Winter 2022 Course Descriptions

Table of Contents

100-Level English Courses

200-Level English Courses

300-Level English Courses

400-Level English Courses

Graduate English Courses

100-Level English Courses

ENG 100 Intro to College Writing

CRN: 13876 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: Lucchesi, Andrew

This course provides an intensive workshop in college-level writing skills. We will use writing as a tool for understanding complex ideas, for making new knowledge, and generally for getting stuff done at college.

We will focus our attention on the interconnections between writing and emotion. As one aspect of our intelligence, our emotions provide important insights for any writing task. We will examine this, but also where emotional concepts and beliefs can interrupt the writing process. In the second half of the course, we will conduct digital research projects describing novel connections between emotion and writing.

ENG 101 Writing Your Way Through WWU

Prerequisites Notes: May not be taken concurrently with ENG 100. GUR: ACOM.

A writing course designed to prepare students for college-level creative, critical, and reflective writing. Because writing looks and works differently in different contexts, this course teaches the rhetorical competencies that students need to write across multiple disciplines. The course introduces students both to the processes of building and analyzing ideas, and to ways of communicating those ideas in context-specific genres for targeted audiences. This course has the immediate goal of preparing students to succeed in their writing at Western, but it will also serve them personally and professionally. Students needing to satisfy Block A of the communications section of the General University Requirements, which ENG 101 does, are required to do so prior to completion of 45 credits. Students with a 4 or 5 AP score are encouraged to take this class so they can learn to adapt their test-taking skills to college coursework.

OVERRIDES / CAPACITY OVERRIDES ARE NEVER GRANTED FOR ENGLISH 101.

200-Level English Courses

ENG 201 Writing in Humanities

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. CCOM.

CRN: 10765 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: McDonald, Catherine

Disability in Children's and Young Adult Literature

English 201 is a composition course that offers advanced instruction and practice in writing using ideas, texts, and questions from a specified topic in the humanities. This section of 201 will examine the social significance, cultural power, and personal influence of children’s books and young adult literature as the underlying topic of our research and writing class in our course of study in the humanities. In particular, we’ll look at how disability is portrayed to children.

No matter how high your level in college or how diverse your major, chances are there was a book in your childhood that you still remember reading (and perhaps wouldn’t mind reading again). Which children’s book would you say is the absolute best? Which one influenced you in some memorable way? How many kids’ books have been made into movies that you’ve seen? What do you think of Frozen? Wonder? Finding Nemo?

Although we usually fail to notice it (a problem itself that deserves interrogation), children’s stories abound with characters with a physical, intellectual, or emotional limitation—someone other than “the norm” of standard beauty or body function. If you Google “disability in young adult literature” you will find hundreds of links to books you may have read but never noticed the subtext of negative representation of people with disabilities.

Children’s literature does more than provide childish entertainment, although that is a valid purpose and property of such texts; it educates, informs, shapes, and inspires. Not for children alone, children’s literature presents a rich field to research and write about in our course of study in the humanities.

ENG 202 Writing About Literature

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. BCOM.

CRN: 10062 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: Anderson, Katherine

Emily Dickinson once wrote, “Art – is a house that tries to be haunted.” But what does it mean to be haunted? This section of ENG 202 will consider the formal and thematic hauntings present in a variety of literary genres. We’ll think critically about what constitutes a “haunting,” and how all literature, in its formal elements such as character and setting, is haunted by its ancestors. The texts for the course each engage with the topic in different ways and in different forms, including short stories, films, and, of course, novels. The hauntings in question may relate to individuals, to families, or to the nation. They may be “literal,” referring to spirits or specters (or monsters), or they may describe a figurative psychological state. Through our inquiry we will examine the hauntings that drive both our culture and our fictions, as well as the accompanying fear, grief and guilt, because, as Jack Kerouac put it, “if you're not haunted by something … you're not interested or even involved.”

In addition to introducing you to the college-level study of literature, this course will help you cultivate reading and writing skills that can be applied to various critical situations. In our discussions of both literature and composition, we’ll focus on the relationship between form and function: the ways in which what is said connects to how it’s communicated (and why this matters). You will learn terms and structures for analyzing language, narrative, and form. This is a writing course, and we will be writing often and at length. Assignments will include weekly work in class and/or on Canvas, a comparative essay (4-5 pages), and a research essay (6-7 pages).

Student Learning Objectives (what you will get from your work in this class):

By the end of the quarter, students should be able to:

  1. Identify basic generic and formal characteristics in literature.
  2. Perform critical analysis of literary works across genres.
  3. Effectively express interpretations through writing.
  4. Demonstrate a working knowledge of analytical writing, including the construction of a scholarly argument.
  5. Demonstrate stronger rhetorical skills – an understanding of audience and situation – by considering their use in widely different kinds of texts.

Warning: This course incorporates mature themes. Some of the texts we’ll read may include representations of graphic violence and/or sexuality. Please be certain you are able to discuss this kind of material in a mature, respectful way.

CRN: 10207 Day/Time: MWF 01:00-02:20 Instructor: Colen, Elizabeth

In this course we will read, respond to, and analyze a wide range of texts. Students will exercise and refine textual and cultural analysis skills by examining how an author utilizes context, form, language, and elements of style. Assignments include close readings of texts, active engagement in class discussion, and one critical essay, with strong focus on developing and refining a thesis, organization of an essay, and revision through multiple drafts.

CRN: 14331 Day/Time: MWF 01:00-02:20 pm Instructor: Wise, Christopher

In this course, we will analyze and interpret various literary genres, including poetry, plays, films, as well as literary fiction and nonfiction, with the goal of preparing students for advanced work in literary study, especially writing college-level essays in literary criticism. In addition to studying prominent works of literature, student papers will sometimes be workshopped in class. Attendance for this face-to-face class is mandatory. Writers studied will include Shakespeare, William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Joy Harjo, and others.

CRN: 10566 Day/Time: MWF 02:30-03:50 Instructor: Amendt-Raduege, Amy

Good stories give us a lot to talk about.  But while we spend a lot of time talking, we seldom think about the wonderful gift of being able to write about these forms of literature, when in fact writing about literature is fundamental to what English majors do.  This class will provide you with the skills you need to excel:  identifying topics for analysis, developing ideas, revising drafts, performing research, and even enjoying the whole process.  As an added bonus, you’ll get to read some great literature, too.

CRN: 10766 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Bell, Michael

This section of English 202 involves critical inquiry into the literary effect of “speculative fiction,” which for our purposes we can define as the literatures of the imagination: fantasy, science-fiction, horror, alternative history. Such fiction has become arguably the dominant mode of contemporary narrative production, so there is rich opportunity to explore the power these literatures have had on history and culture. The specific forms we will study will of course include the written word, but because so much of our contemporary culture is expressed and reflected in the visual realm, we will go beyond the page to include film, TV, comics, and game narratives in our inquiries.

All of our study will assume that whatever form it takes, fictional narrative has the power to construct and inform our worldly experience, even our reality. To sometimes great extent, we model our identities on literary stories, and build our perspectives from them. By making connection to our experiences and histories, stories illuminate the world, permitting us to see more texture and variety and possibility in our lives. Through intensive reading, discussion, activity, and writing we will further develop our ability to make meaning from the texts we study, focusing our analyses through formal critical practices as well as rigorous play and experimentation. You will emerge from the course a stronger analytic writer and reader with greater appreciation of the power of literature to bring you to deeper self-knowledge and increased awareness of a wider, richer, more complex world.

CRN: 10767 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: McGuire, Simon

This section of Eng 202 uses Making Arguments About Literature: A Compact Guide and Anthology as central reference and text. To give the course an emphasis for discussion and writing, we will explore the early work of James Joyce: Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. All 3 texts are required, and other required readings and texts will be made available in class and on Canvas.

CRN: 10768 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Dietrich, Dawn

This writing course will invite you to think about your identity(ies) as a writer and to become more aware of the social, political, and rhetorical contexts of “writing” about literature. In this specific section of English 202, we will focus on contemporary forms of critical expression (multi-modal blogs, podcasts, video essays, comix) as well as study a contemporary graphic novel, My Favorite Thing is Monsters, by Emil Ferris. I’m excited to introduce you to the radical work of the indie comix scene with this recent work by Emil Ferris!  We will explore the intersectional young adult themes of identity, community, and agency. Through this graphic novel, we will try to articulate and understand the strange, the beautiful, the complex, and the interesting . . . . My Favorite Thing is Monsters features marginalized and under-represented characters and themes, including topics such as love and friendship (relationship building), depression, sexuality, resiliency, loneliness/isolation, and mental and physical abuse. We will celebrate this comix as a queer space where openness, fluidity, and non-conformity represent textual strategies as well as characters’ identities. The themes in Ferris’ work intersect and overlap with politics and rebellion while issues of diversity and inclusion are brought to the fore in a contemporary context. We will also study comix form, technique, and theory, and you will have the opportunity to write or produce media about My Favorite Thing is Monsters as well as create your own comix in the course. No artistic experience or illustrating talent is required for this assignment or this class! I also invite you to share your favorite comix or web comix throughout the quarter.

*Please note: this class content contains adult language and themes.

Assignments and Evaluation

You will have the opportunity to write multi-modal blogs, create a podcast or video essay, or produce your own comic about My Favorite Thing is Monsters. You will also have the chance to engage in comix workshops, where you can play and learn about your own artwork. Everyone will receive full credit for doing the comix exercises, which are totally fun! No artistic experience or illustrating talent is required.
 
Required Texts

  • Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud (PDF in Canvas or you can order a print book)
  • My Favorite Thing is Monsters (vol. 1), Emil Ferris (print book or digital text)
  • Free Comic Book Day’s (FCBD) Our Favorite Thing is My Favorite Thing is Monsters, Emil Ferris (free online)

ENG 203 Wrtg for Public Prof Audiences

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101.

