Liberal Studies Courses

Complete List of Liberal Study Courses & Course Descriptions

Liberal Studies 110:
CONFESSION AND SELF-PROMOTION: AUTOBIOGRAPHY FROM AUGUSTINE TO THE BLOGOSPHERE

5 credits; HUM; FYE; Class size: 20

No prerequisites. A first year experience course taught only in Fall Quarter. Enrollment is limited to entering first year students.

An examination of the historical origins of autobiographical writing in the European tradition, this class considers how individuals have imagined both themselves and their relationship to society. Through visual media (such as portraiture) and various written genres (from letters to trial records to essays), the class uses an interdisciplinary approach to introduce some important themes in European cultural history. Teaching is by lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by participation, a mid-term examination, and two assigned papers.

Liberal Studies 121, 122, 123:
HUMANITIES

5 credits each

An interdisciplinary introduction to the ideas, attitudes, and beliefs that have given shape to Western culture. These courses analyze significant themes in art, literature, philosophy, history, politics, and religion, and the interplay between them.

Each of these courses may be counted towards the Humanities GUR, and one may complete that GUR by taking all three courses.  Although they build upon one another, the courses in this series do not need to be taken in sequence and may be taken independently.

Liberal Studies 121:
THE WESTERN TRADITION I: THE ANCIENT WORLD

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites. May be taken in any order with 122 and 123 to satisfy the entire Humanities GUR (Option 2).

This course studies the Near Eastern and Mediterranean origins of Western culture through an examination of Mesopotamian, Hebrew, Greek, and Roman sources.  It considers ancient world views and conceptions of what it meant to be human.  Sections explore such varied topics as debates about knowledge and ideas about justice, gender, mortality and immortality; they examine the organization of ancient societies and their production of visual arts and architecture. Readings often include selections from the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Hebrew Bible, Greek plays, the Iliad or Odyssey, Plato, and Virgil's Aeneid.

Liberal Studies 122:
THE WESTERN TRADITION II: MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites. May be taken in any order with 121 and 123 to satisfy the entire Humanities GUR (Option 2).

This course is an introduction to the cultural history of medieval and early modern Europe (from the 4th to the 18th centuries) through an analysis of a wide variety of sources. It examines works of visual art, philosophy, rhetoric, literature, history, and religion, and considers a range of themes, from pilgrimage and the interaction between the sacred and the profane to disputes about authority, religious conflict, and imperial expansion.  Readings may include works by Augustine, Marie de France, Christine de Pizan, Erasmus, Camões, Shakespeare or Cervantes; all sections include Dante.

Liberal Studies 123:
THE WESTERN TRADITION III: THE MODERN WORLD

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites. May be taken in any order with 121 and 122 to satisfy the entire Humanities GUR (Option 2).

This course explores the construction of modernity.  As an introduction to modern Western culture from the 18th century to the present, it examines such modern ideologies as feminism, Romanticism, and nationalism.  This course considers a spectrum of views of the individual, of progress, and of the alienation and integration of the individual in society.  Many sections include study of films and other material from the visual arts.  Readings often include novels, and the writings of Freud, Marx, Nietzsche, Mill, Baudelaire, and Rousseau.

Liberal Studies 231:
INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF RELIGION

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

This course provides an introduction to the academic study of religion. Although scholars do not always agree about what they are studying when they study religion, they tend to concur that religious life is an important, perhaps the most important, aspect of human experience. The course will focus on four main case studies: Buddhist teaching stories, Hasidic Jewish spirituality and practice, Christian fundamentalist belief, and Muslim, Jewish and Christian apocalypticism.  Each unit will offer an overview of a major world religion, explore some major themes, and consider different models of social organization that structure religious life.  Evaluation is by class participation, in-class writing exercises, a paper, and two exams.

