical knowledge for audiences to easily understand and apply effectively towards doing things in the world.

In addition to rhetorical analysis and writing strategies, the course explores the influence of globalization and localization on information and media in social, economic, and ecological contexts. We will discuss how we view authorship and writing, the social construction of knowledge, and how we imagine readers as information users and as producers of discourse as social action.

A primary goal for the course is to construct a portfolio of rhetorically savvy documents for use with public audiences outside the  class: resumes, cover letters, memos, interpretive materials, instructional documents, usability testing reports, proposals, infographics, and other visual representations of information.

Similar to most technical writing contexts, these projects require you to work individually as well as collaboratively, conduct out of class observations and research, and to practice/learn new knowledge concepts and computer applications outside regular class times. Throughout the term, you will participate in the ongoing process of digital writing that includes: planning, researching, drafting, collaborating, critiquing, revising, and presenting.

 

ENG 308 – Seminar: Early Modern

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 308 if you have already taken ENG 318 or 308.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the Early Modern period. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 308 and ENG 318 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

11899 MWF 10-12 MARY J. METZGER

Shakespeare and Philosophy: In this course we will read a range of Shakespeare’s tragedies in light of philosophical questions they raise and attempt to answer, with a particular emphasis on human knowledge (epistemology) and right action (ethics). The course assumes no philosophical background but we will spend time establishing a working vocabulary and basic historical understanding of philosophical and literary forms and focus on a few major ethical theories. Throughout the course, we will explore the connection between philosophical inquiry, human complexity, and literary and, more specifically, tragic dramatic form and meaning. We will use occasional excerpts from philosophers to develop our understanding as we read and discuss Shakespeare’s work. Much writing, close reading, and critical thinking is required.

Texts: The Norton Shakespeare: Tragedies (3rd Edition) & Canvas Docs

 

ENG 309 – Seminar: The Long 18th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 309 if you have already taken ENG 319 or 309.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the long eighteenth century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 309 and ENG 319 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

11900 TR 8-10 LAURA LAFFRADO

This course focuses on the time period that scholars have recently named the long eighteenth century—that is, the era that extends from the late seventeenth century to the early nineteenth century. These are such dynamic years in the literature of what becomes the United States. We will read literary works by women and by men of various races, ethnicities, religions, and economic positions that explore vital issues of the day such as liberty, literacy, revolution, and science. We will examine the various ways in which a dominant rich male whiteness is challenged as America and American identities are formed and defined.

ASSIGNMENTS: In this course you will write both extensively and intensively, producing multiple drafts of papers, revisions, and finished essays. We will devote class time for instruction and practice in disciplinary research methods and writing strategies. Students will write short responses to the reading, shorter essays, and one twelve-page critical research paper that engages with current scholarship on an eighteenth-century text or texts assigned for class. Much reading, writing, and thinking will be asked of you, along with steady attendance, a participation grade, group work, and various out-of-class assignments

EVALUATION: 75% of your final grade in this course will be based on revised versions of writing assignments. The remaining 25% will be based on class participation and attendance.

TEXTS: Lauter, Paul (ed.), The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume A, 7th edition.

 

ENG 310 – Seminar: The Long 19th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 310 if you have already taken ENG 320 or 310.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the long nineteenth century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 310 and ENG 320 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

11901 TR 4-6 KATHERINE ANDERSON

Empire and Globalization in the Long Nineteenth Century: In the nineteenth century, Britain was the dominant superpower, claiming the “sun never set” on her vast empire because it stretched around the globe. This course investigates empire and global migration as manifested in nineteenth-century British literature and culture, focusing specifically on three geographical locations that were crucial to the British Empire: the West Indies, India, and Africa. We will consider depictions of the Empire ranging from the “uncharted” colonial territories and settler farms of South Africa to the urban spaces of London and Lahore. Along the way, we’ll incorporate attention to empire’s effects on race, class, gender and sexuality, disability, and other forms of personal identity for both the colonizers and the colonized. We’ll engage with literary and cultural representations of imperialism, such as slave narrative, imperial adventure fiction, detective fiction, autobiography, and art and visual images. We’ll also read critical sources that will provide us with a variety of theoretical frameworks to help us expand our discussion of imperialism in the nineteenth century. Some of the questions we will consider include: How did social positioning, for example class, race, or gender identity, affect experiences of empire and migration in the nineteenth century? What is the relationship of narrative to empire and expansion? How does form or genre affect a depiction of empire, or relatedly, of migration or diaspora? How did imperialism shape these various colonies, and in return, how did empire seep into the domestic space and consequently reshape Britain? How does the nineteenth-century British Empire inform our current experiences of globalization and neo-imperialism?

 

ENG 311 – Seminar: The 20-21st Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 311 if you have already taken ENG 321 or 311.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the 20-21st century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 311 and ENG 321 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

11902 TR 12-2 JEANNE YEASTING

Mystery Novels and the Rise of the Female Sleuth

In this small, discussion-oriented, writing intensive seminar, students will explore the mystery novel, and the rise the female sleuth during the 20-21st centuries. Starting with Arthur Conan Doyle's iconic consulting detective, Sherlock Holmes, we'll consider some of the many ways in which the figure of the detective/sleuth has evolved and transformed, leading to the increasing appearance and popularity of female detectives. We'll investigate the mystery novel's enduring appeal, and some of its well-known conventions, such as the brilliant but socially awkward detective with their trusty side-kick; the improbable sleuth; and a fascination with using new technologies to solve crimes. We'll delve into some of the issues that our texts raise, including crime solving as an occupation; British imperialism; WWII and its effects on labor constraints; and the dramatic alterations in gender, class, and conduct ideologies that occurred during this period.

ASSIGNMENTS: Requirements include heavy reading; leading class discussion; and a longer, final paper which you will work on writing in stages – revising, rethinking, and researching your ideas.

EVALUATION: Based primarily on active and attentive class participation and fulfillment of assignments.

REQUIRED TEXTS: Students should order only the editions listed below; no e-books.

  • Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes: The Major Stories with Contemporary Critical Essays. Edited by John Hodgson. Bedford-St. Martin’s (Macmillan Learning). 1994. ISBN: 978-0312089450
  • Agatha Christie, Murder at the Vicarage. William Morrow Paperbacks; Reprint edition. April 12, 2011. ISBN:978-0062073600
  • P.D. James, The Skull Beneath the Skin. Touchstone (Simon & Schuster). 2001. ISBN: 978-0743219563
  • Alan Bradley, As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust (Flavia de Luce Book 7). Bantam (Penguin-Random House). 2016. ISBN: 978-0345539946
  • Sujata Massey, The Widows of Malabar Hill. Soho Crime. 2018. ISBN: 978-1616957780
  • Selected texts on Canvas

 

ENG 313 – Critical Theories/Practices

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

Introduction to a range of critical and cultural theories in a historical context. Emphasis on critical reading and writing in preparation for 400-level courses in literary and cultural studies.

10093 MWF 2:30-4 MARK LESTER

Contingency: This course will focus on a series of questions concerning the nature, function, and value of literature: What exactly is a work of literature? (What is its ontological status?) How does it work? For whom does it have value? On what grounds should a work of literature be judged or assessed? Should it be conceived of strictly as an object of analysis (something to be interpreted and explained), or does the work of literature possess a distinct dynamic, critical, and constructive dimension of its own? To what kind of knowledge can authors and readers of literary works lay claim?

Using Plato as our starting point, we will follow a number of different trajectories that will allow us to explore the intersections of literature ‘proper’ and philosophy, science, and literary analysis. In this section, the critical notion of contingency will will be highlighted.

Texts:

  • V. Leitch, et. al., The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (3rd Edition)
  • G. Deleuze, Essays Critical and Clinical
  • G. Agamben, Potentialities
  • H. Melville, Bartleby & Benito Cereno
  • B. Jowett (tr.), Selected Dialogues of Plato

10232 TR 10-12 MARK LESTER

Radical Politics: This course will focus on a series of questions concerning the nature, function, and value of literature: What exactly is a work of literature? (What is its ontological status?) How does it work? For whom does it have value? On whatgrounds should a work of literature be judged or assessed? Should it be conceived of strictly as an object of analysis (something to be interpreted and explained), or does the work of literature possess a distinct dynamic, critical, and constructive dimension of its own? To what kind of knowledge can authors and readers of literary works lay claim?