CRN: 13891 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Bell, Michael

English 203 is designed to provide you with instruction and practice in the creation of highly effective documents custom-tailored to specific professional and public audiences and their functional contexts. Writing in this field is focused on the uses that readers put to texts, readers who are reading to make decisions, choose actions, or accomplish tasks. Audience-centered writers are therefore experts in rendering complex information in clear terms that their readers can understand. A skilled professional writer is able to accurately determine the specific requirements of a target audience, making careful selection and presentation of information for specific effect. Such writers present complex information with impeccable organization and clarity across many different kinds of documents: letters, reviews, reports, proposals, and presentations among them.

Successful audience-centered writers must be excellent researchers and fast-learners. Increasingly, such writers must also be excellent visual designers, with a solid grasp of the effects of graphics and layout on reader response. In the 21st century, the production of text for professional and public audiences lies within the realm of design: writers for these audiences are document designers.

Assignments will comprise both solo and group projects, for a variety of audiences/contexts.

ENG 214 Shakespeare

Notes & Prerequisites: HUM.

CRN: 13892 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: Lester, Mark

In this course we will explore how our experiences enable us to interpret Shakespeare, how performance or enactment necessitates interpretation, and at the same time how the works themselves have informed or influenced our experience. While our focus will be on what might be called the presence of Shakespeare in the contemporary world, we will also consider the historical situation in which the plays were written and performed. Special attention will be given to story, theme, language, and character.

Evaluation: Midterm and final exams; reading quizzes; film/performance review, participation.

Texts:

  • The Arden Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet (ISBN 9781903436912)
  • The Arden Shakespeare: Richard III (ISBN: 9781903436899)
  • The Arden Shakespeare: Hamlet (ISBN: 9781472518385)
  • The Arden Shakespeare: King Lear (ISBN: 9781903436592)
  • The Arden Shakespeare: The Tempest (ISBN 9781408133477)

ENG 227 Queer Literature

Notes & Prerequisites: BCGM.

CRN: 12893 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Shipley, Ely  

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a range of texts by queer authors.

ENG 234 African-American Literature

Notes & Prerequisites: BCGM.

CRN: 12289 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Lee, Jean

It’s quite astonishing that there are records of African American writing from before the Revolutionary War (1775-1783), especially as many colonies instituted laws forbidding enslaved people from learning or teaching to read or write. Given that their literacy was a source of, as well as impediment, to their resistance, the oral tradition has been central to African American culture. In this course, we will explore how African Americans have been speaking back to their conditions of oppression, especially by bringing together the oral and the written, to create their own transcendent literary traditions. We will explore oral genres such as speeches, spirituals, and podcasts. We will also analyze how writers bring the dynamism of speech into literary expression through pamphlets, essays, poetry, and novels. Throughout the quarter, we will also query how African American writers strategically conform to and deconstruct normative ideals that are often exclusionary, and how they approach religion as a site of contestation and self-discovery.

ENG 238 Society/Lit:

Notes & Prerequisites: HUM.

CRN: 13113 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Beasley, Bruce

In this course we’ll examine spoken word, performance poetry, and slam poetry in relation to the societal issues they confront, such as issues of racial, sexual, and gender identity; racial oppression and poverty and police brutality; sexual assault and abuse; body shame; constructions of gender; heterosexism and transphobia; economic and power inequality, and much else. Spoken word poems address urgently the most pressing social and historical and personal issues, and we’ll discuss both the issues and the poems and performances that emerge from engagement with them.  We’ll explore the history of slam poetry and examine video and audio recordings of contemporary performance poets such as Buddy Wakefield, Anis Mojgani, Andrea Gibson, Saul Williams, Patricia Smith, Tracie Morris, Beau Sia, and many others. We’ll examine the conjunctions of poetry, performance, and video. The course will consider the role of poetry in American culture and the role of community and the spoken word in the history of poetry worldwide. We’ll interact with slam and spoken word both critically through analysis and discussion and, as an option, through writing, performing, competing, and videotaping original individual and group performances.

300-Level English Courses

ENG 301 Wrtg& Public

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101; junior status; or instructor permission. WP3. Major restrictions will be lifted on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 4:30pm.

CRN: 10372 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Lucchesi, Andrew

Comics

Who doesn’t like to read comic books? Comics, and graphic narrative art more generally, offer unique possibilities for multimodal communication through their combination of written words and images. 

This course explores the rhetorical and artistic possibilities of comics and other graphic narrative forms. One thing this means is reading a lot of comics, both ones that have been anthologized as canonical and those that are coming out today. We will see how these texts make meaning, how they are constructed through digital and material media, and how they circulate through cultures and identities. Comics are public writing, whether we’re talking webcomics, cartoon strips, or graphic memoirs: they speak to highly specific public communities and draw their rhetorical power from decades (or even centuries) of cultural tradition and media evolution. 

This is a course for comics scholars and comics artists alike. There is no level of artistic skill required to be in the class, but you do have to be willing to try. Most classes will involve some drawing, some discussion, and some hands-on activities. You will have the chance to develop your skills in two primary areas, scholarship and creation. For comics scholars, you will study comics history, interview members of fan communities, and dive deep into analyzing comics of your choosing. For comics creators, you will explore your own comics literacy, experiment with “audio comics,” and create an original comic of your own. You will create your own path through this work, choosing from the scholarly and creative to fashion your own original portfolio.  

There are two required books for this class:  

  • Scott McCloud’s “Understanding Comics” (new $24, used $7) 
  • Lynda Barry’s “Making Comics” (new $20) 

In addition, you will also be purchasing several things from The Comics Shop on Holly Street:  

  • Around nine single-issue comics of your choice from The Comics Place ($3-4 per issue, 8-9 issues, $24-36 total) 
  • One “Trade Paperback,” or short-run collection of comics ($10-20) 

ENG 302 Technical Writing

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101; junior status. WP3. Major restrictions will be lifted on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 4:30pm.

CRN: 10355 Day/Time: TR 08:00-09:50 Instructor: Sarkar, Rachel 

Students engage with the rhetorical and technical practices for creating user-friendly content. Topics include document design, information architecture, and sentence-level efficacy. The course covers a variety of technical genres and focuses on the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

CRN: 10412 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Forsberg, Geri

Online. Synchronous.

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level workshop course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of nonacademic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, a formal report, an infographic, and a visual presentation. Students also learn to work in small breakout groups, collaborate on writing, and give peer feedback. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work. When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

CRN: 10464 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Sarkar, Rachel

Students engage with the rhetorical and technical practices for creating user-friendly content. Topics include document design, information architecture, and sentence-level efficacy. The course covers a variety of technical genres and focuses on the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

CRN: 10516 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Forsberg, Geri

Online. Synchronous.

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level workshop course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of nonacademic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, a formal report, an infographic, and a visual presentation. Students also learn to work in small breakout groups, collaborate on writing, and give peer feedback. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work. When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

CRN: 10578 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Lewis, Justin

In ENG 302, we will be learning about and practicing technical communication through the study of rhetorical principles, audience analysis and user experience design (UXD). We will be learning about rhetorical problem-solving principles and applying them to diverse professional writing tasks and situations. In other words, in this class, you will be learning about the conventions for writing, speaking and designing appropriate workplace documents and communications. We will be studying and writing a variety of different genres that are common in professional settings and you will be learning about and testing out new digital platforms and programs for technical & professional communication.

Assignments/Evaluation:

  • Rhetorical Analysis
  • Professionalization Documents
  • Website Design

CRN: 11266 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Lewis, Justin

In ENG 302, we will be learning about and practicing technical communication through the study of rhetorical principles, audience analysis and user experience design (UXD). We will be learning about rhetorical problem-solving principles and applying them to diverse professional writing tasks and situations. In other words, in this class, you will be learning about the conventions for writing, speaking and designing appropriate workplace documents and communications. We will be studying and writing a variety of different genres that are common in professional settings and you will be learning about and testing out new digital platforms and programs for technical & professional communication.

Assignments/Evaluation:

  • Rhetorical Analysis
  • Professionalization Documents
  • Website Design

ENG 307 Seminar: Medieval

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 307 if you have taken ENG 307 or ENG 317. Creative writers without an endorsement will be able to register after 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 12589 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Instructor: Amendt-Raduege, Amy

Knights! Dragons! Churches! Really good gravy! The literature of the Middle Ages is diverse and fascinating, ranging from the silly to the sublime, the enlightening to the enigmatic, the humorous to the holy. Far from being stiff and boring, medieval literature is filled with adventure, excitement, and the ongoing quest to understand the human condition. The songs, stories, and tales of this period of history continue to exert their influence today, in works like The Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, and even Game of Thrones - and it all begins with English 307.

Text: The Broadview Anthology of Medieval Literature.

ENG 308 Seminar: Early Modern

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 308 if you have taken ENG 308 or ENG 318. Creative writers without an endorsement will be able to register after 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 11532 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Laffrado, Laura  

Using texts from the late fifteenth century through the early eighteenth century, this course focuses on writings of exploration, conquest, and European imperialism in colonial contact zones. We will draw on a wide range of genres including journals, poems, narratives, sermons, and diaries. We will consider how these various genres challenge our definition(s) of "American" literature(s) and we will examine roles of female discourse, race, religion, and class. We will explore the various ways in which America and American identities are defined, wonder about the tensions between sociopolitical position and discourse, and attempt to arrive at a deeper understanding of influences that shaped American writings during the encounter era.

ASSIGNMENTS: In this course you will write both extensively and intensively, producing multiple drafts of papers, revisions, and finished essays. We will devote class time for instruction and practice in disciplinary research methods and writing strategies. Students will write short responses to the reading, shorter essays, and one ten-twelve page critical research paper that engages with current scholarship on an early modern text or texts assigned for class. Much reading, writing, and thinking will be asked of you, along with steady attendance, a participation grade, group work, and various out-of-class assignments
 
EVALUATION:  75% of your final grade in this course will be based on revised versions of writing assignments. The remaining 25% will be based on class participation and attendance.

TEXTS:  Lauter, Paul (ed.), The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume A, 7th edition.

ENG 309 Seminar: The Long 18th Century

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 310 if you have taken ENG 309 or ENG 319. Creative writers without an endorsement will be able to register after 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 11533 Day/Time: TR 08:00-09:50 Instructor: Laffrado, Laura

This courses focuses on the time period that scholars have recently named the long eighteenth century—that is, the era that extends from the late seventeenth century to the early nineteenth century. These are such dynamic years in the literature of what becomes the United States. We will read literary works by people of various races, ethnicities, religions, and economic positions that explore vital issues of the day such as liberty, literacy, revolution, and science. We will examine the various ways in which a dominant rich male whiteness is challenged as America and American identities are formed and defined.