Liberal Studies 232:
MYTH AND FOLKLORE

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

A study of myth and folklore and its cultural impact. Students read selections from the mythologies and folklore of America, Europe, Asia and Africa to discover what meanings they have in their own cultural context for the people who narrate and listen to them, and universal patterns and meanings of myths.  The course also will consider the modern ‘myth’ of the Western frontier in stories and movies and modern interpretations of folktales in the maturation process.  Careful reading in preparation for class is essential. Evaluation is by exams and a 4-6 page paper.

Liberal Studies 243:
ART AND IDEAS

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

A study of Western humanities through the visual arts of sculpture, painting and architecture, the course explores values expressed through choices of style and subject matter in selected cultural periods.

Liberal Studies 265:
SCIENCE AND RELIGION IN AMERICAN CULTURE

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

Introduction to issues in the relationship between science and religion in American culture over the past 200 years.

Liberal Studies 271:
HUMANITIES OF INDIA

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

The Indian experience and the development of its cultural unity; the challenge of Islam and the British Colonial experiences; the conditions of Modernization and the emerging synthesis of values.

Liberal Studies 273:
ART AND SOCIETY IN CHINA AND JAPAN

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

The course examines aesthetic traditions of East Asia; the impact of foreign ideas and the role of art in recent propaganda, architecture, and industrial design as well as in traditional modes of expression.  Lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by essay exams.

Liberal Studies 275:
HUMANITIES OF JAPAN

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

Interdisciplinary introduction to Japanese civilization, both traditional and modern, with particular emphasis on religions, historical, artistic, and literary patterns; and societal and cultural ideas.  Evaluation is by a short paper and two exams, with extra credit for active class participation.

Liberal Studies 276:
HUMANITIES OF AFRICA

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

Introduction to the cultural heritage of sub-Saharan Africa, and to the contemporary civilization that draws upon it; emphasis on the process by which Africans currently build and use coherent account of their heritage.

Liberal Studies 277:
HUMANITIES OF CHINA

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

Interdisciplinary introduction to Chinese civilization, traditional, and modern.  Emphasis on religious; intellectual, artistic, and literary patterns; and societal and cultural ideas.  Lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by quizzes and short papers, a midterm exam, and a paper.

Liberal Studies 278:
HUMANITIES OF ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites

As an interdisciplinary introduction to Islamic civilization, the course explores the rich and complex religious, political, social, cultural and intellectual institutions and experiences that have shaped the Muslim world since the emergence of Islam in the 7th century A.D. The course emphasizes the shared religious, cultural and societal ideals of Muslims and their adaptation in various historical and geographic contexts.  Lectures, with discussion on primary source materials. Evaluation is by class participation, essay exams and a paper.

Liberal Studies 281:
REPRESENTATIONS OF OTHERNESS

5 credits; BCGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

The examination of images and narratives.  Other in major works of modern literature, art and film from the 19th Century to the present.  Themes include the roles of unconscious, languages, gender, and politics in the construction and destruction of self and others. Lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by class participation, two take home essays, and one in class exam.

Liberal Studies 283:
RELIGION AND GLOBALIZATION

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

No prerequisites.

Focus on religious responses to globalization through case studies of modern religious movements. Case studies will be chosen to explore cultural interaction and religious change in a world shaped by technological revolutions and increased communication, information, and migration.   Evaluation is by two tests and a final exam, plus classroom participation.

Liberal Studies 300:
DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-15 credits; Class size: 

An individualized course of study not available through or replacing existing curriculum, to be arranged between one matriculating student and sponsoring faculty member. All academic policies and registration deadlines apply. Directed Independent Study courses cannot substitute for General University Requirements and are not eligible for tuition waiver.

Liberal Studies 301:
HISTORICAL METHODS IN THE HUMANITIES

5 credits; Class size: 20

Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of instructor; one course from LBRL 121, 122, 123 or HIST 111, 112, 113.

Methods of cultural and intellectual history.  Locating texts in their historical and cultural context by analyzing their authors, audiences, and arguments.