Using Plato as our starting point, we will follow a number of different trajectories that will allow us to explore the intersections of literature ‘proper’ and philosophy, science, and literary analysis. In this section, emphasis will be given to twentieth and twenty-first century radically political or oppositional critical perspectives.

Texts:

  • V. Leitch, et. al., The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (3rd Edition)
  • The Invisible Committee: Now
  • B. Jasienski, I Burn Paris
  • S. Beckett, Waiting for Godot

10480 TR 2-4 JULIE DUGGER

What is literature, and what role does or should it play in society? What are the responsibilities of a literary work? To inspire individuals? To entertain? To transform society (and how)? Special attention will be given to literature’s troubling status as writing with little obligation to factual truth. We will approach these issues from three angles: by reading theoretical texts on the role of literature from the Classical period to the present, by examining literary works about storytelling and storytellers, and by evaluating the way students’ individual cultural contexts influence their beliefs about literature. Desired student outcomes include the enhanced ability to justify one’s decision to become an English major, should it ever become expedient to do so.

 

ENG 318 – Survey: Early Modern

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 318 if you have already taken ENG 308 or 318.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the Early Modern period with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 308 and ENG 318 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

11903 MWF 10-11:30 NICHOLAS MARGARITIS

Renaissance Literature: A survey of the important literary genres composed in England and the Continent during the Renaissance, including lyric poetry, narrative poetry, and drama.  Authors include Petrarch, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Ariosto.  Essay exams.

 

ENG 319 – Survey: The Long 19th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 319 if you have already taken ENG 319 or 309.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the long eighteenth century with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 309 and ENG 319 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

11904 TR 10-12 JULIE DUGGER

This course examines the mutually constitutive relationship between politics, literature, and social reform in the British eighteenth and early nineteenth century. We will read and evaluate works associated with social developments including the 1845 Jacobite Rebellion, the American and French Revolutions, the early abolitionist movement, and the development of bardic nationalism.

Questions we will ask include the following:

  • How do literary works frame and foster political identity and social movements?
  • How do social and political contexts influence literary form, as well as our understanding of which written works count as literature?
  • It’s said that history is written by the victors. To what extent is this also true of literary genres? What is the role of popular literature in popular protest, and to what extent can literature succeed in providing a voice for those who may lack one?
     

ENG 320 – Survey: The 19th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 320 if you have already taken ENG 310 or 320.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the long nineteenth century with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 310 and ENG 320 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

13736 TR 2-4 STEFANIA HEIM

“Because I could not stop for Death -/ He kindly stopped for me,” writes Emily Dickinson, coyly personifying death at the start of one of her most iconic poems. American life during the 19th century was marked by high infant mortality rates, the slaughter of native populations, the cataclysm of the Civil War, and rampant disease. Death, therefore, saturates the period’s literature—its oral and communal forms, its periodicals and popular outlets, its takes on old modes of writing, and its new genres. Through our focus on 19th-century representations of death and dying, we will encounter a wide range of literary forms. We will consider ideas about gender and grief in the sentimental novel and the intersections of private pain and public mourning in elegy and eulogy. We will investigate Native American elegiac expression. We will grapple with the intersection of social death, violent death, and communal mourning in sorrow songs and slave narratives. We will face the gruesome accuracy of war writing. And we will wonder at ghost stories and hauntings, and witness the invention of the detective story. Throughout, we will attend to the particular social and historical forces shaping these forms as well as the social, historical, and emotional work that they do.

 

ENG 333 – Global Lit: Senegal

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. TRAVEL.

Studies in world literature in English or translation and of their historical and cultural contexts.

MWF 12-1:30 CHRISTOPHER WISE

Faculty-Led Global Learning Program: Senegal. Self-sustaining tuition is $255 per credit which is not included in the 10-18 credit tuition costs. Campus dates: Jan 9-25 and Mar 3-15. Travel dates: Jan 27-Feb 13. See: WWU Global Learning Program: Winter, Senegal.

 

ENG 334 – TextsAcrossN.Am/Eur: Vancouver

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. BCGM.

Analysis primarily of North American and European texts with engagement in issues of multiculturalism and cultural diversity. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics. May be taken only once for GUR credit.

11543 MWF 8:30-10 LEE GULYAS

Vancouver: Our continent first appeared on a map around 1500. Everything west of the Atlantic was imagined and scrawled in, worthy of exploration only for either gold or the legendary Strait of Anian/Northwest Passage. In 1791, Captain George Vancouver’s four-and-a-half year expedition charted the northwestern Pacific coast and changed the course of history for Europe, the Americas, and the indigenous nations. We will be doing our own mapping by examining literary works that are fascinating by their literary merit and strategies in their own right, but also raise important questions about exploration, colonialism, indigenous nations, science, gender, ethnicity, place, work, justice, legacy, and regionalism.
 
Texts:

  • Burning Water by George Bowering
  • Discovery Passages by Garry Thomas Morse
  • Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson

 

ENG 335 – Global Texts Outside N.Am&Eur

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Analysis primarily of texts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics.

14064 TR 12-2 CATHERINE MCDONALD

Marginalized Stories: Disability Narratives the Screen and the Page: Name a book or film that includes a character with a disability, someone who is different from others around them—either physically, mentally, or emotionally. Chances are you know a story like that if you stop to think about it. Whether the disabled person is a main character and the plot revolves around their struggle or the person is a side character, the number of literary and cinematic works that represent disability abound, although they may at first not be noticed. Here’s the thing: the way those fictions portray the experience of disability is open to investigation. The real-life person whose body, mind, or emotional systems are not able-bodied rarely recognizes themselves on the screen or page. For marginalized groups outside the mainstream of a culture, and for marginalized  identities within a culture, questionable representations in fiction have a detrimental impact.

Using the critical tools of cinema and disability studies, we will interrogate literary and filmic constructions of disability, which too often portray and reproduce misinformed and troubling cultural stereotypes of “others.” Our goal is two-fold: to widen our perspective of the experience of disability, and to analyze cultural attitudes towards people with disabilities that are created and reinforced in imaginary texts.

In an increasingly globalized world, a respect for difference and an understanding of diversity are essential to being an informed member of a multicultural world. One of the purposes of this course, as a GUR that fulfills a global comparative multicultural requirement, is to help students develop a multicultural consciousness and see themselves as part of a community of others. This section of English 335 seeks to do just that. In literary and creative expressions across Asia and Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America, we’ll consider marginalized stories: disability narratives on the screen and the page.

14036 MWF 1:30-3 R 6-9 FILM SCREENINGS CHRISTOPHER WISE

Faculty-Led Global Learning Program: Senegal. Self-sustaining tuition is $255 per credit which is not included in the 10-18 credit tuition costs. Campus dates: Jan 9-25 and Mar 3-15. Travel dates: Jan 27-Feb 13. See: WWU Global Learning Program: Winter, Senegal.

 

ENG 336 – Scriptural Lit: Biblical Lit

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Analysis of literary texts in one or more religious traditions, which originated in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America; study of scriptural literature as a source of cultural paradigms.

13713 MWF 2:30-4 BRUCE BEASLEY

We will closely analyze a wide range of Biblical texts in their historic, cultural, and literary contexts, including texts from the Torah (sections of Genesis and Exodus especially) and the gospels, with additional readings in such texts as Ecclesiastes, Job, Daniel, Revelation, and apocryphal texts including the gospel of Thomas.  This is a course in literary textual analysis of the Bible as a collection of texts written over a period of nearly a thousand years in various historical and cultural contexts.  We will also explore issues of translation and the depiction of Biblical narratives in the history of painting, sculpture, poetry, and other arts. Requirements include short writing assignments each class as well as midterm and final exam.  