ASSIGNMENTS: In this course you will write both extensively and intensively, producing multiple drafts of papers, revisions, and finished essays. We will devote class time for instruction and practice in disciplinary research methods and writing strategies. Students will write short responses to the reading, shorter essays, and one twelve-page critical research paper that engages with current scholarship on an eighteenth-century text or texts assigned for class. Much reading, writing, and thinking will be asked of you, along with steady attendance, a participation grade, group work, and various out-of-class assignments

EVALUATION:  75% of your final grade in this course will be based on revised versions of writing assignments. The remaining 25% will be based on class participation and attendance.

TEXTS:  Lauter, Paul (ed.), The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume A, 7th edition.

ENG 310 Seminar: The Long 19th Century

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 310 if you have taken ENG 310 or ENG 320. Creative writers without an endorsement will be able to register after 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 11534 Day/Time: MWF 02:30-03:50 Instructor: Hardman, Pam

Resisting Narratives

CONTENT: In this course we’ll explore a variety of texts created by women in North America during the long 19th century. Each of the texts challenges traditional narratives, resisting not only genre expectations but also broader cultural assumptions and structures. Many of the texts give agency and voice to marginalized women, providing – to borrow bell hooks’ words – ways to subversively claim space that normally excludes them. We’ll consider different types of media in addition to writing, such as scrapbooks, embroidery, samplers, recipes, and quilts.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assigned reading; discussion presentation; short writing responses; final multi-media project.

TEXTS: may include the writers Sui Sin Far, Zitkala-Ša, Harriet Jacobs, Louisa May Alcott, Rose Terry Cooke, Fanny Fern, Pauline Hopkins, and Emily Dickinson, as well as examples of scrapbooks, samplers, embroidery, recipes, and quilting.

ENG 311 Seminar: The 20-21st Century

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 311 if you have taken ENG 311 or ENG 321. Creative writers without an endorsement will be able to register after 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 11535 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Heim, Stefania F. 

“We need elegies,” concludes poet Countee Cullen at the end of his 1925 poem “Threnody for a Brown Girl.” In this course, we will ask: what can literature possibly offer us in the experience of grieving our beloved dead? How might stanzas or musical language negotiate the intersection of private and public trauma, relating individuals to the world in moments of the most intense feeling? What kind of poetry can speak to structural violence and mass killings in racist, sexist, and xenophobic states? What relationships can we imagine between mourning, literature, and politics? Derived from the Greek for “mournful song,” the traditional “European elegy” is understood to move through three stages of loss: from lament, to praise, to consolation. Together, we will consider the legacies of this form, its developments across the 20th century, and any potential it might have for our present. We will study elegies that confront intimate loss as well the most devastating aspects of the past century: lynchings, the Holocaust, perpetual war and industrialized armed conflict, the police murders of Black people, the AIDS epidemic, and the COVID-19 pandemic. We will root our investigations in various theoretical approaches, close reading poems that, in Jahan Ramazani’s words, “erupt with all the violence and irresolution, all the guilt and ambivalence of modern mourning.” In this student-centered, writing-intensive seminar, interactive discussions and various creative and scaffolded writing assignments will provide multiple ways in to this challenging and moving material.

ENG 313 Critical Theories: Prac I

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10085 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Dugger, Julie

What is literature, and what role does or should it play in society? What are the responsibilities of a literary work? To inspire? To entertain? To transform its world (and how)? We’ll approach these issues from three angles: by reading theoretical texts from the pre-Socratic writers to the 19th century that discuss the purpose of art and literature, by examining literary depictions of storytelling and storytellers, and by evaluating the way students’ individual cultural contexts influence their beliefs about literature. Desired student outcomes include the enhanced ability to justify one’s decision to become an English major, should it ever become expedient to do so.

ENG 314 Critical Theories Prac II

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 13117 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: Prichard, Tony

An exploration of theory and criticism from the 19th, 20th, and 21st Centuries.

  • The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism Third Edition

CRN: 13118 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Prichard, Tony 

An exploration of theory and criticism from the 19th, 20th, and 21st Centuries.

  • The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism Third Edition

ENG 318 Survey: Early Modern

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 318 if you have taken ENG 308 or ENG 318. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 13120 Day/Time: MWF 01:00-02:20 Instructor: Lester, Mark

The Forest and the Trees

This course is a survey of 16th and 17th century fiction, poetry and drama focusing on the cultural significance of early modern representations of nature in general, and of the forest in particular. In Shakespeare’s As You Like It, the forest is contrasted to the court and is said to have a great deal to teach us. The majority of the action of Loves’ Labours’ Lost takes place in the park surrounding the royal court. The manner in which such representations have shaped our relationship to the woods, our sense of our place in the world, will also be explored.

TEXTS:

  • Norton Anthology of English Literature: vol b – 16th Century/Early 17th Century; Shakespeare: Love’s Labours’ Lost (Arden Shakespeare Edition). Additional materials will be distributed in class or posted on Canvas.

ENG 320 Survey: The Long 19th C.

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 320 if you have taken ENG 310 or ENG 320. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 12298 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Giffen, Allison

Antiquated spaces, castles, patriarchal estates, ghost ships and garrets, these are some of the settings of the American gothic literature, a literature which harbors America’s hidden secrets, its repressed emotions, desires, and anxieties. In this course we will examine the ways in which gothic literature represents the cultural contradictions between American optimism, with its investment in a coherent national identity, and some of America’s darker realities. Race and slavery are specters that insistently haunt U.S. gothic literature, and we will pay close attention to the relationship between fictive gothic effects and the very real horrors of New World slavery. We will also attend to the development of a female gothic in American literature, exploring the interesting tensions between the perpetuation and consolidation of oppressive social structures and the text’s drive toward subversion. My goal is to offer you a survey of U.S. nineteenth-century literature, focused through the lens of the gothic. Writers under consideration will include Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, and Louisa May Alcott and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Requirements will include lively and engaged participation in classroom discussion, a variety of formal and informal short writing assignments, and an essay-style midterm and final exam.

ENG 321 Survey: The 20-21st Centuries

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 321 if you have taken ENG 311 or ENG 321. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 13900 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Lester, Mark

Refusing Happiness

Confronting the devastation of the Second World War as well as the new reality of a nuclear age and escalating Cold War, the Western powers of the mid-twentieth century went to considerable lengths to assure their uneasy, more or less traumatized if not entirely dispirited populations that the hardships they had endured and sacrifices they had made had been both meaningful and worthwhile –– that the cultural institutions and liberal humanist values
associated with the West could and would continue to be a source of hope and inspiration.

In this course, we will examine works by a number of authors writing in English and French during the period 1939-1969 that are marked by skepticism with respect to the celebration of Western values or that repudiate the humanist conception of the self. What is surprising is that these works are not (or are not always) cynical. Though dismissive of promises of personal fulfillment grounded in the tenets of consumerism, political assurances of greater individual freedom (offered by either the left or the right), or the promotion of an indomitable, incontestable faith in scientific and technical salvation, each presents at least the prospect of thinking, of being otherwise. The texts are (for the most part) not without humor.

Texts:

  • Gertrude Stein, Ida (Yale University Press, ISBN 978-0300169760);
  • Samuel Beckett, Watt (Grove Press, ISBN 978-0802144485);
  • Boris Vian, Mood Indigo (Farrar, Straus, Giroux, ISBN 978-0374534226);
  • George Perec, A Void (Verba Mundi (ISBN, 978-1567922967);
  • Ann Quin, Passages (And Other Stories, ISBN 978-1911508939).

Additional material may be made available on Canvas or will be distributed in class.

ENG 334 Txts/N.Am&Eur

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent.

CRN: 11274 Day/Time: MWF 01:00-02:20 Instructor: Gulyas, Lee

Vancouver

Our continent first appeared on a map around 1500. Everything west of the Atlantic was imagined and scrawled in, worthy of exploration only for either gold or the legendary Strait of Anian/Northwest Passage. In 1791, Captain George Vancouver’s four-and-a-half-year expedition charted the northwestern Pacific coast and changed the course of history for Europe, the Americas, and the Indigenous nations. We will be doing our own mapping by examining recent works that are fascinating by their literary merit and strategies in their own right, but also raise important questions about exploration, colonialism, science, gender, ethnicity, work, justice, legacy, and place.

This Salish Sea place-based course applies to the Canadian-American Studies major and minor, as well as the Salish Sea Studies minor.

Texts

  • Burning Water by George Bowering
  • Discovery Passages by Garry Thomas Morse (Kwakwaka’wakw)
  • Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson (Haisla/Heiltsuk)

ENG 335 Global Texts Outside N.Am &Eur

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent.

CRN: 12497 Day/Time: MWF 2:30-4:00 Instructor: Wise, Christopher

Arabism, Zionism, & BDS

This course will focus on the historical literature of Arab Nationalism, the Pan-Arab Movement, and Jewish Nationalism (or “Zionism”), as well as the rise of the BDS Movement in Palestine (Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions); hence, we will read the literature of Arab and Jewish writers in Israel and Palestine, including Sephardic (Maghrebian and/or Spanish), Mizrahim (Arab or Middle Eastern), and Aschkenazi (European) Jews. One goal of this course is to orient students to the complex history of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and its on-going impact on the Middle East, U.S. foreign policy, and global affairs. However, this is a literature course rather than a course in history, religion, or political science. We will therefore perform close readings of major texts on the themes of Arabism and Zionism, especially from the time of the Israeli Occupation to the present, with the goal of understanding the themes that impact the literature of Arab and Jewish peoples of the Middle East, relative to this conflict.  Authors studied will include Theodor Herzl, Gamel Abdel Nasser, Michel Aflaq, Sigmund Freud, Edward Said, Mahmud Darwish, Israel Shahak, Jacques Derrida, Ella Shohat, Jaqueline Rose, and others. Students will not be expected to adopt the professor’s own political views; they will be expected to demonstrate their own complex and nuanced understanding of the texts under consideration.