Liberal Studies 302:
METHODS OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY

5 credits; Class size: 20

Prerequisites: Completion of LBRL 121, 122, simultaneous registration in LBRL 123, a ‘B’ average in all previous Liberal Studies classes, and permission of the instructor.  Taught only in spring quarter. Required for all Humanities majors.  Prerequisites for LBRL 421, 422, 423, and  424.

Exploration of techniques of interdisciplinary investigation through analysis of a major literary text in its cultural and historical context; exercise in the use of library as a research tool; preparation of a seminar paper.  Advanced comparative cultural study, which is one of the defining objectives of the Department of Liberal Studies, requires an ability to work in multiple disciplines, to combine disciplines, and ultimately, to think beyond the borders of the established disciplines that structure our university.  That is why this seminar is required of third-year humanities majors in the department.  It provides an intensive exercise in interdisciplinary method through the analysis and interpretation of a single complex text.  The text is either the Comedy of Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) or the Don Quixote of Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616).  The seminar is designed to establish a repeating pattern, in which we work progressively from the text to context (other relevant ancient, medieval or early modern sources) to scholarship (critical studies of Dante or Cervantes).  All students are required to make class room presentations on the assigned text and contextual sources.  These presentations become the basis for papers, focused again on text and context.  Further research on a presentation topic will lead to an annotated bibliography and a research paper using scholarship (studies) as well as text and context.  Revision in response to the instructor's comments is required for research papers.

Liberal Studies 303:
METHODS IN THE STUDY OF RELIGION

5 credits; Class size: 20

Prerequisites:  One course from LBRL 231, LBRL 271, LBRL 272, LBRL 278, LBRL 380, LBRL 382 or permission of instructor.

An examination of the academic study of religion as a problem in the interaction of theory, method, and the history of culture. Considers approaches to understanding and explaining religion from the Enlightenment to the present.  An overview of methods applied in the study of religion and a survey of the history of the discipline.  Evaluation is by essay exams and a term paper.

Liberal Studies 321:
BETWEEN RENAISSANCE AND INQUISITION: CENSORSHIP AND RELIGIOUS CONFLICT IN SPAIN’S GOLDEN AGE

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: One previous Liberal Studies course, or HIST 112, or HON 104, or permission of instructor.

Early modern Spain has simultaneously been perceived as an artistic Golden Age (which saw a flourishing production of plays, verse, and prose) and as an era in which censorship and religious intolerance closed off Spain and its empire to the wider world. The course explores this central paradox in Spanish religious, cultural and intellectual history, through an interdisciplinary examination of literature, trial records, painting and architecture. It examines the foundation of the Spanish Inquisition in a society which included Christians, Muslims, and Jews; it traces the development of Catholic laws and courts both in European contexts and in Spain's American colonies.

Liberal Studies 323:
ROMANTIC PARADOX: LOVE, LIFE, AND DEATH

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of the instructor.

Study of Romanticism as a complex, international cultural movement, originating in the late 18th century, with continuing vitality, and influences into the present.  Exploration of characteristic Romantic tensions: the desire for unity, harmony, infinity, and beauty versus the experience of fragmentation, limitation and loss.  Evaluation is by attendance and class participation and three short essays; no exams.

Liberal Studies 325:
SURVEILLANCE, VOYEURISM AND THE CULTURE OF SUSPICION

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of the instructor.

This course will trace the concept of surveillance and its connection to voyeurism as the primordial desire to see from the 18th Century to the present. Through careful reading of primary and secondary sources of literature, sociology, philosophy, history, journalism, and film studies; and analysis of visual material, this course will examine the paradox within the concept of surveillance which can be understood as a means to implement security and insure peace as well as constituteing a threat to private and civic rights and freedoms. Formally, the course will alternate between the analysis of visual material and printed material. Class time is divided into lecture, organized class discussion and student presentations.  Evaluation is by attendance and participation, two essays and a research paper.

Liberal Studies 332:
WORLD RELIGIONS

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

No prerequisites.

Beliefs and practices of major world religions; development of religious traditions; historical and phenomenological approaches; religion modern society.

Liberal Studies 333:
RELIGION IN AMERICA

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of the instructor.

