Summer 2021 Linguistics Courses

LING 201: Intro to Linguistics

Dr. Anne Lobeck

  • Delivery Mode: Remote-Asynchronous
  • Credits: 5
  • Social Sciences GUR (SSC)

Description:

Introduction to the scientific study of language and the various subfields of linguistics, including how language is acquired, how it varies across time and space, and how it is used in different social contexts.

LING 310: Linguistic Analysis

Dr. McNeel Jantzen

  • Delivery Mode: Remote-Asynchronous
  • Credits: 5
  • Prerequisites not enforced summer quarter.

Description

This is a focused introduction to linguistic analysis in phonetics, phonology, syntax, and semantics.  The course will also offer students the opportunity to learn experimental techniques using programs such as: PRAAT, Synthworks, and PsychoPy.  This course prepares students for more in-depth courses in theory and analysis and is a prerequisite for most courses within the Linguistics major (and minor).  

LING 204: Language and Society

Dr. Emily Curtis

  • Delivery Mode: Remote-Asynchronous
  • Credits: 5
  • Social Sciences GUR (SSC)

Description

Slang is all around us. It's imaginative and funny and cool. But what is slang in academic terms? What counts as slang and what slang a person knows are socially determined, so, since sociolinguistics examines how  language use reflects social identities, a sociolinguistic lens can shed much light on this interesting phenomenon. And in turn, slang can help us to better understand our sociolinguistic world. In this course, we'll examine slang by applying and comparing sociolinguistic concepts such as gendered language, dialects, politeness, and code-switching.

LING 402: The Structure of English

Dr. Anne Lobeck

  • Delivery Mode: Remote-Asynchronous
  • Credits: 5
  • Prerequisites not enforced summer quarter.

Description

This course is designed to make you love something you think you hate: grammar. In fact, as you progress through the course you will likely find that studying grammar is not only less terrifying that you thought, but in fact, that it is actually rather interesting, and a lot of the time, even fun. Rather than correcting each other and learning ‘proper grammar’ in this class, we discover, by exploring your own intuitive knowledge of English, how this fascinating and complex and ever changing language works. This investigation provides you with the tools to analyze language in general, and English in particular, in any representation.

Along with the more technical aspects of grammatical analysis, we will explore how linguistic facts intersect (or don’t) with social attitudes about language and grammar. There are many thorny questions that arise when we find that in terms of grammatical structure, all language varieties are created equal, though many claim that one way of speaking is more desirable than another. Such judgments are social rather than based on linguistic fact, and they tell us a lot about what we think of each other. They also have powerful social, political, and cultural effects that we will explore together in this class.