 

ENG 338 – Women’s Lit N Am and Europe

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Study of women's texts in various cultures primarily of North America and Europe, including thematic and stylistic development within cultural context.

10352 TR 2-4 NANCY PAGH

Women have written to express their ideas, their beliefs, their bodies, their experiences, their differences, and their places in the world, publishing literary art to make their lives and voices meaningful and acknowledged. This course will introduce students to well-known and emerging voices of women from Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century periods in the contexts of Europe and North America. 

We will consider texts through a variety of genres (essays, fiction, poetry, drama) and themes (gender and race, writing the body, sexuality, motherhood, fantasy and dream, humor and wit, the natural world, aging, and resistance and change).  Students will select much of the material that we read and study together.

In courses such as 338, where students earn five credits for attending four class hours per week, twenty percent of the course-related peer interaction is accomplished through meetings and online contact outside of the classroom. This WWU “contact requirement” will be fulfilled by posting and reading online journals and papers, sharing facilitation-related materials with a collaborative group, and meeting for not less than three hours in person with your group to plan and practice your facilitation.

“Women & Literature” is relevant and open to all students interested in connections between literature and society, identity and creative expression, and politics and aesthetics.  Although “woman” and “literature” are both unstable and evolving terms, students in this class will discover some of the powerful intersections between these fascinating and changing categories.

 

ENG 341 – Studies in Children's Lit

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 or instructor permission.

Examination of the variety and diversity of literature written for children and adolescents; exploration of book format, major genres, and works by notable authors and illustrators.

11242 TR 10-12 NANCY JOHNSON

CONTENT: In this course, we will examine the variety and diversity of literature written for children and middle grade readers, exploring how literature serves as windows, mirrors, and sliding glass doors for child readers. We will consider how form and format (picture books, graphic texts, chapter books, poetry) serve to tell a story. And, we will immerse ourselves in significant genres, topics and themes, and works by notable authors and illustrators, becoming familiar with criteria used for significant awards as we explore what makes a children’s book “good.” This course expects that you'll read voraciously, willing and eager to gain an appreciation of the world of literature (as well as the world through literature). A significant part of this course is your attendance at the WWU-sponsored Childrens/Young Adult Literature Conference on Saturday, February 23rd (required).

*** Please wait to purchase books until you come to class. ***

Texts [required]:

  • Classic text/classic theme: Charlotte's Web (E.B. White)  
  • Persistence/resilience during tough times: Refugee (A. Gratz)
  • How did that book win? (illustration): The Lion and the Mouse (J. Pinkney) and My Friend Rabbit (E. Rohmann)
  • Oh wow! I didn't know that (creative nonfiction): Strongheart: Wonder Dog of the Silver Screen (C. Fleming & E. Rohmann)

Texts [required with choice]:

  • Author/illustrator study—Barbara O'Connor: How to Steal a Dog or Wish or Wonderland
  • Plus a thematic focus (or two!) with a set of choice novels and numerous illustrated/picture books

Expectations/assignments: Commitment to think, read, and respond with appreciation, creativity and depth to literature written for children (and for the child in all of us). You'll read (and maybe re-read) both assigned and choice texts, develop the ability to write literary reviews highlighting and evaluating genre, text, and illustration, participate in response projects, and create a critical/creative project in lieu of a final exam.

 

ENG 347 – Studies in Young Adult Lit

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 or instructor permission.

Studies in literature written for and/or by young adults. May focus on literary history, genres, theme, critical approaches or specific authors. Class assignments and discussion may focus on using this literature with young adults in secondary schools and in a home setting.

10945 TR 2-4 NANCY JOHNSON

With a focus on “Identity, Agency, Community” this course invites you to become familiar with diverse genres and formats of literature, from classic to contemporary texts written for teens/young adults (age 14-20). As you read works by diverse writers, you’ll develop an appreciative eye, an eye toward expanding your aesthetic criteria, and an eye that examines critical judgments established by reviewers and award committees. Throughout the course we will consider whose voices get heard in YA literature and how those voices offer insight into teen lives and experiences. Our work will introduce (or perhaps, re-introduce) you to texts by notable YA authors in many genres, as well as their commentary about writing for young adult audiences. In lieu of a final, your culminating project will highlight character/identity through a written, visual, creative project. A significant part of this course is your attendance at the WWU-sponsored Childrens/Young Adult Literature Conference on Saturday, February 23rd (required).

Topics and texts [required]:

  • Classic YA Literature: The Outsiders (S.E. Hinton)
  • Literature of Resilience: Speak (L. H. Anderson)
  • Actions and Consequences: The 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime That Changed Their Lives (D. Slater)
  • The Price of a Perfect World: Scythe (N. Shusterman)
  • Genre Bending/Genre Blending: Mary's Monster (L. Judge)

Tentative topics and texts [required with choice]:

  • Plus a thematic focus (or two!) with a set of choice novels and an exploration of young adult award winners (Printz, YALSA Nonfiction, and Walden)

Expectations: Willingness to think, read, and respond with care, insight, and an openness to issues, formats, and themes that might challenge what you know about literature, your personal tastes as a reader, and what you remember about adolescence. Active, engaged participation is expected.

 

ENG 350 – Intro to Creative Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Examines the fundamentals of at least two genres, such as fiction, nonfiction, playwriting, or poetry. The course will include both lectures, focused on model texts, and workshop-style discussions, focused on student work.

10520 TR 2-4 SIMON MCGUIRE

This course will introduce you to elements and patterns in poetry and fiction in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will focus on writing poems and flash fiction that imitate and experiment with tools and tropes used by various poets and fiction writers over the last hundred years. We will explore poetry machines, composition techniques, and innovative constraints used by writers such as Jorge Luis Borges, James Joyce, John Ashberry, Angela Carter, Heather McHugh, Rae Armantrout, Claudia Rankine, David Foster Wallace and Margaret Atwood. The course will make use of discussion groups, short lectures and presentations, and ample time to practice, devise, develop and review responses to fiction and poetry prompts.

Texts:

  • Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft, Janet Burroway; 4th edition

13720 MWF 10-12 STEFANIA HEIM

In this course, we will explore together the activities that go into being a creative writer, among them: reading, listening, note-taking, collecting, thinking, questioning, drafting, erasing, and revising. Through in-class experiments and formal assignments we will read and write in familiar genres like poetry and fiction—identifying, working through, and honing a shared vocabulary of literary techniques—as well as in hybrid forms including lyric essays, prose poems, and epistolary texts. We will learn from interpretive and collaborative practices (including imitations and translations), visual techniques (graphics and the page as field), and performance modes. As a community of writers, we will learn how to be open-minded, sensitive, and critical readers of published work, of our classmates’ writing, and of our own experiments, especially as we explore the possibilities of substantive revision. Thoughtful and energetic participation, attentiveness and curiosity, a willingness to take risks, and careful reading will be the primary requirements throughout the quarter.

Texts:

  • Family Resemblance: An Anthology and Exploration of 8 Hybrid Literary Genres, Ed. Marcela Sulak and Jacqueline Kolosov. Rose Metal Press, 2015.

14031 MWF 3-4:20 KRISTIANA KAHAKAUWILA

Faculty-Led Global Learning Program: Senegal. Self-sustaining tuition is $255 per credit which is not included in the 10-18 credit tuition costs. Campus dates: Jan 9-25 and Mar 3-15. Travel dates: Jan 27-Feb 13. See: WWU Global Learning Program: Winter, Senegal.

 

ENG 351 – Intro to Fiction Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Examines the fundamental tools available to writers of fiction: point of view, dialog, characterization and voice. The course introduces the terms and protocol of workshop critique.

10004 MWF 10-11:30 KELLY MAGEE

In this introductory course, you will practice the art of writing short fiction. Using prompts and published work as guides, we’ll look at how to move outside “what you know” into the larger territory of “what you didn’t know you knew.” We’ll use stories driven by inquiry (as opposed to formula) as our guides: questions about a character, a search for meaning. We’ll look at techniques such as how to write scenes, maximize tension, create an authentic voice, develop characters, choose a form, and cultivate insight. The bulk of the class will be driven by workshops of student work. You’ll write a great deal of practice exercises and strive for several polished stories as well.