Religions traditions, values and institutions in American culture; focus on pluralism; attention to contemporary issues and evens; interdisciplinary perspective.  Evaluation is by class participation, two exams and a paper.

Liberal Studies 334:
HEBREW BIBLE AND THE RELIGION OF ANCIENT ISRAEL

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of instructor.

An academic study of the Biblical tradition, this course is a survey of representative sections of the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament for Christians) and related literature. Biblical texts are analyzed as expressions of how groups or individuals understood themselves, their world, and God. The historical and cultural contexts in which the texts were originally written are emphasized, with attention to the ways that elements of the Hebrew Biblical tradition developed under changing historical circumstances. Teaching is by lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by essay exams and short analytical papers.

Liberal Studies 336:
NEW TESTAMENT AND EARLY CHRISTIANITY

(Please note restrictions on taking more than one Biblical course for GUR Humanities credit.)

5 credits; HUM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of instructor.

An academic study of the Biblical tradition, this course is a survey of the New Testament and related early Christian literature. The texts are analyzed as expressions of how groups or individuals understood themselves, their world, and God. The historical and cultural contexts in which the texts were written are emphasized with attention to the variety of early Christian traditions and their development in changing historical circumstances. Teaching is by lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by essay exams and short analytical papers.

Liberal Studies 338:
MYSTICISM

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of the instructor.

An interdisciplinary exploration of the nature and variety of mysticism.  Theoretical debates concerning psychological roots and cultural conditioning of mysticism.  Includes an examination of important mystics in the Christian, Islamic, and East Asian traditions along their significance for their respective societies.  Instruction is by guided class discussions with some lectures. Evaluation is by a class presentation, a term paper, quizzes, and a final exam.

Liberal Studies 340:
SUFISM: THE ISLAMIC MYSTICAL TRADITION

5 credits; CCOM; Class size: 25

Prerequisites: Junior status; ENG 101 and 30 credits; and one course from: LBRL 231, LBRL 271, LBRL 278, LBRL 332, LBRL 378, or HIST 287, HIST 406; or instructor permission.

This course explores the Islamic mystical tradition, or Sufism. For long centuries Sufism has contributed to the development of Islamic religious thought, to the global diffusion of the faith, and to the shaping of religious experiences and practices of Muslims in the Middle East, Africa and Asia. It has also enriched the creative and aesthetic aspects of Islamic civilization, most notably music and poetry. We will examine Sufi devotional practices and rituals, teachings of some spiritual masters, and the historical development and growth of Sufism and Sufi orders.

Liberal Studies 345:
FIERCE GODDESSES OF INDIA

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or instructor permission

Analysis of South Asian goddess tradition, with emphasis on the frequently misunderstood 'fierce' goddesses.  Students engage with these traditions through historical sketches, analysis of art, scriptures, and devotional poetry, and ethnographic studies of contemporary goddess worship.  The course is grounded with readings and lectures on feminism and the historical biases which have undercut study and representation of goddess traditions.

Liberal Studies 360:
CHINA AND THE EMERGING WORLD ECONOMY: FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE EARLY MODERN

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or instructor permission.

Helpful background knowledge: an introductory course in Chinese history

The focus of this course will be early stages of the unfolding of ‘globalization’ in Eurasia, from antiquity into the early modern period. Particular attention will be given to China’s important role in these developments and how it was affected in turn.  Also offered as EAST 360.  Lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by class participation and exams.

Liberal Studies 362:
ISLAM IN THE INDIAN OCEAN

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

Prerequisites: Junior status or instructor permission.

Explores cross cultural contacts in the Indian Ocean world from East Africa, Arabia and the Persian Gulf to South and Southeast Asia, and the history and role of Islam and Muslims from the 14th century to the present. Focuses on texts by or about Muslim travelers—Sufis, pilgrims, scholars, and merchants—and their creation of networks, identities, and “Muslim spaces.”  Shows that some aspects of globalization have a long history in the Indian Ocean.