Course Requirements: Besides regular course participation [25%], students will be required to take a mid-term exam [25%] and a final exam [25%].  They will also write one formal paper on a topic related to course themes [25%].

ENG 338 Women's Lit N Am and Europe

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. BCGM.

CRN: 10301 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Pagh, Nancy

Students in English 338 study literature by writers who identify as women (writing that has been historically sidelined from the literary canon) and consider literary production and culture through the lens of gender.  In this section of Women & Literature we approach the topic through the works of three renowned authors, acclaimed not only for their creative writing (poems, memoirs, stories) but also for their groundbreaking publications on the material and labor conditions of the woman writer (Virginia Woolf); intersectional feminism, queer theory, and critical race studies (Audre Lorde); and the postcolonial re-claiming of silenced indigenous experience and forms of expression (Joy Harjo).

This section is currently being planned as a remote-learning course; assignments and evaluation are under construction and will be posted on Canvas before the quarter begins.  But the required textbooks will remain stable; please note that the print (not digital) editions listed below are required:

  • Audre Lorde, The Selected Works of Audre Lorde (Roxane Gay, ed),
  • Norton.  978-1324004615
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, Mariner annotated edition.
  •  978-0156030410
  • Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway, Mariner annotated edition.
  •  978-0156030359
  • Gloria Bird & Joy Harjo (eds), Reinventing the Enemy's Language:
  • Contemporary Native Women's Writings of North America, Norton.  978-0393318289
  • + supplemental reading (through Canvas) from Joy Harjo

Please purchase texts early for less-expensive used editions and consider buying through your local independent seller or campus store.

ENG 347 Studies in Young Adult Lit

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202 or instructor permission. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10769 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Hardman, Pam

In this course we’ll read a diverse array of texts written for young adults. These books all address complex notions about identity, power, race, sexuality, gender, class, love, and voice. We’ll explore the texts from a variety of angles, asking questions of the texts themselves and readers’ responses to the texts. In addition to exploring the books, we’ll think about the histories of childhood and adolescence, and how youth culture is represented.  We’ll address issues of consumerism, popular culture, and technology, looking at their effects on this genre of literature and its target audience. You should expect much intensive reading and lively discussion.

TEXTS:  may include Trung Le Nguyen, The Magic Fish; A.S. King, Dig; Elizabeth Acevedo, The Poet X; Lita Judge, Mary’s Monster; Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale, eds., Dreaming in Indian; Walter Dean Myers, Monster

ASSIGNMENTS: Reading responses; discussion questions; culminating mixed-media project

ENG 350 Intro to Creative Writing

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10138 Day/Time: MWF 02:30-03:50 Instructor: Yeasting, Jeanne Ellen 

This creative writing seminar will focus on creating and revising original creative nonfiction in a variety of forms (memoir, lyric, hybrid).  We’ll read and study the work of some earlier practitioners of creative nonfiction, as well as contemporary authors. Class will be a mixture of discussion of assigned writing models, writing exercises, and workshops.  Students may be required to complete a collaborative project, write critical reviews, conduct research, and/or attend a local literary event.

EVALUATION: Based primarily on active and attentive class participation and fulfillment of assignments, including a Final Project.

REQUIRED TEXTS:  

  • Alison Bechdel, The Secret to Superhuman Strength. Mariner Books, 2021. Hardback ISBN: 978-0544387651; also available in e-book
  • Mark Doty, Still Life with Oysters and Lemon. Beacon Press.  2002 Paperback ISBN: 978-0807066096; also available in Kindle
  •  Maggie Nelson, Bluets. Wave Books. 2009. Paperback IBSN: 978-1933517407
  • Lemn Sissay, My Name is Why. Canongate Books.  2021. Paperback ISBN: ‎ 978-1786892362;  DO NOT ORDER the e-book of Sissay's memoir as the graphics are impossible to read.
  • Selected texts on Canvas
  • Optional text: John D'Agata, editor. The Next American Essay, Graywolf Press. 2003.               Paperback: ISBN: 978-1555973759

CRN: 10430 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Magee, Kelly

This course will introduce students to three genres of creative writing: fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Students will learn about the forms and conventions of each genre, as well as ways to combine genres and use crossover techniques. There will be a good deal of discussion of both published texts and students’ own writing, as the class focuses on how to read as writers and put that learning into practice. Students will move between individual writing exercises and the creation of complete pieces, working toward a portfolio of creative work that will demonstrate their growing understanding of creative writing as an art. Assignments will be a mix of responses to peer and published work and creative submissions.

CRN: 13123 Day/Time: TR 08:00-09:50 Instructor: McGuire, Simon

In this course we will explore, discuss, practice and revise forms of poetry, short fiction and creative non-fiction. I'll introduce you to exercises in ekphrasis (writing about art), traditional forms, poetry machines and current trends in contemporary poetics (visual poetry, collaborative writing methods, conceptual writing, multilingual pieces.). While we all will work remotely, everyone will be required to participate each week in small group discussion forums to read and responds to assignments and complete attentive peer reviews. This course uses Imaginative Writing (4th ed.) as a main text, and I will offer other documents and sources on Canvas.

CRN: 13124 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Colen, Elizabeth

With emphasis on exposure and practice, this course is for students who wish to study, analyze, and experiment with three major genres of creative writing: fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, and techniques specific to each of them. Students will be expected to closely read and analyze published writing, generate their own work every week, effectively and responsively workshop their peers’ writing, and gain proficiency in the art of revision.

CRN: 13907 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Wong, Jane

“By writing I put order in the world, give it a handle so I can grasp it.  I write because life does not appease my appetites and hunger.  I write to record what others erase when I speak, to rewrite the stories others have miswritten about me, about you.  To become more intimate with myself and you.  To discover myself, to preserve myself, to make myself, to achieve self-autonomy.” – Gloria Anzaldúa
 
English 350 is a foundational-level course in creative writing that introduces writers to the history, craft, and practice of writing across multiple genres. We will read the work of diverse writers, including the work of your peers. By exploring these texts as readers, we will get a better sense of how language and form work (or don’t work) and how we can begin to cultivate our own styles and literary voices. Throughout the quarter, we will return to certain questions: How can we use language to convey the unconveyable? How can words on a page move us? How can we play with language and form in an innovative, challenging, and productive way? We will be engaging multiple genres in this course, including poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and hybrid work. You will be expected to generate creative pieces for workshop, feedback letters, and a final portfolio of revised writing. Together, we will build a robust community centered around our literary growth. Additionally, we will invite visiting guest writers to our class this quarter, moving writing from the page and into the real world.

ENG 351 Intro to Fiction Writing

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 350. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10005 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Araki-Kawaguchi, Kiik 

As a participant in this course, we will ask you to develop fictional worlds, characters and predicaments. We will have conversations about the fundamental elements of fiction (e.g. tense, pov, dialog, voice, conflict), as we examine both a diverse body of published work and the early drafts by your peers.

Expect this to be an exciting and challenging course. We hope you will develop new ways of thinking, working, writing and communicating. We hope you will take risks. You do not have to write magnificent fiction to do well in this course. You will have to be brave, respectful and a hard worker.

Participation in a 5-credit course is equivalent to 150 hours of work over the quarter. This will include 4 hours of classroom time weekly (lecture, discussions, workshop) and approximately 10 hours of outside preparation (reading, writing, investigating, reflecting, projects). You are also encouraged to visit me in office hours, attend literary events, and connect with your peers.

Required readings include Wonderbook by Jeff VanderMeer, The Big Book of Modern Fantasy edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, and If the Body Allows It by Megan Cummins. I am also asking that you find access to a portable electronic device that will allow you to listen to a podcast and move simultaneously (e.g. walk or dance).

CRN: 10531 Day/Time: TR 08:00-09:50 Instructor: Guess, Carol

This course will introduce you to the fundamentals of writing literary fiction. We’ll focus on five elements: language, character, plot, dialogue, and theme. Readings will correspond to each element. Assignments include several short stories and one longer work.

ENG 353 Introduction to Poetry Writing

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 353. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10086 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: Wong, Jane

Language is curious. Language is an archeological dig, a translucent fish. In this class, we will turn over the rock and see what’s underneath. We’ll discover that language is malleable, evocative, elusive, and ferocious. In addition to language, we will test our curiosity with genre, form, and content. We will read and write poetry. And then we will question these genres. Be prepared to challenge yourself aesthetically, thematically, and formally. Throughout the quarter, we will return to certain questions: How can we use language to convey the unconveyable? How can words on a page move us? How can we play with language and form in an innovative, challenging, and productive way? English 353 is a foundational-level course that introduces writers to the history, craft, and practice of poetry writing. To help us explore the above questions, we will read the work of diverse writers, including the work of your peers. By interrogating and exploring these texts as readers, we will get a better sense of how language and structure work (or don’t work) and how we can begin to cultivate our own styles and literary voices. You will be expected to generate creative pieces for workshop, feedback letters, and a final portfolio of revised work. Additionally, we will invite award-winning visiting guest poets to our class this quarter, moving writing from the page and into the real world.

ENG 354 Intro to Creative Nonfict Writ

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 350. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10409 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Miller, Brenda

In this time of global struggle, personal stories matter more than ever. This course is an introduction to the broad genre of creative nonfiction, exploring a variety of personal essay topics and forms. As an intensive generative writing workshop, you will write new work every week, practicing the fundamental skills of creative nonfiction and expanding your range of techniques. We will study classic, contemporary, and emerging forms, and by the end of the course you will have a substantial body of new work and a more nuanced understanding of creative nonfiction.

Text:

  • Tell it Slant: Creating, Revising, and Publishing Creative Nonfiction, 3rd Edition, Miller/Paola, 2019

CRN: 12590 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Pagh, Nancy  

Students in this section of English 354 will explore a range of forms and themes in the literary genre of creative nonfiction.  Through theorizing the ethics of "truth" telling, close reading and analysis of example texts, and immersion in the process of exploratory writing, drafting, revising, and polishing personal essays, participants will come to better understand and express their language, themselves, and their world.

This course is currently planned in remote-learning modality.  Assignments and evaluation practices will be posted on Canvas before the quarter begins.