Equally important to this class is reading fiction. Loving to read is a prerequisite for any creative writing class. Your best teachers are your favorite stories, and serious writers read constantly and widely. Beyond the act of writing itself, one of the most sure-fire ways to develop your writing is to learn how to analyze narratives, so a large part of the class will be held in discussion groups and workshops. You’ll be evaluated on two criteria: the original stories you write for class (the art) and your ability to read and constructively comment on the work of others (the analysis). You’ll learn the language of writers, which is all about seeking to understand and articulate the particulars of the strange beast that is creative writing.

10644 TR 2-4 KAMI WESTHOFF

This course is designed to introduce you to the craft and culture of writing fiction as well as the complex world of critique and workshop. We will read established authors from various backgrounds and cultures and study the ways in which they make their writing work through unique use of voice, description, language, dialogue, character development, and experimentation. While reading and studying these authors, you will begin your own journey into fiction writing with the help of various writing exercises and assignments, revision, and most importantly, your imagination and individuality.

 

ENG 353 – Introduction to Poetry Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. 

Introduction to the techniques of poetry writing, including craft, practice and modeling.

10094 TR 10-12 JANE WONG

Language is curious. Language is an archeological dig, a translucent fish. In this class, we will turn over the rock and see what’s underneath. We’ll discover that language is malleable, evocative, elusive, and ferocious. In addition to language, we will test our curiosity with genre, form, and content. We will read and write poetry. And then we will question these genres. Be prepared to challenge yourself aesthetically, thematically, and formally. Throughout the quarter, we will return to certain questions: How can we use language to convey the unconveyable? How can words on a page move us? How can we play with language and form in an innovative, challenging, and productive way? English 353 is a foundational-level course that introduces writers to the history, craft, and practice of poetry writing. To help us explore the above questions, we will read the work of diverse writers, including the work of your peers. By interrogating and exploring these texts as readers, we will get a better sense of how language and structure work (or don’t work) and how we can begin to cultivate our own styles and literary voices. You will be expected to generate creative pieces for workshop, feedback letters, and a final portfolio of revised work. Additionally, we will invite visiting guest poets to our class this quarter, moving writing from the page and into the real world!

 

ENG 354 – Intro to Creative Nonfict Writ

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

An introductory course in writing nonfiction prose, such as personal essay, memoir, autobiography, travel writing, and other forms.

10497 MWF 11:30-1 BRENDA MILLER

In this course, you will learn how to translate personal experience and research into effective pieces of creative nonfiction. We will strive to define the term “creative nonfiction” by reading work across a broad spectrum of content and form, and you will learn how to read these pieces both as a scholar and as writer. We will also delve into the ethical considerations that come into play when your writing is situated in real life. Be prepared to write extensively both inside and outside of class, and to share your work with others.

Texts:

  • Tell it Slant: Writing and Shaping Creative Nonfiction (Trade Edition), Miller and Paola
  • Brevity, an online literary journal: http://www.creativenonfiction.org/brevity/
  • Course pack of assorted readings to be printed out (required)

10645 TR 12-2 NANCY PAGH

Students in this section of English 354 will explore a range of forms and themes in the literary genre of creative nonfiction. Through theorizing the ethics of "truth" telling, close critical analysis of example texts, and rigorous immersion in the process of drafting, revising, and polishing personal essays, participants will come to better understand and express their language, themselves, and their world.

Assignments: Weekly reading and writing assignments; daily journal assignments; weekly 5th-hour peer group meetings; a portfolio of finely honed revisions and including a critical assessment of one's learning in the course.

Required Text: Miller & Paola, Tell It Slant

 

ENG 364 – Introduction to Film Studies

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Overview of the conventions and techniques of narrative cinema with some readings in film theory.

10425 TR 12-2 M FILM SCREENS GREG YOUMANS

The course introduces the foundations of film studies. We will explore core vocabulary, concepts, and skills that help us look and listen more closely to motion pictures. We will also develop practices of critical thinking, argumentation, and analysis through various writing exercises. Our course screenings will present films from around the world and from the historical beginnings of cinema to the present day. Finally, a video-production project will further enrich everyone’s understanding of how movies are put together.

 

ENG 365 – Film Hist: Contemporary World Cinema

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 364 or ENG 202.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of films belonging to a particular period in film history. Repeatable with different topics up to ten credits including original course.

11907 TR 2-7 FILM SCREEN T 4-6 EREN ODABASI

Contemporary World Cinema: This course explores several evolving and flexible notions including national cinemas, transnational media production, digital filmmaking, blockbuster culture, film festivals, spectatorship and fandom in the context of contemporary world cinema.

While it carries the debatable term “world cinema” in its title, this course does not solely focus on “foreign” or “international” cinemas. We will study directors from new centers of exciting cinematic activity (such as Southeast Asia and Latin America), English-speaking territories including the US, and continental Europe alike. Throughout our discussions, we will see many different channels through which these regional borders are challenged; including but not limited to financial or institutional mechanisms, production practices, and cinematic kinship among directors from various backgrounds.

Within the scope of this course, the word “contemporary” functions as a tool to keep our endeavor focused and manageable rather than referring to a particular time period. One of the main objectives of this course is to provide students a balanced mix of established and emerging directors, highlighting the connections between their works and building bridges across generations.

Selected Films

  1. Graduation, dir. Cristian Mungiu, 2016
  2. Ixcanul, dir. Jayro Bustamante, 2015
  3. Tabu, dir. Miguel Gomes, 2012
  4. The Great Beauty, dir. Paolo Sorrentino, 2013
  5. A Touch of Sin, dir. Jia Zhang Ke, 2013
  6. Felicite, dir. Alain Gomis, 2017
  7. Happy New Year, dir. Farah Khan, 2014
  8. Your Name, dir. Makoto Shinkai, 2016

 

Books

Most of the readings will be on Canvas. There are two additional required books:

  • World Cinema: A Critical Introduction by Shekhar Deshpande and Meta Mazaj. Routledge, 2018.
  • Cinema Today: A Conversation with 39 Filmmakers from Around the World by Elena Oumano, Rutgers University Press, 2010.

 

ENG 370 – Introduction to Language

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Overview of language structure and use. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, how language is acquired, and how it changes over space and time. Emphasis on English as a global language.

10095 MWF 8:3010 PAM HARDMAN

This course will introduce students to the key principles of linguistics and the cultural use of language. We will start by examining the fundamentals of semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. We will then explore issues of regional, racial and gender differences, dialect variation, language acquisition, and historical change. We’ll look at language as a complex, messy, ever-changing part of human experience.

Evaluation/assignments: Mid-term and final exams; written projects; exercise sets.

Texts: Ohio State University, Language Files 12

10353 TR 2-4 CATHERINE MCDONALD

This course is an introduction to the wonder and nature of language. Course content includes a survey of approaches used to probe, wonder about, and understand language, including the branches of linguistics called phonology, morphology, syntax, and stylistics. Questions about gender and language, cultural prejudices about accents and dialects, and speculative ideas about the role of language in shaping thinking and identity—all of these are topics in English 370. We’ll see that while many aspects of language are rule-governed phenomena that can be studied with mathematical precision, others are as loose and ephemeral as our sense of ourselves and our understanding of experience. No wonder, then, that philosophers and computer-scientists, mathematicians and poets, all find a common subject in language.

Course work will include regular homework exercises, project/tests, and outside readings. Lively participation is required as part of the course.

Text:  

  • How English Works: A Linguistic Introduction 3nd Ed. by Anne Curzan and Michael Adams.

 

ENG 371: Rhetorical Analysis

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. Junior status.

Introduction to rhetorical theories and analysis.