Liberal Studies 372:
POSTCOLONIAL NOVELS: ART, RHETORIC AND SOCIAL CONTEXT

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior status or instructor permission.

Critical readings of postcolonial novels.  Close attention to how they have been shaped as artistic wholes, and how they try to shape emotions and beliefs of readers.  Reading beyond the novels about contexts which they assume and incompletely express: change and the absence of change in postcolonial societies.  Evaluation is by written exams and a paper.

Liberal Studies 375:
BUDDHISM

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 45

Prerequisites: One course from LBRL 231, 271, 272, 275, 277; HIST 370.

Buddhismwith a broad overview of the teachings of Buddism and its core beliefs and practices.  This course will then turn to detailed study of the doctrines and institutions of particular Buddhist traditions.  Evolution from Theravada Buddhism to Mahayana, the Buddhism of the ‘Great Vehicle’, and the idea that every human being is on the path to becoming a Buddha.  We will read three primary texts, the Dhamapada, a Theravada text, and Inquiry of Ugra, and the Lotus Sutra, texts which reveal different stages in the development of Mahayana.  Finally we will trace the further evolution of Buddhism in China and Japan by examining the role of artifacts, holy relics, rosary beads and ‘dry gardens’.  Evaluation is by participation, two exams, and three student presentations and papers.

Liberal Studies 378:
RELIGION AND SOCIETY IN INDIA

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Examination of major Indian religious traditions, including Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism.  Emphasis on ritual systems, belief and value systems, and systems of social identification; emphasis on the relation of religion to social and gender identities, communal politics, and social change, in the classical modern periods.  Lecture and discussion. Evaluation is by classroom participation, essay exams, and a term paper.

Liberal Studies 380:
RELIGION AND SOCIETY IN CHINA

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

A detailed examination of the major religious and philosophical traditions of pre-modern China: the native traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, ancestor worship and popular religion, as well as Buddhism, which came to East Asia from India. Particular attention is given to the interaction and intertwining of these traditions, and of the ways they shaped and supported the lives of individuals and communities.

Liberal Studies 382:
RELIGION AND SOCIETY IN JAPAN

5 credits; ACGM; Class size: 30

A detailed examination of the major religious and philosophical traditions of Japan: the agrarian religion of Shintoism, the Confucian system of ethics, imported from China, and Buddhism, which though originally from India also came to Japan through China. Particular attention is given to the interaction and intertwining of these traditions, and of the ways they shaped and supported the lives of individuals and communities.

Liberal Studies 400:
DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-15 credits

Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

An individualized course of study not available through or replacing existing curriculum, to be arranged between one matriculating student and sponsoring faculty member.  All academics policies and registration deadlines apply.  Directed Independent Study courses cannot substitute for General University Requirements (GUR) and are not eligible for tuition waiver.

Senior Seminars: Liberal Studies 421-425:

5 credits; Class size: 20

Prerequisites: LBRL 302 and permission of the instructor.  In special cases LBRL 302 may be waived based upon equivalent preparation in other departments.  All satisfy requirements for upper division writing proficiency courses, and require well prepared individual student presentations.

  • Liberal Studies 421:
    TRADITIONAL INDIAN MEDICINE

    Advanced seminar on traditional medicine in South Asia.  Emphasis on theories of medicine and approaches to the study of traditional medical systems from the perspective of the humanities and social sciences.  Topics may include theory and practice of Ayurveda, Siddha, Tantra, Unani, Homeopathy, and specific issues such as approaches to pregnancy, childbirth, and mental health in India and abroad, from pre-colonial India to recent times.  Students conduct a research project in consultation with the instructor and apply methodologies from a variety of disciplines to evaluate complex cultural issues. 

  • Liberal Studies 422:
    THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS: PHILOSOPHY, LITERATURE, AND THE GOOD LIFE

    This seminar examines the intersection and cross-fertilization of philosophy and literature in modern European and American culture.  At the center of our investigation is one of the fundamental questions regarding the purpose and value of human existence: How do we define happiness and what constitutes a good life?  Inquiry into this question departs from the Socratic stance, which promotes the relentless practice of critical self-awareness in our pursuit of knowledge, wisdom, virtue, and happiness.

