Fall 2021 300 and 400-Level Courses

LING 302: Acadian Diaspora in Canada and the US

Dr. Christina Keppie

  • Credits: 5
  • Prerequisites: One course from: LING 201, ANTH 247, ENG 370, TESL 401 or HNRS 217; or instructor permission.

Description:

Through the course, we will investigate the contemporary cultural and linguistic impacts of 18th century ethnic cleansing and present-day assimilation on Acadian communities in Eastern Canada and parts of the United States. Through course readings, discussions, and presentations, students will explore language ideologies and linguistic features that make up the social identity of a minority group’s ethnic survival in 21st century North America.

LING 402: Endangered Languages

Dr. Judith Pine

  • Delivery Mode: This class will meet in person, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 1-2:50, with a remote-synchronous option for students who are unable to meet in person.
  • Credits: 5
  • Prerequisites: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, LING 207, or ANTH 347.

Description

Many linguists predict that by the year 2050 over half of the world’s languages will be dead or dying. As many scholars have noted, the figures used in these predictions are difficult to verify. Nevertheless, language loss is occurring and this projected loss of linguistic diversity is of deep concern, not only for those whose languages are at risk, but also to those who use dominant languages as their primary form of communication. Through the lens of language revitalization, or Reversing Language Shift (RLS), this class explores the phenomenon of language loss, the relationship between political and economic factors and language maintenance, and the resiliency of human languages in the face of homogenizing forces.

 

The core of the course is the concept of language revitalization. We’ll explore the motivation(s) behind this process, the methods and the obstacles encountered in efforts to revive and maintain endangered languages. We will consider the impact of language ideology on the process of language revitalization, and explore the various methods with which linguistic anthropologists, linguists and speakers of endangered languages are working to return these languages to vitality, with special attention to the role of new technologies in work on language shift. The class will culminate in poster presentations based on your research papers, allowing each of you to present your research to your peers and colleagues both within and outside our class.

LING 402: The Structure of Spanish

Dr. R. Mata

  • Credits: 5
  • Prerequisites: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, LING 207, or ANTH 347.
  • Though students do not need to proficient in Spanish to take the course, nor be Spanish majors/minors, they should familiar with Spanish even if at a basic level.

Description:

This course surveys aspects of Spanish phonetics, phonology (syllable structure and the main phonological processes of Spanish), morphology (inflectional & derivational morphology), and morphosyntax (nominal & verbal agreement and clitics) from different varieties of Spanish. We will also cover some historical aspects of Spanish such as Latin and Greek lexical roots as well as the evolution of sibilants from Vulgar Latin to Medieval Spanish. Generally, students with intermediate proficiency in Spanish have enrolled in the course. However, those with basic understanding of grammar and vocabulary will also be a good fit for the course. Please contact the instructor (R.Mata@wwu.edu) if you have any questions.

LING 402: Linguistics, Education, and Social Justice

Dr. Anne Lobeck

  • Credits: 5
  • Prerequisites: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, LING 207, or ANTH 347.

Description

Though much valuable work is going on both in terms of scholarship on education and innovative classroom practices and methodologies, much teaching about language still remains based in Standard English ideology, marginalizing speakers of varieties of English not considered ‘mainstream.’  In this class, we will explore racist and other systemic discriminatory practices in education: what they are, how they came to be, and why they continue. We will investigate a diverse range of research and practice on enacting linguistic and educational change, within both the academy and the community. Students will also conduct their own research on JEDI (justice, equity, diversity and inclusivity) in linguistics for class projects.

LING 411: Topics Phonetics and Phonology: Laboratory Phonology

Dr. Jordan Sandoval

  • Credits: 5
  • Prerequisites: LING 311
  • WP3

Description

Topics in Phonetics and Phonology, our topic will be Laboratory Phonology. Specifically, we'll explore the ways that phonological hypotheses are tested in laboratory settings. In this class, you'll have many opportunities to read current literature in experimental approaches to phonology, as well as the chance to design your own experiment to test some hypothesis. Some of the aspects of laboratory phonology we'll cover include ethical research considerations, the distinction and overlap between phonetics and phonology, experimental design, understanding and getting information from academic articles, and how to write in the style of the field.