13716 MWF 11:30-1 DONNA QUALLEY

“Here’s an idea.” That’s how Mike Rugnetta, writer and host of the popular YouTube “Idea Channel” begins each episode. Rugnetta’s aim for his program was simple: “apply philosophical and critical concepts to things in the popular culture canon and then have a discussion about them.” Airing more than 350 episodes over its five-year run, Rungetta titled almost all of his episodes with a question. In this course, we’re going to create our own Idea Channel by beginning with some questions about a big idea: What is R-H-E-T-O-R-I-C? What does it do? Why might some people say that everything is rhetorical?”

One of the oldest definitions of rhetoric comes from Aristotle: Rhetoric is discovering or inventing, in any given case, the available means of persuasion. Aristotle was big on words. But in a world where words and facts and evidence and “good reasons” no longer seem sufficient to compel us to listen, to think, or to do differently, how can we discover and invent the available means of persuasion? What makes communication informative, compelling, and moving, and why does it sometimes not do what we intend it to do?

In the first part of the course, we’ll dig into this big idea of rhetoric, coming at it from different historical and contemporary perspectives. We’ll look at rhetorical practices and how information gets communicated on the Idea Channel and other popular YouTube channels. In the latter part of the course, working alone or with others, you’ll create our own “Here’s a (Rhetorical) Idea” video. You’ll attempt to employ the rhetorical practices that your idea or concept represents and, hopefully garner commentary and discussion among viewers!

 

ENG 401 – Wrtg & Rhet: Hidden Discoveries

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 301 or ENG 302 or ENG 370 or ENG 371.

Senior writing seminar on the theories and practices of rhetorical genres.

11697 MWF CATHERINE MCDONALD

Vizzini [for the 4th time]: “Inexplicable!”
Inigo Montoya: “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.”

When someone asks me what I study and teach, I wonder how to translate the definition of rhetoric (let alone the entire field of writing studies) into something they’ll understand. So I use one of my “elevator speeches”: “How we make meaning with words” (1 minute version) or “Rhetoric: not only a dimension of all discourse, but the condition of our existence—a way of being, knowing, organizing, and acting in the world” (2 minute version, cobbled from many sources). It depends upon how many floors we’re traveling.

For this section of Eng 401, we will spend our time doing some detective work reading the meaning embedded in rhetoric. I’m particularly interested in the situation and ideology that arouse communicative meaning-making in the first place, so I’m calling our study

“Rhetoric as a Portal into What People Believe When They Speak and Write in the World ”

The technical term for this investigation might be called discourse analysis. As one scholar says: “Discourse analysis is the study of language-in-use. Better put, it is the study of language at use in the world, not just to say things, but to do things” (Gee). In the world of The Princess Bride, we’ll explicate why the Man in Black was inconceivable to Vizzini.

Together as a class, we’ll do a lot of reading, discussing, thinking, writing, rethinking, rewriting, and collaborating. You’ll apply the theories we’re studying to real interests you have in the world.

 

ENG 402 – Adv Tech & Professional Wrtng

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 302.

Writing-intensive class focusing on advanced problems of technical communications and their solutions. Strategies for identifying target readers and meeting their informational needs. Special emphasis on a technical writer's responsibilities and the ethical, social and technical issues surrounding electronic publishing.

10778 TR 4-6 JEREMY CUSHMAN

In this course you’ll team up with other students to help solve problems and build documents for specific clients in our community. Our clients will be non-profit organizations here on campus and within the greater Bellingham community. You’ll be building documents that go to work in the world. So a large part of this course will consist of practicing how to best discern and respond to the needs of specific clients. The work we do will help you expand your competency for writing in context, project management, document design, teamwork, research, and using technology. I’ve outlined these competencies in more detail below.

Writing in Context

  • Analyze the invention, manufacturing, and distribution of technologies in context and use writing to communicate these attributes in a variety of media and genres.
  • Write to the different levels of technical expertise of a range of audiences and stakeholders to foster understanding.
  • Understand the ethical implications of working within the nexus of technology and culture.

Project Management

  • Understand, develop and deploy various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents both individually and collaboratively.
  • Select and use appropriate technologies that effectively and ethically address professional situations and audiences.
  • Build professional ethos through documentation and accountability.

Document Design

  • Understanding and adapting to conventions and expectations of a range of audiences including both technical and non-technical audiences.
  • Understanding and implementing design principles of format and layout.
  • Interpreting and arguing with design.
  • Drafting, researching, testing, revising, visual design and information architecture.
  • Ensuring the technical accuracy of visual content.

Teamwork

  • Working online and face-to-face with colleagues to determine roles and responsibilities.
  • Managing team conflicts constructively.
  • Responding constructively to peers' work.
  • Soliciting and using peer feedback effectively.

Research (Doesn't always mean the library or internet)

  • Working ethically with research participants, subject matter experts, and technical experts.
  • Locating, evaluating, and using print and online information selectively for particular audiences and purposes.
  • Triangulating sources of evidence.
  • Selecting appropriate primary research methods such as interviews, observations, focus groups, and surveys to collect data.
  • Applying concepts of usability research, such as user-centered design.

Technology

  • Use and evaluate the writing technologies frequently used in the workplace, such as emailing, instant messaging, image editing, video editing, presentation design and delivery, Web browsing, content management, and desktop publishing technologies.

 

ENG 408 – Cultural Studies: Scribes & Griots

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371.

An advanced course that applies semiotic and/or textual approaches to a wide range of cultural issues. Repeatable once with different topics.

14035 MWF 12:00-1:30 CHRISTOPHER WISE

Faculty-Led Global Learning Program: Senegal. Self-sustaining tuition is $255 per credit which is not included in the 10-18 credit tuition costs. Campus dates: Jan 9-25 and Mar 3-15. Travel dates: Jan 27-Feb 13. See: WWU Global Learning Program: Winter, Senegal.

 

ENG 415 – National Lit: American Poetry

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371.

An advanced course that applies semiotic and/or textual approaches to a wide range of cultural issues. Repeatable once with different topics.

13721 TR 2-4 NING YU

This course helps students develop a working history of an important literary genre, nature writing, which evolves into what now people call environmental literature. We start with the Chinese poetry in Tang Dynasty (618-907) and trace its influence on three Japanese Hiku masters (Basho, 1644-1694; Busan, 1716-1783; Issa, 1763-1827). Then we travel over oceans to study the way the English gentleman Gilbert (1720-1793) White observes closely the environment of his hometown Selborne. White’s influence can be clearly seen in the works of Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) who allegedly founded the “Thoreavian tradition” in environmental literature. In the twentieth century, women played an important role in environmental studies and made their voices heard clearly. We will read Terry Tempest Williams’ Refuge and Linda Hogan’s Dwellings.

 

ENG 418 – Senior Seminar. Opens to Juniors on November 15.

Prerequisites & Notes: Senior Status; ENG 313 and one from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, or ENG 311. Important note: ENG 418 is not repeatable & cannot be used as an elective for the literature major.

An advanced seminar offering an in-depth exploration of specialized topics. Requires students to develop scholarly projects integrating course material with their own literary, historical, and theoretical interests. This course is not repeatable.

10567 TR 12-2 KATHERINE ANDERSON

Post-9/11 Literature: Everything changed after the planes hit the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001. We now live in a “post-9/11” world, defined by our obsessions with security, warfare, terrorism, ethnicity, and national identity. Certainly, 9/11 is the defining event of the 21st century (at least to date) for the United States, but what about the rest of the world, Western and otherwise?

In this class, we’ll examine the literary response to the events of September 11th, 2001 and their aftermath. Throughout, we’ll consider the developing, distinctive identity of a body of twenty-first-century writing (often called "Post-9/11 literature") that is transnational as well as American. In addition to offering an introduction to critical terrorism studies, the concept of terrorism, and the production of knowledge about political violence, the course will interrogate the influence contemporary writers have on the ways we shape our cultural narratives about 9/11, terrorism, warfare, security, ethnicity, religion, politics, globalization, and national identity, and conversely, the way cultural narratives about those things influence contemporary writers. Our discussions will be framed by our attention to both the writers’ aesthetic choices and their cultural/political claims.