  • Liberal Studies 423:
    RELATIONS BETWEEN JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN CULTURES IN EUROPE, c. 1100-c. 1650

    A seminar in which we investigate some of the many ways in which Jewish and Christian cultures influenced each other - through individuals, text, institutions, and communities - during formative periods in the history of medieval and early modern Europe.  Through analysis and interpretation of select sources, we will study several aspect of Jewish-Christian interaction - some singular, some episodic, some ongoing - including legal structures regulating relations between Jews and Christians, forms of direct cultural exchange (ideas, beliefs, practices, etc.), individual cases of religious conversion, uses of polemical literature, episodes of inter-communal violence, and the manifestation of concerns with purity and exclusion.

  • Liberal Studies 424:
    EXPLORING APOCALYPTICISM

    This course seeks to understand the social phenomenon of millenarianism.  Apocalyptic social movements typically hold beliefs that stand at odds with their culture, and often material reality. Outbreaks of cosmic expectation happen at moments of cultural encounter and rapid change. As a result, millennial expectation often is associated with social radicalism and extremism, and sometimes is a factor in religious violence. This course uses case studies from new religious movements and historic events in established world religions to explore these issues. By introducing students to a broad base of theorists and methodologies, this class cultivates an interdisciplinary understanding of the humanities and social sciences. Students in LBRL 424 will both engage in historiographic debate and pursue research projects of their own.

  • Liberal Studies 425:
    THE CITY AND THE EARLY MODERN IBERIAN WORLD

    This seminar explores the interconnected histories of the cities of the Hispanic and Portuguese worlds in the early modern era.  Examining the intersection of the urban history and the development of the global empires of Spain and Portugal between the 15th and the 18th centuries, the course considers such topics as colonialism, migration, gender, race, religion, and political culture.  The construction of civic identities will also be approached through the study of early modern architecture, painting, music, and literature.

Liberal Studies 430:
THE HUMANITIES AND THE CONTEMPORARY WORKPLACE

3 credits; Seminar; Class size: 20

Prerequisites: Instructor Permission.

Connects liberal-arts curriculum to workplace issues. Uses the ideas and methods of the humanities to explore the meaning of work for society and the individual. Introduces students to professional work environments through placement in local non-profit agencies. Carries service-learning credit.

Liberal Studies 428:
REVIVAL AND REFORM IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD

5 credits; Class size: 20

Prerequisites: One course from LBRL 231, 271, 278, 332, 378, HIST 287, 406.

An exploration of the ideological foundations and historical contexts of reform movements in the Middle East, Asia and Africa from the 18th century up to the various contemporary Salafi movements commonly recognized as ‘fundamentalist’.  Islamic responses to imperialism, colonialism, and ‘modernization’ through the analysis of texts written by major Muslim modernist and revivalist thinkers, such as al-Afghani, Sayyid Ahmad Khan, Abduh, Mawdudi, Qutb, Khomeini and others. Evaluation is by two short papers and one longer research paper (12-15 pages) which students also present to the class.

Liberal Studies 498:
READINGS FOR RESEARCH IN THE HUMANITIES

3 credits

Prerequisites: Enrollment is limited to Humanities majors. Senior status, successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in a Senior Seminar (LBRL 421-425), and permission of instructor.

Reading for the senior paper on a topic developed by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor; writing a research proposal and bibliography.  Weekly meetings with the faculty advisor are required.

Liberal Studies 499:
RESEARCH IN THE HUMANITIES

3 credits

Prerequisites: Enrollment is limited to Humanities majors.  Senior status, successful completion of a Senior Seminar (Liberal Studies 421-425), Liberal Studies 498.

Research and writing for the senior paper on a topic developed by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor in LBRL 498.  Weekly meetings with the faculty advisor are required.