Required Books

  • Tell It Slant: Creating, Refining, and Publishing Creative Nonfiction (3rd edition, McGraw Hill, 2019)
  • The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction (Simon & Schuster, 2007)
  • Several personal essays posted on Canvas

Please purchase texts early for less-expensive used editions and consider buying through your local independent seller or campus

ENG 364 Introduction to Film Studies

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101.

CRN: 10356 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Film Viewing: W 05:00-07:50 Instructor: Odabasi, Eren

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the key components of film expression such as cinematography, sound, editing, and production design. We will closely analyze several canonical films from around the world, utilizing the fundamental concepts and definitions covered in the course units. Furthermore, we will explore cinema’s relationship to other arts and various media forms.

More specific course objectives:

  • Enrich your ability to look and listen closely to motion pictures
  • Understand and apply a range of critical and cultural theories to the study of cinema
  • Explore a range of film genres, national cinemas, historical periods, and auteurs, with an emphasis on expanding the frame from Hollywood to a more diverse world cinema
  • Engage with local film cultures and other communities rooted in cinephilia

Textbook:

  • David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, Jeff Smith. Film Art: An Introduction, 12th edition. New York, NY: McGraw Hill Education, 2019.

You are welcome to use an older edition, a used copy, or the e-book version.

ENG 365 FilmHist:Contemp.WorldCinema

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 364 or ENG 202.

CRN: 11538 T 04:00-06:50 Film viewing: Tuesdays, 4:00-6:50. Instructor: Odabasi, Eren

Contemporary World Cinema

This course explores several evolving and flexible notions including national cinemas, transnational media production, digital filmmaking, blockbuster culture, film festivals, spectatorship and fandom in the context of contemporary world cinema.

While it carries the debatable term “world cinema” in its title, this course does not solely focus on “foreign” or “international” cinemas. We will study directors from new centers of exciting cinematic activity (such as Southeast Asia and Latin America), English-speaking territories (UK, Australia) and continental Europe alike. Throughout our discussions, we will see many different channels through which these regional borders are challenged; including but not limited to financial or institutional mechanisms, production practices, and cinematic kinship among directors from various backgrounds.

Within the scope of this course, the word “contemporary” functions as a tool to keep our endeavor focused and manageable rather than referring to a particular time period. One of the main objectives of this course is to provide students a balanced mix of established and emerging directors, highlighting the connections between their works and building bridges across generations.  

Books

The text book for this course is available in e-book format from Western Libraries. Please use your WWU credentials to access the book:

  • World Cinemas, Transnational Perspectives. Edited by Natasa Duravicova and Kathleen Newman, Routledge, 2010

ENG 371 Rhetorical Practices

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101 and junior status. Major restrictions will be lifted on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 4:30pm.

CRN: 13928 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Qualley, Donna

One of the oldest definitions of rhetoric comes from Aristotle: Rhetoric is discovering (or inventing) in any given case, the available means of persuasion. Aristotle was big on words. But in an image-driven, post-truth world where words and facts and evidence and “good reasons” no longer seem sufficient to compel us to listen, to think, or to act differently, do we need some new rhetorical practices for listening and communicating otherwise? What might such rhetorical practices look like? Where might we find examples of such a rhetoric?  

To begin to explore this questions and others, we’ll dig into some historical and contemporary perspectives about rhetorical theory so that we can better articulate for ourselves the strange and complex ways persuasion emerges and functions in the world today.  You’ll have a chance to work with different concepts and practices through in-class activities and exploratory responses.  Throughout the quarter, we will also be looking at examples of YouTube informational “edutainment” video channels. Taking a cue from Mike Rungetta of the Idea Channel, who begins almost every episode with “Here’s an Idea,” our culminating project will be to create a “Here’s a (Rhetorical) Idea” video (alone or with a partner) educating us about a rhetorical concept and practice in a compelling way.  

ENG 397L Multimodal Literature

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 202; or instructor permission. Counts as literature elective for creative writing majors. Counts toward the 1 300-level literature elective for literature majors. Teaching endorsement students please contact advisor if interested in course.

CRN: 13953 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Dietrich, Dawn

This course will introduce you to the radical creativity of the indie comix scene that largely originated in Seattle. Focusing on handmade comics and contemporary indie presses, we will explore the intersectional themes of identity, community, and agency. Through our diverse range of texts, we will try to articulate and understand the strange, the beautiful, the complex, and the interesting . . . in these graphic narratives. The selected texts feature marginalized and under-represented characters and themes, including topics such as love and friendship (relationship building), depression, sexuality, resiliency, loneliness/isolation, and mental and physical abuse. We will celebrate comix as a potentially queer space where openness, fluidity, and non-conformity represent textual strategies as well as characters’ identities. The themes in these writers’ work intersect and overlap with politics and rebellion while issues of diversity and inclusion are brought to the fore in a contemporary context. We will also study comix form, technique and theory, and you will have the opportunity to write about comix as well as create your own comix in the course. No artistic experience or illustrating talent is required for this assignment or this class! I also invite you to share your favorite comix or web comix throughout the quarter.

*Please note: this class content contains adult language and themes.

Assignments and Evaluation

You will have the opportunity to write multi-modal blogs and to engage in comix production. You will receive full credit for doing Lynda Barry’s art experiments, which are totally fun! No artistic experience or illustrating talent is required. And the capstone project will involve creating your own short comix! This seminar is geared for both literature and creative writing students.

Required Texts

  • Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud (PDF available)
  • Comix Samples, Eroyn Franklin (online)
  • Skim, Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki
  • Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me, Mariko Tamaki and Rosemary Valero-O’Connell
  • Hot Comb, Ebony Flowers
  • Making Comics, Lynda Barry
  • My Favorite Thing is Monsters (vol. 1), Emil Ferris
  • Megahex, Simon Hanselmann
  • The Pervert, Michelle Perez & Remy Boydell
  • Sabrina, Nick Drnaso
  • Free Comic Book Day’s (FCBD) Our Favorite Thing is My Favorite Thing is Monsters, Emil Ferris (PDF available)

400-Level English Courses

ENG 401 Sr Writing Studies/Rhet Sem

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 301 or ENG 302 or ENG 370 or ENG 371, or instructor permission; senior status. Major restrictions will be lifted on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 4:30pm.

CRN: 11386 Day/Time: MWF 01:00-02:20 Instructor: Qualley, Donna

Rhetoric of Style

This seminar explores the rhetoric and performance of style.  Stylistic conventions help writers manage their relationships with readers, placing them in a comfortable frame of mind by meeting previously established expectations. While conventions do not have to  be rigid, they can be unconsciously reinforced by habitual use. However, in many situations, the audience doesn’t want comfort. They want to be surprised and delighted, not just by what the writer/composer says, but how they say it, how they do it, how they perform it. And surprise often involves violating, transgressing, or suspending at least some conventional expectations. In truth, we really only notice “style” when it starts to deviate from expectations, routine, and convention. 

This seminar is both a study of and studio in style.  We’ll read and examine, emulate and invent. Part of our time in class will be spent in studio mode, exploring how small changes in our texts can create big rhetorical effects . We’ll try our hand at some conventional prose forms before inventing and experimenting with more “deviant” styles, modalities, and approaches as we make and remake our compositions in different ways. A good part of our work will be spent paying attention to those elements that normally escape our notice. What difference does it make and for whom does it make a difference when I say/do something this way rather than that way?  Weekly reading, writing samplers, and a final digital gallery project

ENG 402 Writing & Community Engagement

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 302. WP3. Major restrictions will be lifted on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 4:30pm.

CRN: 10630 Day/Time: TR 04:00-05:50 Instructor: Brown, Nicole

In this community-based, field-work course, students gain real-world professional writing experience by working intensively with a local non-profit. Working in teams, students invent, design, build, and implement documentation for their team’s specific community partner.
In this course you’ll team up with other students to help solve problems and build documents for specific non-profit organizations within the greater Bellingham area. You’ll be building documents that go to work in the worlds in which you act.

So a large part of this course will consist of practicing how to best discern and respond to the needs of specific community partners. The work we do will help you expand your competency for writing in context, project management, document design, teamwork, research, and using differing digital technologies.

By closely considering the importance of the contexts out of which your projects arise, you’ll discover some new things not only about the power and often serious consequences of writing and designing, but also about yourself. I mean, success in college and certainly in the world outside the classroom generally involves more than simply knowing how to read and write. Learning to write and design (or compose) alongside community patterns and within moving and morphing environments will benefit you regardless of the life you’re chasing after. Simply put, good writing, in whatever form it takes, can make lots happen. And that’s what I hope we’re going to do together, make things happen.

ENG 408 Cultural Studies

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 313 or ENG 314; two courses from: ENG 307-347, ENG 364 or ENG 371. WP3. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 12292 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Lee, Jean

Black Lives Matter

The Black Lives Matter movement has reverberated globally, throughout North America, Latin America, Africa, the Caribbean, and Europe. While local contexts are crucial, this global phenomenon highlights the need for a transnational analysis of the political economies of injustices/inequalities that have subjugated Black Africans and people of African descent. This class will introduce students to theories from interdisciplinary fields such as critical Black studies, postcolonial studies, womanism, and feminism that elaborate on the structural subjugation of these populations as an interrelated process. We will also engage with how Black African and Afro-diasporic populations produce counterhegemonic aesthetic, social, and political movements in efforts to redistribute resources and reimagine political futurities. In addition to analyzing how activists have taken to the digital sphere to protest and organize, we will read poems, essays, memoirs, and novels that speak to the current moment, but also draw connections across anti-colonial and contemporary anti-racist movements.