  • Ben Fountain, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk
  • Mohsin Hamid, Exit West
  • Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist
  • Tabish Khair, How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position
  • Ian McEwan, Saturday
  • Kamila Shamsie, Burnt Shadows

10566 MWF 10-11:30 JULIE DUGGER

The Serial: With hits such as the podcast Serial and new digital modes of publication such as Netflix, Patreon, and Serial Box, we appear to be in a boom period for serial literature: stories released in installments over time. This class will consider serial literature old and new, with examples ranging from the 19th to the 21st centuries. We’ll use narrative and genre theory, cultural criticism, and reader response approaches to ask questions including the following:

  • How is narrative structure affected by interruption?
  • How do greater opportunities to build and interact with an audience affect serial content?
  • How are serials shaped by publishing industry factors including technology, distribution, pricing, and available markets?
  • What happens when real-life events overlap with the plot of a serial publication?

 

ENG 423 – Major Authors

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371; possible additional prerequisites relevant to topic.

Studies in the texts of a writer or writers in English or in translation. Repeatable once as an elective with different authors.

10906 TR 10-12 LAURA LAFFRADO

Ella Rhoads Higginson: This course looks at the writings of once celebrated but now long forgotten author Ella Rhoads Higginson, the first prominent literary writer from the Pacific Northwest and the first Poet Laureate of Washington State. Higginson was celebrated for her award-winning fiction, her lyric poetry which was set to music and performed internationally, and her prolific nonfiction. During the turn from the nineteenth century into the twentieth century, readers across the nation were introduced to the then-remote Pacific Northwest region by Higginson’s descriptions of majestic mountains, vast forests, and scenic waters, as well as the often difficult economic circumstances of those dwelling near Puget Sound. We will read her major works in the order she wrote them, pay attention to their interactions with the larger culture, watch her create characters who help define the Pacific Northwest, and ask why Higginson became so famous. We will consider issues of gender, race, region, and identity, among others.

10426 MWF 2:30-4 CHRISTOPHER LOAR

Henry and Sarah Fielding: In this course, we’ll be focusing closely on the writings of a pair of literary siblings. Henry Fielding has long been considered a giant in the history of fiction. His comic novels, full of bawdy jokes, harsh satire, and larger-than-life characters, transformed and redefined this genre. His early dramatic writings and his later political essays are also startlingly fresh and modern in feel even today. Fielding's sister, Sarah, on the other hand, was long neglected by literary scholars and readers alike, but in her own day she was widely-known as one of the most influential writers of satiric and sentimental fiction, and her writing retains its power to provoke emotion and pleasure. In this course, we will read fiction, essays, and drama by this prodigious sibling pair; in the process, we'll explore a range of questions, among them these: how did these writers respond to new developments in popular and print cultures in the mid-eighteenth century? How did Henry Fielding adapt earlier literary forms to conform to his vision of a benevolent and sensual personhood? How did Sarah Fielding establish herself as a writer and a public figure in a time when this was difficult for women? Why were fiction and drama in the eighteenth century so controversial, and how did these controversies shape the trajectories of these two literary careers?

Tentative reading list:

  • Henry Fielding: Tom Jones and/or Amelia; The Author's Farce; The Tragedy of Tragedies; several shorter works
  • Sarah Fielding: The History of Ophelia; The Governess; several shorter works

Assignments/evaluation: The course will require your regular presence and active engagement in the classroom. You'll also write one shorter and one longer essay, as well as in-class work and a number of short, low-stakes writing assignments.

 

ENG 436 – The Structure of English

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 370 or instructor permission.

Introduction to English sentence structure. Topics include clause structure, modification, complementation, and syntactic principles such as movement, coordinating and pronominalization.

13783 MWF 2-2:30 ANNE LOBECK

This course provides you with the basic tools to analyze sentence structure, in order to better understand how structure affects meaning in oral and written language. We take as a starting point our own internalized system of linguistic rules, which allow us to produce and understand language. Through the study of our own linguistic system we will discover the organizing principles of grammar: how words are organized into categories (or “parts of speech”); how words form syntactic units, or phrases; how these phrases function together in larger units or clauses. Along the way, you will acquire a precise and useful vocabulary to talk about sentence structure, as well as a useful set of tools you can use to analyze language in its many forms. 

Who should take this course? Anyone with an interest in learning more about how language works! The course is particularly useful for education majors and practicing teachers, providing them not only with tools of sentence analysis but ways to practically apply this knowledge in the writing classroom.

In addition to learning about sentence structure we will also explore the study of grammar in a larger context.

Topics may include:

  • How should grammar be taught in school (should it?) 
  • How do social attitudes about grammar influence policy decisions?
  • How does grammatical structure influence writing style?
  • Where did the notion of “standard” English come from, and what is it?
  • Where did the notions of “correct” and “incorrect” grammar come from?
  • How has the structure of English changed over time?
  • How does the structure of English vary (in different dialects)?
  • How is knowledge of grammar tested and assessed (in the SAT, AP language and literature assessments, etc.)?
  • Do new technologies affect grammar? If so, how (in texts, tweets and on Facebook)?

Evaluation: regular homework exercises (graded S/U) 15%, 2 exams 60%, and a project (education option: in class practicum) 25%.

Required Text: Navigating English Grammar: a guide to analyzing real language, Anne Lobeck and Kristin Denham. Wiley-Blackwell (available as pdfs on Blackboard);

Additional Materials: Teaching Grammar Through Inquiry: a teacher’s guide; lesson plans and activities developed with Sehome High School English/Journalism teacher (and WWU graduate) Dana Smith.

13800 TR 1202 KRISTIN DENHAM

This class provides an overview of the fundamentals of English syntax. You will become familiar with the basic syntactic organization of English, including syntactic categories (parts of speech), heads and phrases, subordination, coordination, modification, and complementation. The approach to grammatical structure will be descriptive; we will explore and describe (using current linguistic terminology) our intuitive knowledge of language. The (scientific) approach to grammar, and to syntax more specifically, will be different from the more familiar “school” approach, in which you learn grammar and usage rules in order to speak and write “correctly.” Rather, what you learn in this course will provide you with important tools of critical analysis to make your own informed decisions about grammar and usage. Along with our study of the structure of English, we will explore public perceptions of grammar (what constitutes a grammatical “error:” attitudes about “good” and “bad” language; notions of “standard” versus “non- standard” English, and more). This course, then, will not only introduce you to the fundamentals of English sentence structure, but will also provide you with an important context for the study of grammar, its influence on other areas of modern thought, and the study of language more generally.

REQUIRED TEXT: Navigating English Grammar: Analyzing the Syntax of Real Language, by Anne Lobeck and Kristin Denham.

 

ENG 443 – Tch Eng Lang Arts in Sec Sch I. Major restrictions do not lift.

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 301 or ENG 302; ENG 347; ENG 350; ENG 370; and two from ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, and ENG 311. Major restrictions are never lifted.

Survey of theory, practice, resources and methods of assessment for the teaching of English language arts.

10099 MWF 10-11:30 PAM HARDMAN

This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence that is designed to help you become a thoughtful, knowledgeable, and effective teacher of English language arts at the secondary level. In this first quarter, we emphasize the teaching of writing, though oral performance, literature, and media will be integrally linked. Through the frames of pedagogical theories, we will connect what we know about the diverse student population that secondary teachers face with what we know about ourselves as language arts learners and teachers in order to create useable teaching materials. This is a writing and reading intensive course. This methods course requires the same kind of individual initiative, dedication, and professionalism that you will apply to your future work as a teacher.

Evaluations/assignments: Unit Assignments; Lesson Plan and Performance; Sequenced Writing Activities Project

Texts:

  • Crovitz and Devereaux, Grammar to Get Things Done
  • Kelly Gallagher, Write Like This
  • Liz Prather, Project-Based Writing
  • Tom Romano, Fearless Writing

 

ENG 444 – Tch Eng Lang Arts in Sec Sch II

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 443.

Continuation of the survey of theory, practice, resources and methods of assessment for the teaching of English language arts. This course may include a two-week, one period a day teaching practicum in a middle or high school.

