Spring 2021 300 and 400-Level Courses

LING 302: Human Neuroanatomy of Language

Dr. McNeel Jantzen

  • Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1-2:20
  • Delivery Mode: Remote-Synchronous
  • Prerequisites: One course from: LING 201, ANTH 247, ENG 370, TESL 401 or HNRS 217; or instructor permission.
  • Credits: 5

Description

This course will focus on human neuroanatomy of language and speech and introduce neuroimaging techniques.  It will provide a solid neurophysiological and neuroimaging foundation for students to then learn neuroanatomical models for language and speech at the 400 level.

LING 402: German Linguistics

Dr. Shannon Dubenion-Smith

  • Schedule: Tuesday/Thursday 12-1:50
  • Delivery Mode: Remote-Synchronous
  • Prerequisite: LING 310; one course from: LING 204, ENG 270 or ANTH 347
  • Credits: 5

Description

This course is an introduction to the exciting field of Germanic linguistics. We will begin by looking at the Germanic languages from a diachronic perspective, making our way from a linguistic and cultural-historical overview of Proto-Indo-European, via a discussion of early Germanic texts, to a snapshot of the Germanic languages today. Next, we will compare the modern Germanic languages with respect to characteristic phonological, morphological, and syntactic features. The first half of the quarter will conclude with an investigation of Germanic dialectology, which will include a look at dialectal differences in the United States and the public perception of these differences. During the second half of the quarter, we will continue first with an overview of Germanic languages as they are spoken around the world, then we will move on to a range of topics in Germanic sociolinguistics such as language and gender, language planning, and diglossia.  

LING 411: Topics in Phonetics and Phonology

Dr. Jordan Sandoval

  • Schedule: Tuesdays/Thursdays 9-9:50
  • Delivery Mode: Remote-Blended
  • Prerequisite: LING 311; one course from: LING 204, ENG 270 or ANTH 347
  • Credits: 5
  • WP3

Description

This quarter's topic is sounds and symbols; the effect of orthography on mental representations. After a brief review of some phonographic systems, we'll explore ways in which our mental representations, lexical access, and word production are impacted by how words are written, both in our L1 as well as in language learning environments. The course will be structured like a seminar, with active discussions of assigned and chosen primary literature (journal articles predominately) and opportunities for students to guide our course direction. The quarter will culminate with a research paper of your own wherein you propose and justify a line of inquiry for potential future continued exploration.