CRN: 13954 Day/Time: MWF 1:00-2:20 Instructor: Wise, Christopher

ENG 410 Lit Hist

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202; plus three from: ENG 307-347, ENG 364, ENG 371. WP3. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 11949 Day/Time: MWF 01:00-02:20 Instructor: Yu, Ning

A Cross-Cultural History of Nature Writing
 
This course helps students develop a working history of an important literary genre, nature writing, which evolves into what now people call environmental literature. We start with the Chinese poetry in Tang Dynasty (618-907) and trace its influence on three Japanese Hiku masters (Basho, 1644-1694; Busan, 1716-1783; Issa, 1763-1827). Then we travel over oceans to study the way the English gentleman Gilbert White (1720-1793) observes closely the environment of his hometown Selborne. White’s influence can be clearly seen in the works of Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) who allegedly founded the “Thoreavian tradition” in environmental literature. In the twentieth century, women played an important role in environmental studies and made their voice heard clearly. We will read Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring and Linda Hogan’s Dwellings. At the end of the quarter, we will have formed our own history of nature/environmental literature.
 
Requirements:

  1. Careful reading. Students must read all the assigned texts carefully and be well prepared to discuss them in depth. Active participation in class discussion is a must for a successful student.
  2. Each student is responsible for five (5) thought-provoking, well-written questions about the assigned texts and a two-page written response to each of your questions. You will post them by 8 pm the evening before discussion so that the instructor can organize his lecture and discussion in response to your questions and thus offer you a class centered on questions and issues that you find important. When we are responding to your question in class, you, with the help of your written response, will lead the discussion because you are the expert in this subject. These written responses are actually short essays.
  3. Write a final essay comparing/contrasting at least two texts and demonstrate the evolution of the genre of nature/environmental writing as demonstrated in these texts.
  4. You will read a book of eco-criticism chosen from a list provided by the instructor and do a presentation on it towards the end of the quarter.
  5. Last but not the least, regular attendance is required. The student will lose 3% of their total grade for each unexcused absence. No student with more than three unexcused absences will get a grade higher than C+ no matter how well s/he does in the class otherwise. Students should treat their peers with respect.  Accommodation for disabled students may be processed through disability office.  During class, electronics including cell phones and lap-tops should be turned off and put away. Thank you.

Evaluation: Class participation = 20% of total grade; final essay=30%; written questions and responses = 30% (6% per question and response); presentation 20%.

ENG 418 Sr Sem:

Notes & Prerequisites: Senior status; ENG 313 or ENG 314; and one course from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310 or ENG 311. Opens to Juniors at 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10466 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Yu, Ning

Seminar on American Environmental Literature
 

This course surveys a variety of texts about “nature” by American authors and helps students develop a more refined sense of the non-human environment and a better understanding of their own responses to it.  The successful student must participate actively in class discussion (15% of total grade), write five five-page essays ( 50%, 10% per essay), write five questions for class discussion (25%, 5% per question and response), and give an oral presentation (10%).

Requirements: 

  1. Careful reading. Students must read all the assigned texts carefully and be well prepared to discuss them in depth. Active participation in class discussion is a must for a successful student.
  2. Each student will find a place in nature where s/he feels comfortable to visit every other week and write a five-page essay (double-space, font 12) about the place and especially about his/her relationship with it, a relationship hopefully enriched by our reading.  This place should be safe and close to you, with some shelter where you can write without getting soaked in famous winter rain of Bellingham.  Our objective is to cultivate a connection between the texts, our life, and the place of our choice. However, for a couple years we have two important new elements, the self-quarantine and the recent return to campus. You may want to approach your essays and assigned reading from the current situation. Therefore, I suggest that you choose place can be your backyard, a favorite fishing spot of your childhood, a family farm, your grandparents’ cabin in the woods, or a city/state park near you, some place that is SAFE and OPEN, with good air circulation and some shelter. Make sure you protect yourself by wearing a mask and keeping social distancing. Our objective is to reflect on our lifestyle and its relationship with the nonhuman environment, including our current unpleasant lifestyle and what caused it. If you have a pet, a favorite wild animal or some in-depth about wildlife in general, you may organize your essays around them.  I hereby recommend some topics for your writing, and I support you if you prefer to choose your own topics:
    1. Describe exactly where your place is and why you've chosen it, especially why this place is helpful for coping with the coronavirus crisis we are having, including its psychological effect upon us.  To avoid a mere listing of physical items, you may want to reflect on what among the things you describe can be defined as “natural” and what should be read as cultural, historical and social construct.
    2. We have lived a “stay home, stay safe” lifestyle that is drastically different from our life before since the beginning of the year 2020. Reflect on this dramatic change and think about what role the non-human environment plays in our current life.
    3. David Wallace-Wells, in his book The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming, suggests that global warming, although appears to us to be a slow process, may cause a sudden catastrophe. Using our place as a point of focus, discuss whether you agree or disagree with that argument.
    4. Some say that the coronavirus is a way in which the earth is handling the human pests. Based upon the readings of this class, what do you think about that explanation? If you believe that the virus was human-made, or even some kind of conspiracy theory, write about it. In sum, do we deserve this punishment or is it in some way a self-inflicted wound? Important: who the heck are we ? In sum, how do you read our life in the pandemic?
    5. Expand the previous four essays into a unified longer essay of 12-18 pages, with an additional focus around which you organize the four essays. The focus is, given what we read in this quarter and what you observed in your place and what you have reflected about the pandemic and our return to school, what changes we should make in your life style after the crisis is over. Do you want to simply return to our lifestyle before the outbreak?       
  3. Building upon these short essays, you will give an oral presentation in class. You have about 15 minutes to present your place and then about 5 minutes to respond to questions and comments from your audience.
  4. Each student is responsible for five thought-provoking, well-written questions with one full page of written response to each of them about the assigned texts.  You will submit them by 6 pm the evening before discussion so that the instructor can organize his lecture and discussion in response to your questions and thus offer you a student-centered class.
  5. Last but not least, regular attendance is required. The student will lose 3% of their total grade for each unexcused absence.  No student with more than three unexcused absences will get a grade higher than C+ no matter how well s/he does in the class otherwise. Severe tardiness (20 minutes or more) will also impact your final grade negatively.
  6. Students must treat their peers with respect. Accommodation for disabled students should be processed through disability office. I will offer reasonable accommodations for religious holidays.

 
Evaluation: Class participation = 15% of total grade; essays = 50%; written questions = 25% (5% per question and response);  oral presentation = 10%.

CRN: 10467 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: Amendt-Raduege, Amy

Medieval Fantasies

The medieval world was a magical place, populated by elves and fairies, monsters and marvels, goblins and trolls and things that go bump in the night - at least in the legends and stories that come down to us.  We tend to study the more “serious” texts, but the truth is that folktales and fantasies reveal a great deal about medieval society.  Furthermore, those tales and legends continue to exert a powerful influence on our own culture, shaping everything from blockbuster movies to top-selling video games.  This class will delve into both original works and contemporary incarnations, seeking to understand the links between medieval and modern texts and the human need to dream that underlies it all. 

ENG 423 Maj Auth:

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371; possible additional prerequisites relevant to topic. WP3. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10741 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Dugger, Julie

Jane Austen

What is it with Jane Austen? Why do so many people read her today, and so devotedly? Why are her books a source for seemingly endless adaptations and rewritings? What makes them fodder for fan culture? Why are they still relevant?

Students in this class will read three works by Austen: Mansfield Park, Persuasion, and Pride and Prejudice. Through close reading and analysis of primary and critical sources, we'll try to figure out what makes an Austen novel tick, then assess the relationship between these novels and some of their adaptations. We'll also look at Austen fan culture, both through literary portrayals (Kipling's "Janeites" and Fowler's Jane Austen Book Club), and through observation of contemporary venues for Austen devotees. Throughout the course, we'll consider what happens when an author becomes a hero and how the critical analysis of literature compares to other, less academic forms of reading. Students will complete a 12-15 page research paper on an Austen topic of their selection, and should be prepared to encounter a lot of reading and a fair amount of worshipful gushing.

CRN: 10357 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Prichard, Tony

Jeff VanderMeer

We will look at Jeff VanderMeer’s work as an author, editor, and instructor and how he has contributed to not only movements of speculative fiction but to conversations around ecological thought. VanderMeer not only challenges concepts of nature writing as well as the anthropocentric grounding of the novel as a form. In his Area X trilogy he works with a local place, the St. Mark’s Wildlife Refuge in Florida, and makes it weird. His connection to St. Mark’s and the area around it continues in his donating of a portion of all of his book sales to support the Refuge as well as his continued efforts to “re-wild” his home, which he documents on social media as well as in articles if various publications.

Required Texts

Note on purchasing the texts: VanderMeer works closely with his local bookstore in Tallahassee, Midtown Reader. If you want autographed and personalized copies of the texts, or to donate to protect the Frosted Flatwood Salamander you may do so by ordering from them: https://www.midtownreader-shop.com/jeff-vandermeer-signed-copies

  • Ambergris Trilogy (Cites of Saints and Madmen, Shriek: An Afterword, and Finch)
  • Area X Trilogy (Annihilation, Authority, Acceptance)
  • Borne
  • Strange Bird
  • Dead Astronauts
  • Wonderbook: The illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction

Recommended

  • None of this is Normal: The Fiction of Jeff VanderMeer by Benjamin J. Robertson

ENG 441 Language and the Sec Classroom

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 301, ENG 302 or ENG 371; ENG 347; ENG 350, ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354; two from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, ENG 311, ENG 317, ENG 318, ENG 319, ENG 320 and ENG 321. Co-requisite: ENG 443. Major restrictions never lift.

CRN: 13135 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: VanderStaay, Steven

This course will explore language structure and use in the Secondary Language Arts classroom, including cultural and equity issues, dialect and discourse style bias, ESL learners, and the challenges of standard grammar and conventions.  We’ll spend some time addressing linguistic fundamentals as a means of understanding language diversity. This methods course requires the same kind of individual initiative, dedication, and professionalism that you will apply to your future work as a teacher.

ENG 443 Tch Eng Lang Arts in Sec Sch I

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 301, ENG 302 or ENG 371; ENG 347; ENG 350; and two courses from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, ENG 311, ENG 317, ENG 318, ENG 319, ENG 320 and ENG 321.Co-requisite: ENG 441. Major restrictions never lift.