10907 MWF 8:30-10 BRUCE GOEBEL

This course is the second of a two-quarter sequence that is designed to help you become a thoughtful, knowledgeable, and effective teacher of English language arts at the secondary level. While ENG 443 focused primarily on the teaching of composition, this second course focuses on the teaching of skills related to reading, interpretation, and the critical analysis of literature and other media. In addition, this course will also attend to the specifics of lesson and unit planning for the English language arts classroom. Through the frames of a variety of pedagogical theories, you will connect what you know about the diverse student population that secondary teachers face with what you know about yourselves as language arts learners and teachers in order to discover what methods might work best for you and your future students.

This methods course requires the same kind of individual initiative, dedication, and professionalism that you will apply to your future work as a teacher, so please show me your best.

 

ENG 451 – Creative Wrtng Seminar: Fiction

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 351.

An advanced course in the writing of fiction. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 cr.

10151 MWF 2:304 KELLY MAGEE

This course will focus on genre-bending short stories, such as those that incorporate elements of genres such as sci-fi, fantasy, speculative, horror, and romance, those like flash fiction that blur the line between poetry and prose, and those like YA that speak to different audiences. As a writer and teacher, I am particularly interested in how fiction can engage with the living world, including through activism and social justice, and to this end one of the questions we’ll be considering in both the published and student-produced texts we read is, What motivates characters in fiction? What motivates you to write? What motivates people to act the ways they do? How can you use motivation to find depth in your characters? How can you use it to create empathy for challenging characters?

We’ll spend the quarter moving through a series of experimental exercises designed to get you thinking and writing in new ways, and we’ll move back and forth between composing, workshopping, and revising. We’ll discuss advanced methods of creating voice and crafting narrative, including writing with urgency and breathlessness, using defamiliarization to find the extraordinary in the ordinary, and using restrictions (word count, sentence style, time limits) to tap into new creative pathways. The course will culminate in a 10-15 page portfolio, modeled on the types of submissions writers often do after graduation.

10779 TR 8-10 ELIZABETH COLEN

In this advanced workshop in fiction writing, students will closely read and analyze books of short stories published in the last 12 months, engage in weekly writing exercises and imitations, and hone their storytelling skills through the production of several fully revised stories. The final project will be a portfolio that includes 10-15 pages of fully revised, well-crafted work.

 

ENG 453 – Creative Wrtng Seminar: Poetry

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 353.

An advanced course providing disciplined expression in a variety of modes of writing poetry. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 cr.

10488 TR 10-12 ELY SHIPLEY

This seminar focuses on the practice of reading and writing poetry. We will spend the quarter reading, writing, and discussing poems and poetics essays through focusing on elements such as metaphor, image, rhythm, sound, line, and dramatic tension. You will share original work and offer thoughtful observations to each work discussed. The texts for this course explore poetic traditions and contemporary developments. Likewise, they span diverse embodiments of sexual, racial, national, class-based, and familial experiences. Examining the artistic attributes of these texts, we will seek to understand form’s relationship to content and how poems work to generate experience. Through deep analysis of varied and excellent models, we will amass resources and practice techniques to make our own poems and poetics statements. Poets whose works are under consideration for this course include Kazim Ali, Aaron Apps, Anne Carson, Jos Charles, CA Conrad, Terrence Hayes, Bhanu Kapil, Layli Long Soldier, Shane McCrae, Mark Nowak, M. NourbeSe Philip, Claudia Rankine, Solmaz Sharif, and Jillian Weise, among others. We become better writers through reading, thinking and feeling intensely, learning from our own work, the work of others, and above all, by practicing.

 

ENG 454 – Creative Wrtg Sem: Nonfiction

Prerequisites & Notes: 354. 

An advanced workshop course in the writing of nonfiction, building on skills learned in prior courses. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 cr.

10459 MWF 10-11:30 BRENDA MILLER

Much of the power of creative nonfiction lies in the strength and character of the writer's voice. Finding and developing that voice, however, is not as easy as it sounds. In this course, we will do intensive study of the sub-genre called “Flash Nonfiction” so that we can hear many diverse voices as they express themselves in compressed forms. We will study many examples of individual pieces, but we’ll also aim toward creating an accumulation of short essays that add up to a larger story. We’ll also listen to oral storytellers to learn how an author can establish a strong voice and tell a compelling story in a short amount of time.

  • Flash Nonfiction: Advice and Essential Exercies from Respected Writers, Editors, and Teachers, Ed. Dinty Moore
  • Safekeeping: Some True Stories From a Life, Abigail Thomas
  • Handouts posted on Canvas
  • The Moth, podcasts

 

ENG 457 – Poetry Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: 353.

Intensive study of poetic texts in traditional and experimental forms. Opportunity to compose in a variety of poetic forms. Study of appropriate models. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 credits, including original course.

10648 MWF 1-2:30 BRUCE BEASLEY

“The dream thinks like a poet,” wrote dream theorist Bert States.  In this seminar we will examine the history of interpretations of the structure of dreams in relationship to the structures of poetry. Reading in dream theory, we will explore links between poetic structures of metaphor, metonymy, formal and rhythmic patterning, repetition, condensation, displacement, in relation to analogous structures that prevail in the work of dreaming. We will read widely in poetry that moves in nonlinear, associative, surreal ways akin to the meaning-making work of the dream. Each student will keep an annotated dream journal during the quarter, and will write original poems investigating links between the work of poetry and the work of dream. The structures of our dreams will present new possibilities for the structures of our poems.

 

ENG 459 – Editing and Publishing

Prerequisites & Notes: 351, 353, 354.

Intensive reading, writing and workshop in one or more specific modes of nonfiction, such as memoir, travel writing, autobiography and the personal essay. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 credits, including original course.

10946 TR 4-6 CHRISTOPHER PATTON

This course will be, first, a deep history of editing and publishing—shaping thought and language to make them public. We’ll look at oral traditions ancient and modern; the invention and spread of writing; a plethora of media, from clay tablets and papyrus scrolls to illuminated quires, mass-market paperbacks, artists’ books, and e-books; and modes of production and dissemination as varied as woodblock printing, movable type, leaflets dropped from planes in wartime, and of course the rapidly evolving internet. To situate themselves in this history, students will choose among several intensive projects: online publishing (blogs and websites); submission of creative work to literary journals; chapbook design; learning to copyedit at a professional level; maybe others we think up together. Students will learn how their work as writers and readers belongs to an edgeless worldwide conversation, and will acquire skills to aid their entry to the publishing world as authors or editors.

 

ENG 460 – Multi-Genre Wrtg

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 351, 353,  or 354.

Intensive study of topics in creative writing that cross genre boundaries, or that critique those boundaries. Opportunities to compose experimental or hybrid works. Repeatable with different instructors to a maximum of 10 credits.

12211 TR 12-2 ELY SHIPLEY

Hybrid Forms: Building on poet Robert Creeley’s statement, “form is never more than an extension of content,” we will explore the recent trend in contemporary poetry toward hybrid forms. While hybrid texts are nothing new, many contemporary poets are crossing genres to a degree that suggests an erasure of such categories altogether. This trend leads to questions such as: what are the subjects, circumstances, and desires that drive expansions of poetic form? What poetic techniques, whether meter and rhyme or appropriation and erasure, are used? What are their effects? Might we read such moves as fundamental to contemporary identity? Carole Maso asks, “Does form imply a value system? Is it a statement about perception?” The texts for this course span diverse embodiments of sexual, racial, national, class-based, and familial experience as they necessarily trouble traditional genres. Examining the artistic attributes of these texts, we will seek to understand how literature might be made. Through deep analysis of varied and excellent models, we will amass resources and practice techniques to produce creative work. Authors whose works are under consideration for this course include Kazim Ali, Aaron Apps, Eula Biss, Jenny Boully, Anne Carson, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, CA Conrad, Lily Hoang, Bhanu Kapil, Wayne Kostenbaum, Lucas de Lima, Shane McCrae, Maggie Nelson, Mark Nowak, Diana Khoi Nguyen, M. NourbeSe Philip, Kristin Prevallet, Claudia Rankine, Juliana Spahr, and CD Wright, among others.

