College of Humanities & Social Sciences

Spring 2019 400-Level Courses

Spring 2019 400-Level Courses

*Please note, if you plan on registering for more than one LING 402 course per quarter, you must register in person at the Registrar's Office in OM 230

LING 431: Grammaticalization - Janet Xing, Ph.D.

TR 10-11:50 +hr arr

Prerequisite: LING 331

Credits: 5

Course Description: This course (WP3) investigates both theoretical and methodological issues relevant to the study of grammaticalization, the change whereby lexical terms (e.g. nouns and verbs) and constructions come in certain linguistic contexts to serve grammatical functions (e.g. particles, aspect markers). Prerequisite Ling331.

OBJECTIVES: This course is designed for linguistic students to gain a general understanding of the study of grammaticalization. Through class discussion, reading materials, and a research project, students explore the core areas of grammaticalization: morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic changes. Directionality and characteristics of typological variations in grammaticalization will also be examined.

LING 402: Anthropological Semiotics - Judith Pine, Ph.D.

MWF 1-2:20

Prerequisite: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, ENG 270 or ANTH 347

Credits: 5

Course Description: In this course, you will develop an understanding of the way that utterance and context interact to produce meaning, and the variety of ways in which meaning-making is essential to being human.  You will develop a basic understanding of both Saussurian and Piercean semiotics, and the use of semiotic analysis to gain insight into the frames we use to make sense of the world around us.  You will have the opportunity to reflect on the potential of semiotic analysis for making sense of data collected through linguistic, ethnographic and archaeological research.  In this class, we will discover the wide range of linguistic anthropology’s exploration of the way that language, meaning and mind interact.

Although the class has a linguistic anthropology focus, we will explore the value and uses of semiotics within other subdisciplines, in particular the use of semiotic archaeology in the analysis of archaeological artifacts and the way in which semiotic analysis can make sense of a constitution of the human body.

You will have the opportunity to use the tools of semiotic anthropology in an analysis of a symbolic system with which you feel comfortable and familiar.

LING 402: Japanese Linguistics - Masanori Deguchi, Ph.D.

MWF 11:30-12:50

Prerequisite: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, ENG 270 or ANTH 347

Credits: 5

Course Description: This course is a survey of various aspects of the structure of Japanese: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. We will also discuss some diachronic and synchronic variations (historical changes and regional dialects). We approach these topics from both descriptive and theoretical perspectives. It is therefore beneficial for both students of Japanese and students of linguistics interested in Japanese.

LING 402/ENG 438: Language Change & Variation - Anne Lobeck, Ph.D.

TR 2-3:50

Prerequisite: ENG 370 or instructor permission

Credits: 5

Course Description: In this course, we will explore ways in which language changes over time and varies over space, and the factors that contribute to that change and variation. To this end, we will explore a variety of different topics, including the historical development of English in the British Isles; the rise of prescriptive grammar and language standardization; English as a colonial language; contact languages (pidgins and creoles) that arose from the slave trade; American dialects and global Englishes, and more. We will also explore how language shapes our identity, our perceptions of others based on their language(s), and the consequences of those perceptions.

LING 402/ENG 436: The Structure of English - Anne Lobeck, Ph.D. 

TR 10-11:50

Prerequisite: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, ENG 270 or ANTH 347

Credits: 5

Course Description: This course is designed to make you love something you think you hate: grammar. In fact, as you progress through the course you will likely find that studying grammar is not only less terrifying that you thought, but in fact, that it is actually rather interesting, and a lot of the time, even fun. Rather than correcting each other and learning ‘proper grammar’ in this class, we discover, by exploring your own intuitive knowledge of English, how this fascinating and complex and ever changing language works. This investigation provides you with the tools to analyze language in general, and English in particular, in any representation.

Along with the more technical aspects of grammatical analysis, we will explore how linguistic facts intersect (or don’t) with social attitudes about language and grammar. There are many thorny questions that arise when we find that in terms of grammatical structure, all language varieties are created equal, though many claim that one way of speaking is more desirable than another. Such judgments are social, not linguistic, and they tell us a lot about what we think of each other. They also have powerful social, political, and cultural effects that we will explore together in this class. 

LING 402: Salish Research & Revitalization - Emily Curtis, Ph.D. 

TR 12-1:50

Prerequisite: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, ENG 270 or ANTH 347

Credits: 5

Course Description: This course is an introduction to doing research on local indigenous languages and to the basic structures of a Salish language. Taking a pseudo-fieldwork approach with Lushootseed learning materials co-created by a linguist, we will explore and discover patterns in the basic phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon/semantics and sociolinguistics of Lushootseed and develop a descriptive sketch of the language. We will also study published discussions on each grammatical component (phonology, morphology, syntax and lexicon), and students will present on a small research project. Throughout the course and as a final unit, we will think critically about language revitalization, the experiences of local indigenous communities, and, from an ethical perspective, the roles of (non-tribal) linguists.