CRN: 10090 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: VanderStaay, Steven

This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence designed to help you become a thoughtful, knowledgeable, and effective teacher of English language arts at the secondary level. In this first quarter, we emphasize the teaching of writing, though oral performance, literature, and media will be integrally linked. Through the frames of pedagogical theories, we will connect what we know about the diverse student population that secondary teachers face with what we know about ourselves as language arts learners and teachers in order to create useable teaching materials. This is a writing and reading intensive course. This methods course requires the same kind of individual initiative, dedication, and professionalism that you will apply to your future work as a teacher.

This course must be taken concurrently with English 441 unless the instructor approves otherwise.

ASSIGNMENTS: Writing Activities; Mini-lesson; Writing Assignment Plan

TEXTS: Kelly Gallagher, Write Like This

ENG 444 Tch Eng Lang Art in Sec Sch II

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 443.

CRN: 10742 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Hardman, Pam

This course focuses on the teaching of skills related to reading, interpretation, and critical analysis of literature and other media in secondary school classrooms. The course will also address the specifics of lesson and unit planning.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assigned reading; lesson plans; discussion plan and performance; unit plan

TEXTS: may include Kelly Gallagher, Deeper Reading; Kelly Gallagher and Penny Kittle, 180 Days; A.S. King, Dig

ENG 451 Creative Wrtng Seminar:Fiction

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10139 Day/Time: MWF 02:30-03:50 Instructor: Trueblood, Kathryn

“First drafts are for learning what your novel or story is about. The first draft is the most uncertain—where you need guts, the ability to accept the imperfect until it is better.”

—Bernard Malamud


This workshop will be devoted to converting life stories into fiction of all genres, and it operates on the premise that all fiction is autobiographical, though it may be only emotionally autobiographical. Even if your character is captured by an alien space ship and taken to a planet billions of miles away from Earth called Tralfamadore, there has to be some emotional stake in it for you, some life question that you need to work out. Without a genuine emotional connection, we tend to write fiction that is more of a head game than a high stakes emotional experience for the reader. We will aspire to write scenes, those units of dramatic action in which characters speak and act, as opposed to summaries or treatments, because scenes are the dramatic building blocks of fiction. Writers also need to be strongly grounded in the questions of their own era, so we shall undertake subjects specific to your generation. We also have the chance to read a range of published short stories and discuss them in the spirit of shared inquiry. Close observation of published work is how writers learn to write. Then we will devote ourselves to each other’s written work in small focus groups.

CRN: 10631 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Westhoff, Kami

Welcome to English 451! This course is designed to encourage you to continue your exploration into the complex world of creating literary fiction. We will read the work of contemporary fiction writers and examine the ways in which they create compelling and innovative fiction through careful and unique attention to such elements as character development, setting, theme, format, and narrative focus. In addition to extensive fiction writing, you will be asked to engage with the literary world on a larger scale, including literary journal research, and taking part in the process of submitting your own work. Showcasing your knowledge and creativity, you will produce a chapbook or a reading of your work as your final project.

ENG 453 Creative Wrtng Seminar: Poetry

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 353. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10401 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Shipley, Ely  

This seminar focuses on the practice of reading and writing poetry. We will spend the quarter reading, writing, and discussing poems and poetics essays through focusing on elements such as metaphor, image, rhythm, sound, line, and dramatic tension. You will share original work and offer thoughtful observations to each work discussed. The texts for this course explore poetic traditions and contemporary developments. Likewise, they span diverse embodiments of sexual, racial, national, class-based, and familial experiences. Examining the artistic attributes of these texts, we will seek to understand form’s relationship to content and how poems work to generate experience. Through deep analysis of varied and excellent models, we will amass resources and practice techniques to make our own poems and poetics statements. We become better writers through reading, thinking and feeling intensely, learning from our own work, the work of others, and above all, by practicing.

ENG 454 Creative Wrtg Sem: Nonfiction

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 454. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10380 Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:50 Instructor: Yeasting, Jeanne

This creative writing seminar will focus on creating and revising original creative nonfiction in a variety of forms (memoir, lyric, hybrid).  We’ll read and study the work of some earlier practitioners of creative nonfiction, as well as contemporary authors.  Class will be a mixture of discussion of assigned writing models, writing exercises, and workshops.  Students may be required to complete a collaborative project, write critical reviews, conduct research, and/or attend a local literary event.

Evaluation: Based primarily on active and attentive class participation and fulfillment of assignments, including a Final Project.

Required Texts: Students are expected to order the specific print editions of the books listed below; no exceptions.  No e-books.     

  • Bluets, Maggie Nelson. Wave Books. 2009. IBSN: 978-1933517407
  • To the River, Olivia Laing. Canongate Canons. 2017. ISBN: 978-1786891587
  • The Next American Essay, edited by John D'Agata.  Graywolf Press. 2003. ISBN: 978-1555973759
  • Plus one more book of creative nonfiction (TBA)
  • Selected texts on Canvas (must be printed and brought to class)

ENG 456 Special Topics Fiction Writing

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 13955 Day/Time: MWF 01:00-02:20 Instructor: Magee, Kelly

Cli-Fi

This is an advanced course in fiction writing on the subject of climate change—from monster storms and rising sea levels to techno-worlds and speculative futures. Most fiction attends to setting in some way, but in this class we’ll focus on it, reading and writing stories that intrinsically connect humanity to its environment. Students in this class will produce exercises in a range of fictional subgenres, as well as 1-2 open-topic full-length stories (writers of realism are just as welcome as science fiction enthusiasts). We’ll look at popular tropes in climate writing, including variations on the ever-popular post-apocalypse story, as well as new developments and possibilities—especially how writers connect this genre to political and social movements in the U.S. and abroad. Mostly, we’ll experiment with cli-fi as a unique form of writing, whether it serves as a warning or a source of hope.

ENG 459 Editing and Publishing

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10770 Day/Time: MWF 10:00-11:20 Instructor: Gulyas, Lee

This is a capstone course that offers an overview of publishing in the United States. Our explorations include the history of publishing; the wide variety of publishing houses and presses; literary careers and the business of publishing; and the literary Northwest.

COURSE GOALS

As upper-level writing students, you will:

  • explore the world of publishing and its place in our culture.
  • be introduced to skills including research, sources, copyediting, and proofreading, and be aware of the current literary conversation, discourses, and cultures of editing and publishing.
  • consider writing from the perspective of writer, editor, and publisher within the context of the industry, and be familiar with the roles of each.
  • understand how a book is made—from inception, to production, distribution, and promotion.
  • be familiar with some of the ethical issues and current trends in publishing, the politics of book buying, and how to engage and flourish as a member of a larger literary community.
  • actively work to increase your knowledge and skills and aim for professional standards.

Texts:

  • Eckstut, Arielle, and David Sterry.The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published, How To Write It, Sell It, and Market It—Successfully! New York: Workman Publishing, 2015.
  • Saller, Carol Fisher. The Subversive Copy Editor. Second Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2016.

CRN: 13137 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Westhoff, Kami

Welcome to English 459: Editing and Publishing. This class will ask you to engage in various exercises, activities, research, and projects related to the world of the writing, editing, and publishing of literary work. By the end of this course, you will have gained a more complex understanding some of its nuances, complications, opportunities, and rewards. Though we will cover an array of publishing elements, this course is tailored toward publishing in literary journals, which is often a writer’s first interaction with the publishing world.

ENG 460 Multi-Genre Wrtng

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 10444 Day/Time: MWF 08:30-09:50 Instructor: Araki-Kawaguchi, Kiik 

New Boundaries

As an active participant in this course, we will explore the ways in which genre offers shape and organization for the concerns and interests we want to write about.

We will primarily be focused on fiction and fantasy (as the VanderMeers say “the encounter with the not-real, no matter how slight) and their mixing with additional genre conventions (e.g. dark fantasy, romantic fantasy, comic fantasy). As we experiment, we hope to observe how our adherence or resistance to genre conventions offers new ways to explore complex themes and ideas.

Based on our materials and discussions, you will be asked to compose creative work in a multiplicity of shapes. We will do an intensive examination of the work produced in our workshop.

We will also have conversations about the ecosystem of fiction writing (e.g. conventions, predicaments, plot, dialog, character). Above all other academic concerns, we will privilege the lifelong concerns of the writer: development, process and community.

Expect this to be an exciting and challenging course. We hope you will develop new ways of thinking, working, writing and communicating. We hope you will take risks. You do not have to write a magnificent polished piece to do well in this course. You will have to be brave, respectful and a hard worker.

We will examine a diverse body of published work across genre boundaries. Required course materials include The People of Paper by Salvador Plascencia, Octavia’s Brood edited by Walidah Imarisha and adrienne maree brown, The Weird edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, and Wonderbook by Jeff VanderMeer. I am also asking that you find access to a portable electronic device that will allow you to listen to a podcast and move simultaneously (e.g. walk or dance).

CRN: 13956 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Gulyas, Lee R. 

Habit & Play

What is important at the beginning—of a draft, a quarter of study, or a writing life—is play. Craft elements and technique are choices, just as genre is a choice. And instead of choosing, or relying on familiarity and habit to choose for us, we will work on the qualities that any piece of work must have, regardless of genre. This advanced class will build upon our knowledge of craft, technique, and genre to dwell in ideas, to leave room for discovery and surprise. We will explore our work and patterns to create new practices and habits while considering our relationship to creativity itself. We will look for inspiration outside ourselves, and explore a range of skills and experiences through coursework including exercises, presentations, reading, writing, revision, analysis, and a final portfolio.

Texts

  • The Creative Habit: Learn It And Use It For Life, Twyla Tharp
  • Steal Like An Artist, Austin Kleon    

ENG 466 Screenwriting

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 364 or one from: ENG 350, ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354. Major restrictions will be lifted on Friday, Nov. 19, at 9:00am.

CRN: 13985 Day/Time: TR 04:00-05:50 Film Viewing: W 05:00-07:50 Instructor: Weed, Katie

Writing for the screen is an evolving endeavor. How we share and experience stories via screens is constantly in flux, so in this introduction to screenwriting course, we will explore writing for the screen in terms of both “traditional” and ever-growing contemporary formats and structures--with our central emphasis on creating meaningful stories and characters.

We’ll explore historical conventions of scriptwriting, read screenplays through multiple drafts, and engage with a variety of perspectives on storytelling and notions of craft. Projects will include storyboarding, writing treatments and coverage, creating loglines, pitching, and drafting and revising scripts of your own.