14032 MWF 3-4:20 KRISTIANA KAHAKAUWILA

Faculty-Led Global Learning Program: Senegal. Self-sustaining tuition is $255 per credit which is not included in the 10-18 credit tuition costs. Campus dates: Jan 9-25 and Mar 3-15. Travel dates: Jan 27-Feb 13. See: WWU Global Learning Program: Winter, Senegal.

 

ENG 466 – Screenwriting

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 364 or one course from ENG 350, ENG 351, ENG 353, or ENG 354; or equivalent experience and instructor approval.

This course in film studies and creative writing provides students an introduction to screenwriting. The course focuses on the writing of narrative screenplays, both short and feature length, while also introducing skills applicable to other genres, including the video essay, episodic narrative for the web, and experimental forms.

13722 TR 2-4 FILM SCREENING T 4-7 GREG YOUMANS

The course is an introduction to screenwriting with an emphasis on the art of storytelling. We will focus on the writing of narrative screenplays, both short and feature length. To guide our efforts, we will explore and analyze a range of examples, both as screenplays and as final films, ranging from art cinema to offbeat indies to mainstream Hollywood movies. The term will culminate in substantial work toward an independent project.

 

Graduate (MFA or MA) Courses

ENG 502 – Seminar in Writing of Fiction

12575 TR 6-8 CAROL GUESS

Truth, Trauma, and Transformation: This is an experimental workshop in short form fiction conceived as a response to individual and collective trauma and resilience triggered by current events in the United States. We will answer pressing questions in fiction, using imagination to write beyond the limits of this historical moment, building fictional characters and worlds focused on lying, truth-telling, witness, and memory. Our primary texts for discussion will be online journals and magazines. Requirements include two polished short stories and numerous brief writing assignments. Additional texts TBA.

 

ENG 504 – Seminar in Writing of Poetry

13723 TR 2-4 JANE WONG

As Audre Lorde writes: “Poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action.” This seminar will explore the role of poetry as deeply engaging, resisting, and changing our current society. Who are we as poets in today’s world? How can we wrestle with the complexities and intersections of our personal and collective lives through language? With rigorous attention to the relationship between form and content, we will write poems in dialogue with prominent contemporary poets. As an active poetry community, we will revisit the stakes of poetry via seminar discussions, constructive feedback, and radical revision strategies. Alongside books by guest visitor(s), poets we will engage with include: H..D., Gwendolyn Brooks, Danez Smith, Ross Gay, Layli Long Soldier, Solmaz Sharif, Chen Chen, CA Conrad, Cathy Park Hong, Javier Zamora, and many more.

 

ENG 509 – Internship in Writing, Editing, and Production

10103 TBD STAFF

 

ENG 510 – Rhetoric: New Publics

10377 TR 2-4 JEREMY CUSHMAN

This course wrestles with two competing assumptions: 1. The public is a social sphere constructed through historically shifting interactions among people. And 2. the public is made up of social interaction, yes. But it also is comprised by the built environment––the objects and spaces and processes through which we interact. There is a lot (a lot!) of ‘middle’ between these two poles and we’ll do our best to ask our questions from there.

We'll start wrestling with these assumptions by first finding some relatively stable footholds within rhetorical theory and practice, particularly the theories and practice that emerge from a relationship between ancient rhetoric (e.g. "Big Daddy A and Greco-Roman Way") and what increasingly goes by the name New Materialism. New Materialism has its roots in feminists methodologies (generally operating in the sciences). It's a name for work that emphasizes the self-organizing powers of nonhuman processes, that explores the dissonant relations between those processes and cultural practices, and, maybe most importantly, that rethinks the sources of ethics. New Materialism has, for many, upended what it means to study and to practice rhetoric. It has to some degree altered our historical, classical "origin" stories in exciting and pretty uncomfortable ways. So that's where will start.

Once we all feel some stability within the relationship between classic rhetoric and New Materialist rhetoric in terms of what "counts" as a public, we'll slow way down and take that relationship with as we read D. Diane Davis's Inessential Solidarity. In her book, Davis makes a compelling, if difficult, case for an ethical obligation to respond to the other that is as undeniable as the obligation to age. Such an obligation generates new possibilities for publics and for public rhetoric because it pushes past symbolic theories of persuasion toward more fundamental (and undeniable!) notions of affectability and resposivity.

Believe or not, we'll still have some time to then explore fairly contemporary practices for public rhetorics. While we are exploring these practices together, you'll be completing your own public engagement project. You'll start the project about half way through the quarter and the project might consist of, say, a designed social media campaign, a guerrilla poetry project, a set of small essays for a platform like Medium.com, a podcast project, a longer research essay for an academic public, and so on. What you decide to make will depend on what theories and practices get a hold of you as you think through the publics in which in you act.

Texts:

  • Jane Bennett's Vibrant Matter
  • D. Diane Davis's Inessential Solidarity
  • Provided Articles, Videos, and Audio Projects

 

ENG 550 – Amer Lits: Nature Writing and Ecocriticism

12576 TR 12-2 NING YU

From the “Howling Wilderness” to “Life in the Woods”: a Critical Review of the American Perceptions of Nature.

This course helps students develop a working history of an important American genre of literary perceptions and presentations of nature. We’ll start with a glimpse of the Native American world picture and then review the Puritan, Romantic and what Larry Buell calls the realism of environmental literature.

 

ENG 575 –Women's Literature: Chicana Feminism

12577 TR 8-10 LYSA RIVERA

Chicana Feminisms: This graduate seminar examines Chicana literary history and feminist discourse since the Chicano Movement (1960s-70s). Briefly, Chicana feminist discourse (also known Xicanisma) encompasses the political, theoretical, and cultural work of women and trans women who self-identify as Chicana, a term usually reserved for politically engaged women of Mexican descent living in the United States. Working more or less chronologically, we will work together to understand and appreciate the how material, lived, and political conditions and political concerns have animated Xicanisma and shaped its literary expressions. Our reading list is robust and includes literary texts across multiple genres and several book-length works of Chicana feminist theory and history. Assignment requirements will include weekly response papers, individual presentations, an annotated syllabus assignment, and one 15-20-page research paper. 

 

ENG 580 – FILM: Cinema & Immigration

10631 TR 10-12 FILM SCREENINGS W 5-8 EREN ODABASI

Cinema and Immigration: This course explores various ways through which the production, circulation, and consumption of cinematic texts intersect with the notions of immigration, diaspora, and exile. We will focus on several historical, social, and economic contexts including: 

  • The wave of German-speaking filmmakers who worked in the United States during and after the Nazi regime, 
  • The cinematic representations of the Jewish experience in Latin America, 
  • The role popular Hindi-language films play in shaping the Indian diaspora and the relationship diaspora audiences maintain with their homelands,
  • The legacy of colonialism on both contemporary European films and the cinematic output of African countries formerly colonized by European nations,
  • The recent roster of films depicting the ongoing European refugee crisis as it continues to unfold.

What are the common thematic and stylistic elements that characterize cinematic portrayals of immigration across such a wide range of contexts? What are the key concepts, debates and points of contention in the theorization of cinema’s relationship with the immigrant experience as formulated by prominent film scholars? In seeking answers to these questions (and other similar ones), we will see several films, read canonical texts, and work towards a mid-length research article throughout the quarter.

Selected Films:

  • The Time That Remains, dir. Elia Suleiman, 2009
  • The Earrings of Madame De…, dir. Max Ophuls, 1953
  • The Other Side of Hope, dir. Aki Kaurismaki, 2017
  • Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1973
  • Head On, dir. Fatih Akin, 2004
  • Black Girl, dir. Ousmane Sembene, 1966
  • Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge, dir. Aditya Chopra, 1995
  • Fire at Sea, dir. Gianfranco Rosi, 2016
  • The Lost Embrace, dir. Daniel Burman, 2004

Readings:
Most of the readings will be available on Canvas, but there is one required book:

  • An Accented Cinema: Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking by Hamid Naficy, Princeton University Press, 2001.