As Matthew Salesses--whose book Craft in the Real World we will work with, alongside other readings both about screenwriting specifically and dramatic writing generally--writes: “Make no mistake--writing is power. What this fact should prompt us to ask is: What kind of power is it, where does it come from, and what does it mean?” We will consider these questions, and questions inspired by them. We will reckon with genre, voice, and audiences. Together, we will watch and reflect on a range of screenplays and movies in a range of stages, formats, and languages: “classic” Hollywood films, popcorn flicks, indies, Netflix/streaming hits and misses, and shorts across platforms.

Through it all, we’ll consider what it can mean to be writers for the screen in 2022 and beyond, and the undeniable power of visual storytelling and in deciding what stories to tell.

Graduate English Courses

ENG 504 Seminar in Writing of Poetry

Opens to MAs after 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15.

CRN: 13986 Day/Time: TR 04:00-05:50 Instructor: Beasley, Bruce

This seminar will be an intensive examination of the poetry of the seminar participants and of the implicit and explicit poetics behind the generation and revision of those poems.  We’ll examine the role of poetry in contemporary culture and ask questions about what kind of poem we want to produce, and why; what kinds of poetic traditions we want to embrace, what kinds of traditions we want to reject, and why.  We’ll explore larger questions of the purpose of poetry and the ambitions of the seminar poets in the context of intensive seminar discussions of at least five poems per student. There will be weekly assignments for poems with a set of poetic challenges to generate new work, but with looseness to accommodate the work to your style, poetics, and obsessions.  We’ll work with multiple revisions of each poem and explore the revision process intensively. There will also be extensive readings in poetics and in poetry ranging from avant garde experimentation to innovative uses of form and reinventions of poetic traditions and poetic theory to accompany and give context for the discussions of poems by each seminar participant. 

ENG 505 Seminar in Writing Nonfiction

CRN: 13987 Day/Time: TR 12:00-1:50 Instructor: Paola, Suzanne

Opens to MAs after 10:30 on Monday, Nov. 15.

Michael Moore, accepting the Academy Award for “Bowling for Columbine,” told the audience that we need the nonfictional as we live in “fictitious times.” Our work in nonfiction will be a site for literary experimentation, social reckoning, witness, and the fascinating movements of the individual mind. We will discuss the work of self-construction in this genre, and the ways in which self-construction always involves power structures and questions of the oppressed body, the colonized body, the deemed-disabled body, the privileged body.

We live in a profoundly interesting time for this form. While reading will include historical nonfiction, we will also examine the relatively new urge to grapple with and define the chimera. The term “creative nonfiction” has only existed since the 1960s, for instance, and the popular term “lyric essay” since the late 1990s.

This class will be organized as both workshop and generative writing. You will create new work and use author-centered discussion to help it bloom. Our reading will include such writers as Sei Shonagon, Michel de Montaigne, and Sui Sin Far along with contemporary writers such as Jenny Boully, Kenny Fries, Teju Cole, Joanna Eleftheriou, Sisonke Msimang. We will study many forms, working with lists, photographs, hermit crab forms, hybrids, and more.

This class will also have a strong publishing component. This does NOT mean the kind of work that gears you toward a career in this field. Rather, we will work together to create individual publishing goals and publishing plans. We’ll also take a practical look at areas such as the large and getting-larger industry of predatory publishing. I want everyone to leave this seminar ready to begin their life as a publishing writer, understanding processes like the best ways to identify publishing venues. I also want you to be able to identify an unacceptable contract, be familiar with the wide variety of options such as hybrid or coop publishing and know the role of people like literary agents. Students will help to shape this area of the class.

ENG 510 Rhetoric:

CRN: 10323 Day/Time: TR 12:00-01:50 Instructor: Brown, Nicole

Rhetoric in the Making

In this course we will explore the intersections of the making of the discipline of Rhetoric and Composition and the praxis towards “worlding.”

The course will explore the rhetorical tradition and its longstanding attention to social and symbolic acts of “making”— the art of rhetoric, the discovery of invention, the craft of techne’, the thinking of heuristics, the composition and deconstruction of discourse, the social action of genres, the recovery of critique, and the multimodal assemblage of bodies, agency, and things.

Through exploring the importance of materialist thought in Rhetoric and Composition, we will participate with dialectical theories of materiality with nature-cultures, objects & things, writing, and the human situated and space-oriented rhetorical praxis of making and worlding. The course also places our scholarship in relationship with readings and reflections on the “maker’s movement” and the spirit of DIY (Do It Yourself) and the informal, highly networked, decentralized making of hacker aesthetics, tinkering, crafting, participatory design, and more.

Course projects include ongoing rhetorical analysis and reflection on the readings via Blog or Vlog (public or private), a Concept Zine (digital or print), and a “Thing.”  Through maker days, you will make a “Thing” and through the process of making this “Thing” you will build a scholarly presentation and paper about the becoming of the “Thing” in relationship to your interests in Rhet Comp, the broader world, and your desire to contribute to the making of a discipline.
 
If you are concerned about artistic or technological ability for any of the projects, know that we will focus on the making process and related scholarship, reflecting more on relationships with our making process and movements in the field of Rhetoric and Composition than on the product or "Thing" itself.

ENG 515 Crit Thry:

CRN: 13141 Day/Time: TR 10:00-11:50 Instructor: Metzger, Mary J.

Intersectional Feminist Theory

Course Objectives: In this course, we will explore the nature of feminist theory in the 20th and 21st centuries, with emphasis on its intersectionality and utility for the creative practice of resistance to the long history of heteropatriarchal white supremacist thought and practice. We will begin with Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own, but quickly move to the developments of Black Queer Theory, Indigenous Theory, and Critical Race Theory.

The works we will read will often defy traditional academic modes of thought and forms of writing. Backgrounds in these traditions of thought and/orpostcolonial theory, affect theory, structuralism, Marxism, philosophy, or postmodernism are welcome, but we will work consistently to explain the foundational ideas or histories of thought and practice that inform our readings. No prerequisites necessary except for a willingness to read a lot of challenging and exciting material and actively engage it in collaboration with others. As in all my theory courses, my principal aim is to help you find the theory/theorists that best help you do your most transformational work.

Course Assignments Beyond Readings: Reading Responses, Class Presentation, Short Citation Essay, In Class Work, Final Paper  (including a written proposal, a substantial draft, peer reviews, final draft) & Letter of Reflection.

Texts include Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider, Dean Spade’s Normal Life, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s As We Have Always Done, Patricia J. Williams, Alchemy of Race and rights, as well as essays & talks by writers such as Sara Ahmed, bell hooks, Kimberly Crenshaw, Gloria Anzaldua, Cathy Cohen, and others.

ENG 540 Globl Lits:

CRN: 13143 Day/Time: TR 08:00-09:50 Instructor: Heim, Stefania

Translation

Theories of translation teem with contradiction. Nobel Laureate Thomas Tranströmer has declared, “Theoretically we can, to some extent justly, look at poetry translation as an absurdity. But in practice, we must believe in poetry translation if we want to believe in World Literature.” Recently, MacArthur fellow John Keene has called forcefully for “not only more translators, but more black translators” to take on “more translation of literary works by non-Anglophone black diasporic authors.” While poet and translator Ammiel Alcalay has asserted: “In our post-NAFTA world, Americans feel they have a right to literatures from other parts of the world, much like they have a right to Chilean cherries in New York in the middle of January… In such circumstances, I think it may be wise to NOT translate certain things.” Countering oft touted ideals of fidelity and accuracy, MacArthur fellow Don Mee Choi has written, “As a foreigner, as foreign words myself, I seek incomprehensibility—a mirror image of myself.” And writing as language justice and language experimentation collaborative Antena Aire, JD Pluecker and Jen Hofer have asked: “Language is utterly necessary and utterly failed. What is right action?”

In this course on the theories and practices of literary translation, we will dive headlong into these conversations to explore the art, craft, theory, politics, and stakes of translating literature. We will ask what translation is, who it is for, how we should read, understand, and assess translations. In addition to encountering many theoretical takes, many of them experimental, we will spend time with multiple translations of the same text, approaching translation as the most intensive reading. We will do writing exercises that put translation theory into practice, also exploring modes of translation as generative for “original” writing. Foreign language knowledge is not a requirement for participation in this course.


Explore multiple translations of the same text
Scholarship and theories of translation
translation as the most intensive reading
Writing exercises that put translation theory into practice
Modes of translation of generative for “original” writing

from the line-by-line approach of Lydia Davis, to the “driving-in-the-dark” model of Peter Constantine, and several approaches in between.

Wang Wei
This Little Art
Venuti

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ENG 575 Studies in Women's Literature

CRN: 13988 Day/Time: TR 02:00-03:50 Instructor: Rivera, Lysa

Reading Xicanisma

This graduate seminar examines Chicana literary history, Chicanx queer theory, and Chicana feminist discourse since the Chicano Movement (1960s-70s). Briefly, Chicana feminist discourse (also known Xicanisma) encompasses the political, theoretical, and cultural work of women and trans women who self-identify as Chicana, a term usually reserved for politically engaged women of Mexican descent living in the United States. Working more or less chronologically, we will work together to understand and appreciate how the material, lived, and political conditions have animated Xicanisma and shaped its literary expressions. Our reading list is robust and includes literary texts across multiple genres and several book-length works of Chicana feminist theory, Chicanx queer theory, and Chicana history.


Required Reading:

  • Maylei Blackwell, ¡Chicana Power!: Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement  
  • Ana Castillo, So Far from God (novel)
  • T. Jackie Cuevas, Post-Borderlandia: Chicana Literature and Gender Variant Critique
  • Myriam Gurba, Mean (memoir)
  • Emma Peréz, Decolonial Imaginary: Writing Chicanas into History
  • Emma Peréz, Forgetting the Alamo, or Blood Memory (novel)
  • Helena María Viramontes, Their Dogs Came with Them (novel)
  • Excerpts from Borderlands/La Frontera (Anzaldúa), Chicana Feminist Thought: The Basic Historical Writings (Garcia), and Methodology of the Oppressed (Sandoval).